Tucson Daily Citizen from Tucson, Arizona on March 5, 1968 · Page 15
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Tucson Daily Citizen from Tucson, Arizona · Page 15

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Tucson, Arizona
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Tuesday, March 5, 1968
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Page 15
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Comics Movies TUESDAY. MARCH 5, 1968 PAGE 15 Foothills Water Rate Upped 80 Per Cent By City Council By CHARLES TURBYVILLE Citizen Staff Writer The City Council has handed some 180 families in the Catalina foothills a water' rate increase of around 80 per cent, at the same time setting the stage for similar increases to other residents of "special ser- 'vice areas" outside the city limits. -· The areas immediately affected by yesterday's action include Skyline Belaire Estates, Mur- phy-Crayeroft addition anl a 'portion of Coronado Foothills Estates. .' Henceforth, they will pay a $7.50 minimum charge for the first 700 cubic feet of water consumed and 65 cents per 100 cubic feet thereafter. Water and .Sewers Director Frank Brooks said this rate would produce approximately the same revenue as a previously proposed $9 minimum rate. He said the $7.50 minimum ·will keep the city's rates competitive with private water companies operating in the area. ., Two residents of the areas protested, partly, on the ground 'that, since they lived outside the city, the council didn't represent them. Both Mayor James N. Corbett Jr. and Councilman Conrad Joyner saiti there is a remedy for this. "The city clerk has (annexation) petitions,'' Corbett said. "You can be part of the city anytime you have the courage." "The mayor has indeed put his finger on it," Joyner said. He urged the residents to come into the · city. "We need you maybe more than you need us," he said. Councilman Kirk Storch and James J. Murphy voted against the increase. Storch said he had voted against a general water rate hike in 19fi4 and wanted to remain consistent, adding that he did not believe the water utility should be a profit-making enterprise. Murphy said he felt the council had not given sufficient thought to the issue, although conceding some increase in rates could be justified. Brooks has told tine council the city was losing some $3,000 annually in serving the areas in question. Under the new rate, a small annual surplus over direct costs'will be produced, he said yesterday. In decreeing the new rates for the foothills, the council gave Brooks authority to take similar action in areas outside the city limits "wfiere the costs of provision of water service are excessive due to remoteness from sources of supply, low service densities or excessive pumping costs." Brooks can raise rates in such areas by posting a notice of his intent at City Hall. Thirty days later the increase will take effect. In other council action yesterday, Dr. Rudolf Jimenez, University of Arizona associate professor of civil engineering, reported on recommendations to improve the durability of city asphalt paving. Jimenez undertook a study of this some time ago under a $9,320 contract from the city. He reported that some paving mixes used by the city leave something to be desired. Acting Public Works Director Verne Tregonis said the changes Jimenez recommended would not be expensive to make and promised a full report to the council within two weeks on steps he would take. The study came about as a result of severe problems with potholes and washouts following the rains of December 1965, which produced many complaints from citizens. The council also set March 25 for a public hearing on proposed changes in the urban renewal p r o j e c t plan. T h e changes have to do with preservation of historic sites, a decision to locate the new police headquarters in the project and new federal laws which may make the city eligible for several hundred thousand dollars in federal noncash credits. 1,290 At Smith In Protest Fast NORTHAMPTON, Mass. (UP1) -- Well over half the students at Smith College are fasting for three days to protest the war in Vietnam. Five faculty members and 1,285 students at the prestigious girls' college today were in the second day of their fast, which ends at 6 p.m. Wednesday. There are 2,350 girls enrolled at the college. A spokesman said the fasting students wore green arm bands. In addition, 45 faculty members and 366 students wore white arm bads signifying their sympathy with the antiwar stand, but chose not to fast for personal reasons. Pound Sinks To New Low LONDON (AP) - The British pound dropped to a new low today as demand for gold continued high. At the opening of the London money market, the pound was quoted at $2.3975 -- 33 points below Monday's