The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on June 14, 1966 · Page 9
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 9

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Blytheville, Arkansas
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Tuesday, June 14, 1966
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Page 9
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Blythevfll* (Art) Courier New» - TuMday, June 14, UN - Pip Nbt AL DAVIS SCUTTLED — IN THt NAMt OF PC ACE Story Behind Merger By MURRAY OLDERMAN •' NEW YORK - (NBA) • The American Football ' League will inexorably lose its identity In the peace agreement reached between • the two professional leagues until, by 1970, it dissolves into the "new National Foot"ball League." '' f It wasn't a merger. It was * an absorption. » Lamar Hunt of Kansas I City, representing the AFL, * didn't carry a stiletto into »the negotiation sessions with »Tex Schramm, his vis-a-vis R for the NFL. He carried an " umbrella. » * * * * The agreement doesn't ^specify the AFL will exist *as a unit when amalgama- !J tion is complete in four K years. It can be hacked up * and divided equally between «the Eastern and Western !{Conferences of the NFL, if £ that's the way Commission- u er Pete Rozelle wants it in ? 1970, much like the old AU* America Conference was. ;' If the Justice Department * indicates the merger is in r trouble on antitrust grounds, I before ". the ' 1968 season . (when, incidentally, the :, NFL television contract •» comes up for renewal), the T whole deal cancels out and * the AFL returns to a clearly L subservient position as a "minor league. * In the meantime, the NFL ."has neatly isolated its old "rival by banning trades, »waiver deals and inter- jj league regular season play. •i The only concession the J| NFL made for peace was "the staging of a champion',1 ship game. '» "It wasn't a merger," ., said Al Davis, the commis- '< sioner of the AFL. Al Davis Davis' reaction was subjective, too, because in the merger he was squeezed out of his equal status with Rozelle. He quit- rather than accept a reduced role. But his bitterness derived from, the fact that he believed the AFL went into the bargaining sessions from a position of strength and didn't come out with an equal deal. From the start,' it was clear the NFL insisted on an indemnity as the price for peace. The AFL sent Hunt into the final peace sessions agreed that it would offer no money at first, but would negotiate and possibly retrieve the money it would get from an expansion franchise. Instead, Hunt took the bait as offered by the NFL—$18 million over 20 years as an Hunting Change - LITTLE ROCK - Hugh Hackler, director of the Arkansas » Game and Fish Commission has announced a major change *• in the regulations on hunting predators and other unprotected * species of birds and animals which was adopted by the * G&FC at its June 7 meeting. Effective June 15-crows, hawks, owls, English sparrows, !_ starlings wolves bobcats coyotes groundhogs gophers, nutria, 'I muskrats and beaver can be hunted at anytime of the year » from SUNRISE to SUNSET only. • They may be hunted with shotguns, rifles, handguns, pel- „ let guns and longbows and arrows. Any type of ammunition J; may be used. All other animals and birds may never be hunted or killed '„ except during an open season as declared or set by the Ar- knasas Game and Fish Commission. Violations may result » in fines from ?100 to $500. J Predator calls—mechanical, battery powered, and mouth i calls may be used in predator hunting. ' Previously this year only crows could be hunted during * the interim between hunting seasons. I When questioned on the reasons for this change Hackler ; stated: "The Commission realized that they had taken the , rights of the predator hunter away from him and they wish to ". restore them." » * » y Motorboat Reminder •• OWNERS OF BOATS EQUIPPED WITH MOTORS OF » more than 10 horsepower are reminded of the annual renewal I required before July 1. Renewals cost only $1 and can be - secured in person or by mail through the various County Revi enue Collectors' offices in each county. Registration for new ; boats costs $2. .1 The law requires that boat owners either paint or firmly '. attach the registration number on both forward sides of the > boat.