The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on June 20, 1966 · Page 3
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 3

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Blytheville, Arkansas
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Monday, June 20, 1966
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Blythevlll« (Ark.) Courier News - Monday, June 20, 1968 - I'age ihret By Lines ...by You (EDITOR'S NOTE. .1'his column Is lor use by the rsadnrs Material siibmilied will not be returned. All muleria) should be typed and double-spacer! and is subject lo editing. Writers should sign their names and. in the cases of students, «houid give their age. Names will be withheld on request.) Dear Editor: 1 wrote Hie 'Commercial Appeal about what our guest writers did Sunday. There were six of those folks - Who Spoke I'heir Minds — for all of us? Not exactly. We have citizens of every race and color in our United States.. They are all under oath (to behave, regard all laws passed, right? 'Right, bill do they march? Hold up signs? No. They took the word of our nation — that is supposed lo be and is a free country; under God. Our word that they will all be treated.equal. Lets face it, people, wake up:-Every color, and creed has a soul! Are we going to select our crowd, on Resurrection Day? Do you honestly believe this? If so, brother, you'd better get right with God, and get down on your knees and pray, and esk forgiveness. Now listen to me, some one like myself — there's no use to march is there? (Now come en.) Get with it. Let's O.K. these things they have passed in Congress (and signed by the Roosevelts, Kennedy, and Faubus's. Did they do right? You just bet they did. Now to sell the colored people this idea. Hate? Well, I'll tell you, from experience. Speak nice from your heart out. They can tell. They are human like us whites and tans. They love their families and children Sike we do. They love their country. They fight for their country, like we do. (O.K.) Now, why should the negro fight "to poll?" Isn't it a crying and disgraceful shame. The negro works beside you every day, they smile, say good morning — and in their faces, whether the> be in nurses hospital as helper or doctors aren't they just as nice as our whites? You bet they are. Did you know underneath that tan skin, they are white too, — beloved, they are bumble. They love God like we do. God belongs to everyone, on earth. Here's where Congress, has failed. If you put a man out to guard, isn't it just a sign, to say to everyone: "Stay off the green grass." If this man is off Guard, leaves, and returns to Duty, in the Armed Forces, of law only, to direct men in action, only, don't you really think we would have less trouble out of these White and Negro marches? (But first, tell them, at churches and schools (their places of meetings, like ours) they are free to choose their president, governors, lawyers, doctors, school teadier - just as free to poll, as we are. (Their peoples.) It would not be no trouble "of any kind." I honestly believe, they want to be let alone, select their chosen man in office of this U.S.A. just like other races of colors of skin do. They don't feel free to do what they are doing Have you ever walked one mile? In this modern day (?) isn't it rough. Did you read where Hie colored man seeking to be loved by his white friends, wanting their respct so bad? H was 56 years old. "He gave his life in the Freedom March to honor America, most ot all He, Joe, gave his life for his people's liberty." He was seek ing to walk with us to be re- otiicr. Let's get this hate out of our souls, let God take over. He i a s, but have we honestly? Some few have. But lets see more goodness, more respect, shown to our Negro. I don't like the name Negro. No more than most of them do. (They'd oved lo be called friend to us all, like all other races are.) Think, friends, there's no need for a racial war. It's silly and Hie way to win friends is to be a friend to everyone. Unless he or she has violated a law. Then we need Ihe guards. Put the man or woman in prison, 'if anyone steps out of bounds. But for gosh sakes, in America, this great land of ours, when a law is passed or a,bill passed in Congress, by all those men appointed by being polled by the millions forget the what you personally wanted and was disappointed; accept, don't reject shed, and those so called marchers, etc. seek peace. Americans we've all got to pull together and win a War in Vietnam. (Or have you heard of iis being at War over there?) You bet there is a war over there. They've got 280,000 of our men. Whites and Blacks, yes, the Negroes, Indians, Italian, Irish, English Swedish Polish, Czechs American Japanese etc., every race fighting, for freedom over here. To give us back to