high. The closing price Monday was $2.3997, nine points below Friday's level, after a high for the day of $2.4008 in the afternoon. The Bank of England stepped in almost at the opening today to support the pound and the rate rose to $2.39855. The dollar parity price for gold at the daily fixing remained just under the ceiling at $35.19. An estimated 25-35 tons changed hands at the fixing, and subsequent sales were expected to raise the day's total on the London market to 50 tons, equaling Friday's mark but far below tht cirsis level last December. Television Radio TUCSON APARTMENTS Occupancy Rated 98% By RICHARD E. WILBUR Citizen Business Editor Tucson apartments, in buildings with 10 to 200 units, were more than 98 per cent occupied lasl month. And many apartment buildings are just about as packed to date in early March. Most apartments not yet occupied seem to be in the $375 to §500-a-month class. That's the picture from three different sources, as visitors warm to the idea of staying in Tucson this winter. Not 'all the high occupancy rate in Tucson apartments is due to winter visitors, however. Just winding up a survey of Tucson apartment occupancy in February is Ted Sitterley, an assistant vice president at Tucson Federal Savings and Loan Association. Apartments he surveyed are located in buildings or complexes with 10 to 200 units. He estimates results of his February study will show occupancy was between 98 and 99 per cent. Four reasons for this are cited by Sitterley: 1 -- Steady growth in the Tucson area. 2 -- Lack of new construction of multifamily units over the past three years. 3 -- Substantial growth of the University of Arizona "and the desire by a great many students to live in apartments" instead of on the campus. ! -- "We're having a heck of a nice winter season, which I assume is a t t r a c t i n g more tourists than if t h e weather were bad." In addition, Silterloy thinks there's "a continuing reason" -training programs held here for periods of several weeks by airlines like Lufthansa. A Tucson apartment guide published by .Fames J. Maun lists some 57 apartment buildings. He estimates they contain about 2,500 apartments.' "At the moment, I think that out of all those, there are only three to four apartments vacant," says Maun. Most of the units are annual- lease a p a r t m e n t s only, he says, but about 750 arc in the short- term rental category. "I don't anticipate this letting up u n t i l some time in April," Haun says. S o m e wintertime tenants came here as early as November, many plan to stay through March and a number expect to stay until late April, according to Haun. "We have upwards of 50 people a day that come into the office, and for very few are we able to locate places to rent," he says. At the Chamber of Commerce, the only vacant apartments which the visitors' and convention department knows of range in rental from $375 to ?500 a month, according to the cle- p a r t m e n t manager, Bernie Roth. He expects Tucson to be a drawing card to tourists up through Easter, April 14, and into Tucson Festival Week, April 18-22. Among Tucson establishments which list themselves in the telephone directory as "resorts," the Tucson Daily Citizen chose six at random to question about the volume of visitors in the current tourist season. Resort descriptions of it ranged from "average" to "exceptional." The establishments themselves varied in type of accommodation from moderate to plush. Comments from each of the six: "I'd say if anything we're running ahead of last year for the peak season. I anticipate a better April than last year. April isn't a peak season, of course. '-We always tell them April is one of our nicest months, and it is." "We've been completely filled all season. We've been turnig people away lately -- eight or 10 yesterday." "Every room we've had has been booked 100 per cent, plus farming people out to other motels. We have people standing in line waiting. We have only 66 rooms and eight apartments." "I think we're looking for about a record, at our current rate of reservations." "We're a little under what it was last year at this tune. But Easter is on April 14th this year. I think it'll be about average for us for the year." "It's going to be an exceptional year. Florida is having the most miserable weather ever, but they just don't let bad weather news out. Here, I think bad weather could be handled a little more discreetly than it is." Tennis Classes Set Instructional tennis classes for adults are offered by the Tucson Jewish Community Center, 102 N. Plumer Ave., beginning tomorrow. Leo Richling, pro at the El Dorado Lodge will be the instructor for the classes from 10 to 11 a.m. Woody Cohen is in charge of registration at the center. 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