Independent from Long Beach, California on January 16, 1975 · Page 88
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Independent from Long Beach, California · Page 88

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Long Beach, California
Issue Date:
Thursday, January 16, 1975
Page:
Page 88
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Pmv-Tttoram. ttttmtn, 1*\. is, \m , n*ntn. Jw. U, nis Greek lawyer purge? ByJOHNRIGOS ' A T H E N S (UPI) - The , Athens Lawyers Association has threatened 2,000 lawyers with disbarment kir collaborating with the military government that \vas overthrown last July. Alexandras Sakellaro- poulos, president of the association, said recently all members who served the junta will be judged by disciplinary committees. .- If they are found guilty ·of "having insulted the ilegal profession," they will be disbarred, he said. ; The sanction will force ··the lawyers to lose their .* pensions as well as their right to practice. '·Some lawyers and '."newspapers h a v e criti- · cized the purge as too ; h^rsh. f A T H E N S L A W Y E R Spyros Zournadjis, who ' served as spokesman for ", the government of Spyros Markezinis, that attempted to hold elections in · .1973, said, "Even Commu- ' nist lawyers who led the j'a'rmed i n s u r r e c t i o n ;. against the country in the ' ''late 1940s were not expell- ' ;.ed from the association." ' r - The Salonica newspaper ''JEUinikos Vorras said "the ; "ccode of lawyers does not !'· allow disbarment on po- 1 ^'litical grounds." '. Some lawyers opposed i - to the purge called for the · "election of new officers of f - ! h e lawyers association. ^T-hey said the present ^leadership was appointed ,· 6y the government and is ; i.riol representative of the ' * association. · ;.'·· The government has so j f a r stayed outside the dis- ^pute. I,--. "This is a matter con. r*cerning only the lawyers '·4 themselves," a govern- 'vfiient spokesman said. . r^-Sakellarppoulos said the · Jigurge decision was "just . Vj and democratic." - £,'.- "Those who collaborat- 'r~t;d with the dictatorship '^.insulted the legal profes- '*---5ion," he said. "Those .^who did not respect the 'fi cbnslilution-and 'the -laws' X"should be punished." ^ · ^Plenty of bread [·'KANSAS CITY « '. f"T*raders on the Kansas :'3City Board of Trade -- the · World's l a r g e s t w i n t e r r.Jwheat market -- buy and '·sell an average of more '··~ than six million bushels of " I'wheat each day. · ' O f f i c i a l s at the KC r * grain market say that's ;-the equivalent of 180 mil- · : " lion loaves of bread. World press views AMERICAN MOTORS' 1975 Pacer is a wide small car unique in concept and designed to appeal to a broad range of car buyers. By ART STEPHAN Auto Editor In a.sharp break with the usual car design, American Motors has introduced the Pacer, a wide, small car unique in concept and designed to appeal to a broad range of car buyers. Auto writers from across the U.S. were in Palm Springs last week to see and drive the Pacer and to hear company executives tell of their promotional plans for the appealing car -- going to the public -March. Roy D. Chapin Jr., AMC board chairman, told a North American news preview that the Pacer, "illustrates again that American Motors is committed to providing distinctive ideas and products which are responsive to rapidly-changing times. "In 1971, the company pioneered an all-inclusive car warranty designed to protect consumers, the Buyer Protection Plan. A year earlier, in 1970, the company made a product commitment to consumers with the Gremlin, the first U.S.-built subcompact car. By introducing the Pacer, the company now reaffirms its commitment to being responsive to the ever-changing product needs of consumers." PACER DEVELOPMENT began four years ago with studies on personal mobility that could be anticipated in the late 1970's and early 1980's. The objective was "to meld together the specific ingredients of a car that would be in harmony with the environment of the coming decade," Chapin said. "Several attempts were made to design such a car, and then one emerged that seemed to fit the objective," he said. "Subsequently, it was taken before panels of car buyers of widely varying purchase preferences -- small car buyers, medium sized buyers, big car buyers -- and they ware asked for their opinions. They responded and we reacted to their suggestions." Chapin said the Pacer is unlike anything American Motors has introduced in the past, and in many respects, it departs from anything ever offered by other automobile manufacturers. "In a true sense, it is not revolutionary, but its total effect is one of marked difference," he said. "The exterior is not traditional in its configuration, and its interior has the people space of much larger cars." The two-door Pacer, with a 100-inch wheelbase, is offered in three versions--a standard model, a sporty "X" and a luxury D/L model. It has an overall length of 171.5 inches, making it easier to park and maneuver. The four-passenger car has two large asymmetrical doors. The curb-side door is four inches longer