Tucson Daily Citizen from Tucson, Arizona on March 17, 1954 · Page 3
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Tucson Daily Citizen from Tucson, Arizona · Page 3

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Tucson, Arizona
Issue Date:
Wednesday, March 17, 1954
Page:
Page 3
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* - " ' . - · Deliverable H-Bombs Officially Admitted WASHINGTON--Wl--It has now | explosion teen said officially, plainly, open- ] ly--the United States has deliverable H-bombs and the means ,of hurling them at any target in trie world. Rep. W. Sterling Cole (R-N.Y.) eaid it last night. Cole is chair- Cole told newsmen U^S. and construed as stating flatly that either country could put such weapons on a target. Last night, however, he said the TJnited States could do just that and Russia presumably could. He . man o£ the h b ouse.sTna te atomic I said President Eisenhower had energy committee. The law re- j told the United Nations this coun- qulres the atomic energy commls- i try has "hydrogen weapons, sion to keep Cole and his col- His reference was to the speech leagues f u l l y informed on all otjasi Dec, 8 m which Mr. .Eisen- n t n m l c matters hower said: atomic matieis. .. ,,.,,,,..,,, BOMBS today are more than 25 times as -powerful So Cole knew what he was talk- Inc about when he said, on the --- . , , , record, that the United States has ] as the weapons .with ^which the ·perfected the super bomb in de- atomic age dawned, while hydro- iverable form. And. it was at gen weapons are in the ranges least an "educated guess" when of millions of tons of ,TNT he added that it wag a "Fair assumption" that Russia also possesses hydrogen weapons it can deliver on target. equivalent." Informed sources said at the time that Mr. Eisenhower was referring to deliverable H-bombs. NTS were in ; Cole has now confirmed this in- replv to questions put to him on I terpretation publicly. The Presi- a television program "Dateline [dent's statement, Cole said, 'must Washington," filmed for broad- necessarily mean a hydrogen cast over station WDSU-TV in ; bomb." New Orleans. The questions were j A "deliverable hydrogen bomb asked bv Reps. Hale Boggs (D- i that can be carried to any part La ) and F. Edward Hebert (D- of the world? Hebert asked. ' ."Yes,' 1 Cole said, "if we have bases close enough to the target," Cole said the United States has Stiraan Satl.n ffifttirn ^ W«dn«id»y Evinlng, M»rch 17, 1954 La.). This country exploded the first "hydrogen device" at Eniwetok in November, 1952. Russia detonated an experimental H-bomb last Aug. 12. At the time of the Russian REMOVAL SALE CONTINUES at D A N I E L ' S . Musical POWDER BOX Regularly $5.95 $ 3' 5 Mo Charge for Credit no planes capable of making nonstop roundtrips from this country to every point in the world. But he said they can reach any target anywhere. Other sources have ssid they can do that and go Boy Tries Space Flight Out Window NEW YORK--Wl--A four-year- old boy is a pretty young lad to be tackling interplanetary travel, j but, then, a four-year-old boy is likely to tackle anything he thinks of. Anyway, It seemed pretty simple to Kenneth Ward, a 40-pound fan of TV space dramas. Some day, he kept telling his mother, he was going to take off right through the window of their second-floor Brooklyn apartment. Yesterday he did but fortunately Marilyn Schroth, a-high school junior and something of an earthy supergirl, spotted Kenneth clinging outside the window ledge some 25 feet in the air. Marilyn sprinted alony the sidewalk just as the dangling space cadet plummeted earthward. i There was quite a collision as spaceboy and supergirl met, bu.t no damages beyond scratches. [ All ended happily for everyone except Kenneth, whose moth- i er now has the fledgling inter' stellar traveller firmly tied to earth. on to landings in friendly territory beyond. THIS COUNTRY'S FIRST hydrogen explosion was some 250 times as powerful as the A-bombs of World War II which were 2,000 times as powerful as the 10-ton blockbusters of that same war. The AEC is now testing a new series of hydrogen weapons in the Pacific. The first, announced Mar.' 1, was said by informed sources to be twice as destructive as the 1952 device. Like its predecessor, it destroyed the islp on which it was exploded. At least two more shots are believed to be on the test schedule. One.may be a com bat model of. the H-bomb. Another --"the big one" of the series--is expected to dwarf the others in explosive violence. : · . Students Will Go To Europe Three Tucson high schpqrstu- dents knew today they 1 ^V going to spend part of ·their summer in Europe, while a fourth was anxiously awaiting a possible European assignment. Andy Tolson, principal, said three students have been selected by the. American Field Service office in New York to visit European families this summer. A fourth, he said, also will be going if approval is given by the Field Service and a .country found .that will accept the