keep for generations, and hundreds ol years to come, our nation — a place to worship together, play together, step side by side. Let's cut this mess OUT, and respect our LAW, passed by Mrs. President Johnson and our Con gress! To you I say, "there is no need for marches. Let's march forward, in seeking fel lowship, working hard. Let's forget our dislikes. And remem her, friends, there a war going on! They aren't marching they're fighting like the very devil for all of us. (All colors of folks back here at home in American.) Let's pray "we can je all be civil of tongue." Seek understanding, quiet down! Lets UM MUSIC-DRAMA WORKSHOP-Among the members of the 1906 Summer Music- Drama Workshop who will assist in the staging of five productions this summer at the University of Mississippi are (from left): Carolyn Anderson. Cloverport, Term., Demaris Anderson, Mobile, Ala,, Eloise Neshit, Helena, Ark., Calhy Hollingsworth, Blylheville, Ark., Linda Lee Brown, Memphis, Holly Harris, El Dorado, Ark., and Sandy Simmons, Nash- viile, Tenn. "Light Up The Sky," which opens fc.- a three-night run June 23, will begin the summer theatrical season at Ole Miss. Today In History Today Is Monday, June 20lh, the 171st day of 1966. There are 194 days left In the year. Today's highlight in history: On this date in 1931, President Herbert Hoover proposed a one- year international moratorium on payments of inter-governmental debts. Fifteen nations accepted the proposal within a month, but most of them never resumed their payments. On this date In 1632, the colony of Mary- land was granted to Lord Baltimore. In 1789, Hie French Revolution started. In 1863, West Virginia was admitted to the union. In 1867, the treaty providing for the purchase of Alaska was proclaimed by President Andrew Johnson. In 1943, Brilish bombers made their first attack on the German city of Friedrichshaten. Ten years ago—A Venezuelan Super Constellation airliner crashed in flames in the Atlantic about 32 miles east of Asbury Park, N.J. All 64 passengers and 10 crewmen aboard .were killed. Five years ago — Japanese premier Hayato Ikeda began a three-day official visit to Wash- ington. He prepared for talks with President John P. Kennedy on (lie , establishment of a' U.S.-Japan committee on trad* and economic affairs. '.'.." NONE FASTER OR SAFER FOR PUN He oihw t«bl»> In ooveinmtnt- ipontored tetl of S leading piln nllvnit o«v» <Mt«t or tUonger pain relief than St. Joseph Aspirin. And non« tat gentler. St. Joseph . Aspirin contains no costly "extra Ingredients". lt'« 100% pain reliever —it't pure pain relief power... yet , costs) you less than most leading pain relief tablets! STJOSEPH ASPIRIN none iuu.nuu ' ^f tf "^ •=3 r ^S 1 " "W •=• •=• Hal Boyle lack our men in ,et's seek peace! Vietnam!! Guest Writer, Helen Mahan, NEW YORK (AP) - Things a columnist might never know if he didn't open his mail: If you drive aftev taking six drinks, there's a l-in-20 chance you'll be involved in an accident. But if you try to drive after 20 drinks, according to the American Insurance Association, it's a 50-50 gamble whether you and the car will get home safely. Kids today may call their dad anything from "Popsy" to "hey, you." But in early New Puritan children addressed their father as "honored sir." The lale William Randolph Hearst was a man who didn't like to be crowded. When h e went to the theater alone, he always bought two seats — one for himself, Kie other for his hat. Some octopuses are better quick-change color artists than chameleons. In the twinkling of an eye they can switch from chocolate brown to milky white or brick red. College boys now have less and less desire to become tired businessmen. Only 14 per cent pared with nearly 40 per cent of those graduating five years before. Quotable notables: "Nothing in life is to be feared. It is only lo be understood" — Marie Curie. You probably never have seen an oyster eat corn on the cob, and you probably never will, but. It has been found that small amounts of cornstarch in water help growing oysters put on from 30 to 40 per cent more meat. ULismussmcii. WIHJ AT J..V-1 vv...i. oer. e s so sae, aen as of (he 1964 graduates from Har-1 rected, it can be sold without p vard took business Jobs, as com News Of Men In Service Marine Pvt. John D. Pugh, son of Mr. and Mrs. William B. Harris of 1028 Walnut St., has completed a week of testing and screening at the Naval Air Technical Training Center, Memphis. These tests will determine Pugh's eligibility for future duty with Marine Corp aviation units. Prosperity certainly has its headaches. Americans gulped enough aspirin tablets last year to provide two a week for every man, whoman and child in the country. * * * If the United States reaches a peak population of 432 million in the year 2010 — a statistical possibility — half of all Americans will be under 25. If you spent less than $129 for medical and dental care last year, you were healthier than the average person. A Russian proverb advises: "Going to sea? Pray once. Going to war? Pray twice. Going to marry? Pray three times." Bronchial Asthma Formula Doctors Prescribe Most-Stops Choking Attacks in Minutes Opens Up Locked Bronchial Tubes and Keeps Them Open. Restores Normal Breathing Fast. Calms Panic. New York, IS.Y.