-where it can easily be seen. The numbers can be of any "„ color so long as they contrast with the color of the boat and ;; provide good legibility. The number must read from left to « right, with letter groups separated from numerals by hyphens ; or space such as AR-213-PU or AR 213 PU. ;• If you've purchased a used boat with a number already * assigned, the boat registration must be transferred to the ; new owner's name and must be obtained within 15 days after ~ the purchase date. The permit costs $1. If a certificate number is lost—a common occrrence at renewal time—a renewal certificate is available for $1 and may be obtained only between July 1 and July 15 for this amount. At any other time the certificate renewal costs $2. * * * Owners of boats that are destroyed or abandoned are also required by law to notify the County Revenue Collector's office so that the boat number can be cancelled. - The Game and Fish Commission has available at no charge a booklet, "Arkansas Boat Owners Guide," that in question-answer form provides answers to the most frequently asked questions concerning compliance with the numbering, registration, and safety laws. Stocking Walleye MORE THAN A MILLION. WALLEYE FRY WERE stocked in Lake Ouachita in early May, and another million walleye were deposited in Lake Greeson by personnel of the Fisheries Division. The walleye were released in the upper end of the main arm of Lake Ouachita, near Twin Creeks access area, Access area, Housley Point, 'the confluence of the main fork, south- fork and northfork arms of the lake, the fish were obtained by the commission from the State of Nebraska. Stocking at take Greeson, formerly Lake Narrows, was carried out in the Cowhide Cove arm, and from Bear Creek arm to the main channel. Walleye stocking in the big lakes up to this point has been centered around Lakes Norfork, Bull Shoals, Beaver and Green Ferry. Lake Ouachita was stocked with two mil- Boo in Ma? el MM, Indemnity, plus whatever price was paid for the AFL expansion franchise. He did it because he knew he had the necessary six .votes to approve the deal in his pocket and could ignore the instructions. * * + Barron Hilton of San Diego, Gerry Phipps of Denver, Billy Sullivan of Boston and Joe Robbie of Miami were solidly aligned with Hunt. Sonny Werblin of New York, Bud Adams of Houston and Wayne Valley of Oakland wanted peace on equal terms or they'd continue the fight. The lever was controlled by Ralph Wilson of Buffalo, a strong man in the league and originally aligned with the "fight" group. Wilson swung in with Hunt at the last minute becausa he felt a merger, even at NFL terms, was good business. There was no actual league vote. The morning of the merger, Valley of Oakland didn't know about it and hadn't been consulted. They can rationalize the apparently large price of peace. The indemnity deal breaks down to $100,000 annually per club and half of that represents interest, so that it actually costs them only $50,000 a year out of pocket because of tax benefits. * + * "We give rookies more than that," said Billy Sullivan, president of the Boston Patriots. "One exhibition game against the Colts will pick us up the $100,000," said Ralph Wilson, the Buffalo owner. A year ago, the leagues were ready to get together for a $12,500,000 indemnity spread over five years. "That would have cost us $300,000 a year," Sullivan said. "Because of the compound interest, this is better for us." * + * When the peace talks first opened in April, on the eve of Davis' appointment as commissioner, the NFL proposed this plan: The San Diego Chargers to move to New Orleans, the Los Angeles Rams to move to San Diego, the New York Jets to move to L.A. and the Oakland Raiders to move to Seattle. The AFL went ahead and hired Davis anyhow. "Because there had been talks before," explained