student. ·The s t u d e n t s , all' juniors, named byWolson, include: HELEN VOSSKUHLER, daughter of Mr, and Mrs. M. P. Voss- kuhler, 1511 E. Edison St.; Gene Yeazell, son of Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth G.' Yeazell, 1126 N. Sixth ave.; and Richard K. Young, son of Mr. and Mrs. Clifford A. Young, 3918 E. Louis lane. · Name of the fourth student who might possibly make the trip was not released. The students, who will spend the summer months with a family in the country of their choice, were recommended as candidates by a faculty committee and local Field Service officials. THEY ARE selected on ' the basis of letters from the committee, in addition to letters of application from the students themselves. The Field Service makes arrangements to have the students live with European families, but the students must pay travel expenses. At present/the local school system has two foreign students enrolled under the American Field Service international scholarship plan, They are Ursula Lucas from Duisburg, Germany, and Eric A. Struyf from Brussels, Belgium. Accidents Kill Two In State By United Press A freak accident in which a Hillsboro, Ind., man burned to death when his truck turned end- over-end a n d . a two-vehicle collision moved this yearns traffic fatalities up to S8 today in Arizona. The Arizona highway patrol identified the victims as Dorance Charles Huffman,-33, and Aurela Candelaria, 82, Albuquerque, N, M. Patrolman Charles Graham said Huffman lost eontrol r' his semi- truck-trailer while coming down a steep grade just east of Superior yesterday afternoon on highway 60-70. The truck'turned end- over-end and then burst into flame. Graham said Huffman apparently had not geared the vehicle down enough for the grade. The elderly New Mexican died Sunday at Albuquerque hospital of Injuries suffered in a two-vehicle crash about 1% miles east of Winslow early Saturday. Six other persons were hospitalized in Winslow and Albuquerque as a result of t h e accident. · _ that REUBEN'S Leads in A L L NATIONALLY K N O W N B R A N D S 2-Passenger G L I D E R SIESTA SHOWN ABOVE with Bail-Bearing Rocker Unit JIFFY! BOURBOH WHISKEY · «OTn.fO IN BOND · 100 PKXf. Dairy Controls May Be Forced · WASHINGTON -- Ifl-- Secretary of Agriculture Benson said today the. government may be forced to resort to production controls for dairy products if means cannot be found to in- crease'consumption. "The, government cannot continue to pile up dairy surpluses," he said, and cannot reduce the surpluses it now holds as' long as production exceeds demand. Benson said, however, he felt confident that consumption can be expanded, to match production if the dairy and food industries join with the government in a concerted promotion campaign. The secretary made "these comments at a news conference at which he said.his.department expects to set up a "pilot plan" in .one or-..more major consuming areas by April 1 to experiment with schemes for funhel- ing present .government-owned surpluses of butter and. .cheese onto American dinner tables. '.. Details of this plan arid areas; to be covered will be announced later. The department is known, however, to be considering various plans for selling surplus- dairy products to consumers at cut rate prices. . 42 MOVE IT WHERE YOU WANT IT IN Aluminum outdoor furniture by Lawnlite is dual-use furniture. Because of its smart, colorful styling, it's "in place" inside your home .«. . and in the garden, patio or anywhere outside it adds that desirable tropical touch. We picture here only a few of the pieces that we are now showing of this nationally advertised line. Light as a Feather ALUMINUM END TABLE 4»*, *·'·* ^ «f i ALUMINUM CHAISE comfortable as your bed ADJUSTABLE BACK First broadcast of a political convention was the national Republican meet held in Cleveland in June 1924. THE CHAIR WITH You Feel Like You're In thil light, airy, restful Chair PEEL CHAIRS CASH AND CARRY N0 PHONE ORbERS A MUST FOR YOUR This wonderful new chaise by Hampden is the lightest, most comfortable and lowest priced aluminum frame chaise on the market today. New back adjusts easily to desired position. Full, plump sailcloth covered innerspring mattress it made to provide maximum comfort. Mattress colors --Red, Green, Yellow. . Come in soon to you'll be sure to gel your favorite color. PORCH--LAWN--SUNROOM Seat and back made of 12 or. water-repellent, vat-dyed duck in brilliant Summer Colors. Baked enamel metal frames with reinforced braces. Mb wooden parts to warp or wobble. HAMPDEN Weight only 12 Ibs. Folds compactly as .shown. Come in NOW and choose from our large display, CHAIRS Garden Hose Gave on ithls Spring value-extra sturdy construction-25 Ft,...... $3,98 50Ft. $6.98 CONSULT WITH OUR DECORATOR THERE IS NO CHARGE FOR THIS SERVICE WE ARE OPEN FRIDAY AND SATURDAY TIL 940 P.N I 177-193 W. Congress Phone 3-2511 4 Reuben Gold, President The Home J/,°y« 97.000 Satisfied Curto

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