-There's a bxfcht new outlook on life for asthmatics. Medical tests proved this modern formula actually ends attacks and restores normal breathing in minutes. Prompt use helps prevent severe attacks from even starting. This formula is so effective doctors prescribe it moie than any other. Yet it's so safe, taken as di- seription in most states. Just ask for Primatene® Tablets, Primatene promptly opens up locked bronchial tubes and keeps them open. Trapped air is released. You can breathe in and out .freely again. It loosens phlegm. Calms panic. Brings you back to normal fast. So look forward to freedom for hours from asthma spasms. Always carry Primntcne with you. How a Savings & Loan Association family found "a good life'.'.. read aEout it in the June 28th issue fof LOOK magazine. specled by the White Man. I'm sure he had no ideas abou' being disloyal to our Grea America!) He died, perhaps thinking this to bimself and our creator: "Lord, I gave my, all that my people shall be freed.' Citizens, I beg this of all of you - be honest with yourself — haven't you been treated with respect by most all Negroes? I have been! But they like for us to speak first. We siiould, until we let them really know and we prove lo them we, the Whites are their friends. We pray together, we fight for our country together, we work together. Why then, should our Negro have to march to prove he is an American? Our president of these United States signed the Bill of Freedom. Tbis gives every race, regardless of creed or color, if they are citizens of our country, the right to vote, to be happy - to not cry in pain and say, please help us. Let's all help by smiling, standing together to lio* with each Spec-4 James T. Holt, son of Mr. and Mrs. Leeman K. Holt of Manila, has been assigned to the 381U Artillery Brigade '~ Korea. Holt Is a 1%4 graduate Manila High School. Machinist's Mate 2-C William W. Taylor, son of Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Taylor of 1001 Hearn St., recently visited Shimoda, Japan, aboard the fleet destroyer USS Rogers. Taylor acted as an unofficial Ambassador of the United States during that city's 27th annual Black Ship Festival. Seaman Royce Ear! Willie, son of Mr. and Mrs. Dave Willie of Leachville, is serving aboard he fleet ocean tug USS Paiute. Willie's ship is a unit of the Sixth Fleet, now operating in ;he Mediterranean. Two cadets from Osceola will attend an R.O.T.C, summer camp at Fort Sill, Okla., beginning June 15. The men are Harold E. Crye of 5«7 W. Ford and Tony W. Fletcher of 412 S. Pecan. Cadet James R> Grigsby, son of Mr. and Mrs. R. R. Grigsby, 1008 W. Moultrie, will attend an R.O.T.C. summer camp at Fort Sill, Okla., beginning June 15 Grigsby is » senior at Arkansas State Collegt «f Juesboto Paul Mitchell's family knows how to handle money. Read how three generations of Mitchells found that saving makes the difference. Then come see us and start toward your ! 'good life." We're in the business of helping people help themselves. BLYTHEVILLE FEDERAL Savings & Loan Association 200 N. Second St. Phon. PO 3-4568 OF THF SAVINOS AND IOAN FOUNDATION, tfOMSOK Ot THIS AOVtRTISEMEN' ^ t "All that for a telephone call?" Southwestern Bell — Arkansas invites all Blytheville "LEhigh" telephone users to attend our open house from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesday at the Blytheville "LEhigh" telephone building. You'll see many interesting things inside this telephone building, which we feel is helping us serve our customers in Blytheville better than ever before. See the complex switching equipment that comes to life when you spin your telephone dial... learn how your calls are sent swiftly across town, or across the nation with direct distance dialing... see exactly how DDD works to help you. Free souvenirs and refreshments ,.. play Long Distance IQ ... you might even win a valuable prize simply by attending ... got the family together and drop by for a visit. That's all day Wednesday... from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m..,. at the Blytheville "LEhigh" telephone building, located just across from Gosnell School, near the entrance to the Blytheville Air Force Base. SOUTHWISTERN BELL @ ARKANSAS! Miking ulephont tervlet bttwto ttrvt yoti bett»*

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