Hunt, "and they always broke down." That accelerated the costly talent battle, on both a rookie and veteran level, which hurt the owners where they're most vulnerable—in their profit statements. * * * Now, ostensibly, they're happy. "Best thing that ever happend in sports," -said Carroll Rosenbloom of Baltimore. "No more phones in locker rooms far players to contact then: stock brokers." It's clear now that when Hunt and the other AFL millionaires hired Al Davis to be their hatchet-man commissioner some 60 days before the truce, they weren't really spoiling for a fight They were looking for the gimmick to convince the NFL it would be more profitable for both sides to anoint each other with olive branches. The NFL, smartly, grabbed the biggest branch. Signed by Astros HOUSTON (AP) - The Houston Astros have signed Richard Lynn, third baseman from Edwardsville, 111., who was the seventh selection in the recent free agent draft, the National League club said Monday. Lynn, 18, is the fifth of the top nine draft selections the Astros have signed this year, a spokesman said. iBOWUNQ DENNIS WARMS UP LONDON (AP) - Dennis Ralston, leading American contender for next week's Wimbledon tennis tournament, tuned up Monday with a 6-3, 7-5 victory over Japan's Osamu Ishiguro— but he wag way below hit best form. Foy Etchieson delivered 540 in Industrial Summer League last night at-Shamrock. Harok Sandbothe batted 512; and Rus sell Downing 502. Second-place Shamrock Lanes No. 2 twirlet 599; and fifth-place Randall Company 1691. Ruth Gregg scooped 235-546 in Monday Night Ladies League. Ann Webb speared 522; Myrtle Thomas 222-509; Lounell Jones and Jerry Kitchens 192s. Third- place Team Number Five fired 510; and league-leading Number Three 1427. * * * Jim Corser pegged 533; Chuck Marlow 220; K. C. Brown 219; Charlotte Valentine 500; Lavonne Bats 484; Barb Larson 190; and Irma Mann 188 in Monday Night 9 O'clock Mixed Doubles League at Strat-0- Lanes. Because of a resurfacing job at Strat-0, this league bowled over the weekend. Paul Hein picked 6-7-10. INDUSTRIAL SUMMER Points 120 Katz Jewelers .... . Shamrock Lanes No. 2 Shamrock Lanes No. 1 .... 97 Coca - Cola ......;....-..;.. 93 Randall Company :... B2y, Johnson's ESBO 80 " Montgomery Ward ....- 63^ MOM. NIGHT LADIES W L Number 3 20 4 Number 4 14 10 Number 5 14 10 Number 6 12 12 Number 1 8 16 Number 2 4 20 9 O'CLOCK MIXED DOUBLES W L Boone Cleaners No. 2 19 .9 WOSCO 18 10 Minlt Mart 18- 10 C-BB , 16 12 Runamucks 14 14 Sorry-Bout-That 14 - 14 Soone Cleaners No. 1 13 13 tate Farm Insurance 12 16 Mustangs 10 18 ilowpokes 6 22 Pro Wrestling at Legion Arano, 8:30 Billy and Red Better Be Friends Tonight Bill Wicks feels he might have a better chance tonight. The popular blond blaster from Memphis is teamed with none other than Rowdy Red Roberts in the tag team main event at Legion Arena. Opponents are crafty Tamaya Soto and Tojo Yamamoto. The two Japanese stars were defeated last week by Wicks and Dynamite Laye—but by disqualification. * * * Tojo applied a pile drive on Laye and that finished him for the night. There was some question about whether or not the driver is legal in Arkansas. In any event, state commissioner Marshall Blackard disqualified the Japs and gave the decision to Wicks and Dynamite. However, Dynamite couldn't enjoy it: he had to be helped from the ring. Billy and Red do .not have the reputation of being good friends in the ring but they'll no doubt be leaning on each other rather heavily tonight against the infuriating pair from Japan. * * * The main event is listed for 60 minutes or less, best-ofr three. In the opener, also with a one-hour limit, promoter Herb "" Welch has booked Ted McCarthy, 220, against Luke Graham, 260. "This will be a trial for Ted, too," the promoter said. "I don't think he's ever fought any one as rough as Graham." Big Luke separates the boys from the men in a hurry. Sometimes he even separates the men. .. . . * * * Admissions are 75 cents, 25 cents for children. Ringside reserved chairs may be purchased Inside the Arena. Dud Cason Post 24 of the American Legion is sponsor First bell at 8:30. ; , MAJOR LEAGUE STANDINGS NATIONAL LEAGUE San Fran. .. .os Angeles Pittsburgh . Phila. louston .. St. Louis . Atlanta .. Cincinnati Vew York Chicago W. L. 36 23 34 23 33 23 33 24 32 26 26 29 Pet. G.B. .610 .596 1 .589 ' 1% .579 2 .552 .473 .443 3% 8 10 .426 .404 .309.. 