than the driver's door for easy entry and exit of rear seat ~ passengers". Both doors are cut into the roof to further facilitate entering and exiting. A large rear hatch housing the rear window provides easy access to the luggage area behind the rear seat. The back seat can be folded forward for added cargo carrying capacity. OPTIMUM VISIBILITY never before experienced with a car of Pacer dimensions results from its expansive window area and low belt line. W i t h i n t e r i o r design paramount d u r i n g its development, the Pacer provides more inside room than any other American small car. Passenger comfort is enhanced by big seats plus exceptional head ; shoulder, hip and leg room. The instrument panel is easy to read and all controls are conveniently located in front of the driver. pl^^^p^^^^^^^ggm^^BBSjg^H^DKIflBi^BBi^^^^^^B^HMi^^ 111 ^^^^".^^^^^TM""** You Save MORE in January During Our FACTORY Cliarance! Famous Calif. Manufacturer TO TIE PUBLIC Ladies' Dresses Sportswear Polyester Pants Shirts Values to 12,00 SALE PRICE Double knit pants in solids and novelty patterns. Missy sizes 8 to 20. Long and short sleeve shirts in a variety of patterns and colors. Shirts in Missy 820, and 14 1 /; to 24'A Misses' Half Size DRESSES Values to 20,00 NOW 5 $KOO One ond two-piece dresses in 100°; polyester knits. Street lengths in solids and novelties. Latest fashion details. Misses' Half Sire PANT SUITS Values to 25,00 NOW Many styles in polyester double knits. Big selection of solids or po^e'tv Dorterns in the season's newest styles or colors. ea, J...IHW I nvitj ifi v n.,i- i*nn Roneh Faetnrv At wi »«"«g ·»»»···. . -- - -- f --1345 CUT A AVE. V, Hock (forth of Hwhiim St. jutt West of Santa Fe · Phone 436-6047 Use BonkAmericord or Master Charge · Hours: Mon. thru Sal. 9:00-4:30 LONDON (AP) - The pnnvictcd defendants in the Watergate trial "got t h e i r comeuppance," a Philippine newspaper declared and warned local m u n i c i p a l officials to learn a lesson from the outcome. The Philippines Daily Express, a semiofficial paper, was one of several newspapers to comment last week on the guilty verdicts against H . R , Haldeman, John N. Mitchell, John D. Ehrlichman and Robert C. Mardian. It said the aides of for- luded themselves into thinking that being in power clothed them with the right to get away with almost everything." London's conservative Daily Telegraph remarked that in Nixon's White House the buck stopped in his antechamber rather than on the presidential desk. "The proceedings of the .»... nnttnlltHfl tl-lol IVlll convince many people ... that Nixon should have been in the dock, and that the f i n d i n g s of guilt against his closest associates apply equally to him in spirit if not in law," the Telegraph said. The Bangkok Post singled out Judge John J. Sirica for praise. "The one.stellar figure, the one enlightened man who was in Watergate from the beginning, Judge John "J. Sirica, presided until the'end with dignity, with honor and with a sense of fairness," it commented. TURNING to the econo- my, Britain's liberal Guardian noted ; tnai Democrats H'Qmm* are urging President Fora to cut taxes and said he would be wise to,listen to their advice. ·· - y" The Czechoslovak trade ur.ior. newspaper Prace was unenthusiastic ui its first assessment of Nelson A. Rockefeller as vice president. What sin name USDA ; Choice Beef Loin T-Bone Steak $1.75lb. It's every FedMart shopper's assurance that the beef so graded meets rigid specifications set by the US Department of Agriculture. These grading specifications determine tenderness, juiciness, and flavor. USDA Choice is the best grade readily available to consumers. (USDA Prime is rated higher, but the small supply is limited.mainly to restaurants.) You don't need to guess about what grade you're getting, either. Stores selling USDA Choice Beef cuts will tell you. Stores selling other grades usually don't and often try to mislead shoppers with fancy names. So to be sure of superior quality, look for the USDA Choice Beef seal. You'll find it on the package of every, beef cut at FedMart. Each cut is trimmed to give you extra value, too. And, FedMart's prices are lower day-in, day-out than you'd pay for an inferior grade at many stores. Extra Lean Ground Beef 890 Ib. USDA Choice Small End Beef Rib Roast $1.39lb. USDA Choice Beef Round Steak.... $1.05 Ib. Save on meat at FedMart. All beef cuts are USDA Choice Regular Ground Beef 67$ n: Pork Rib Chops $1.57 n. Bdef Loin, USDA Choice ·' «-» Porterhouse Steak $1.79 ID.. USDA Choice * « « « · ' Beef Rib Eye Steak $2.09ib. Fryer Legs... 830m. Fryer Breasts, Ribs Attchd 830 ib. ....'.....'. ...$1.24ib. ·....:.; $1.29 ID. USDA Choice Beef for Stew ... Beef Round, USDA Choice Tip Roast We Gladly Accept U.S. Food Stamps i ne uonsumers Friend Since 1954 FeHMart Family Savings Centers Lincoln Muller (between Euclid Brookhurst), Anaheim Golden West St. McFadden Ave., Westminster/S. Beach Blvd. Imperial St., La Habra 3705 E. South St. (between Downey Ave. Lakewood Blvd.), Long Beach

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