10V 2 17 New York at Atlanta, N Philadelphia at Cincinnati 2, twi-night Pittsburgh at St. Louis, N Chicago at Los Angeles, N Houston at San Francisco AMERICAN LEAGUE Monday's Results San Francisco 8, Chicago 0 New York 5-1, St. Louis 2-4 Philadelphia 6-6, Atlanta 2-4 Pittsburgh 5, Cincinnati 4 Houston 9, Los Angeles 6, 11 innings Today's Games St. .Louis at New York Atlanta at Philadelphia, N Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, N Houston at Los Angeles, N Chicago at San Francisco Wednesday's Games Cleveland Baltimore Detroit Minnesota California Chicago .. New York . Kansas City Washington Boston Soap Box Derby Date Changed Because of conflicting activi- ies, Blytheville Jaycees have lecided to change their annual Soap Box Derby to July 17. "There is no charge to enter he derby," director - Richard ^Jokes pointed out, "and tin wheels and axles are furnishei ach entrantiby the Jaycees." Boys 11 through 15 may enter iy signing up at Bob Sullivan Chevrolet-Cadillac but they mus be accompanied by a parent 01 guardian. + * * "We have the wneels and axles n stock," Nokes noted. "Boys ivho have registered may pick The Bears-Tigers game, slated esterday at Federal Compress "ield, was postponed because .of ain. A doubleheader is booked to- ight at Light Brigade Field. iams vs. Eagles at 6 and Owls s. Wings at 8:30. Wednesday afternoon it's Bears and Eagles at Pony Park at 5. Blytheville Little League games washed out I*st night have been moved up to Wednesday night: Rotary vs. North 61 at 6:30; and American Legion vs. Kiwanis at 8. Tonight: Kiwanis vs. Randall at 6:30; and Lions vs. Ark-Mo at 8. You'll Enjoy It's Highly Contagious" But you will for* every minute ot it. See one of our Salts- men for your Swing fever Dea/7 They're Greet. I SAM BLACK MOTOR COMPANY OWi-GMC Trucks SITE.Main-PO 2-2056 them up at any time." A derby inspection is scheduled this Saturday morning, 11 o'clock, at the Jaycees building on N. Second. Racers already built or being built are to be check at this time. "This is also a good time for boys who are considering to enter the competition to come by to check for ideas about design and construction," Nokes suggested. w. 34 37 34 27 23 26 24 22 23 20 Pet. G.B. .654 H .649 .618 .500 .491 .481 .453 .407 13 .390 15 .364 '16 2 8% 9 9% 11 Monday's Results Detroit 4, Washington 3 Baltimore 8, -New York 0 Kansas City 5-1, Minnesota 2- Chicago 5-1, California 1-2 Boston at Cleveland, postponed, rain Today's Games Minnesota at Kansas City, N California at Chicago Washington at Detroit, N' Boston'at Cleveland, 2, twi- night New York at Baltimore, N Wednesday's Games California at Minnesota 2, twi- night Kansas City at Chicago 2, twi- night Baltimore at Washington, N Cleveland at New York,. N Detroit at Boston, N Amarillo ... Albuquerque ARKANSAS El Paso ... Austin Dal-FW .... TEXAS LEAGUE W. L. Pet. GB 35 23 .603 .552 .534 .474 .421 .414 11 Monday's Results Albuquerque 5, Amarillo 1 Dallas-Fort Worth 4-2, Austin 3-3 Tuesday's Games Austin at ARKANSAS Amarillo at Dallas-Fort Worth' Only games scheduled INTERNATIONAL Buffalo 4, Richmond 3 Columbus 9, Rochester 2 Syracuse 7, Toledo 5 Jacksonville at Toronto, postponed, rain PACIFIC COAST Portland 6, Denver 3 Phoenix at Indianapolis, post- xined, rain San Diego at Spokane, postponed, wet grounds Tulsa 8, Vancouver 6 Hawaii 3, Oklahoma City 1 Only games scheduled FALSE TEETH That Loosen Need Not Embarrass Mm? weiren ot filM tteth h»« •uffered.real embarrassment because their plate dropped, slipped or wobbled at just the wrong; time. Do not live In fear of thU happening to you. Just sprinkle a little- PASTEETH, the alkaline (non-acid) powder, on S our plates. Hold false teeth mora rmly. ao they feel more comfortable. Does not sour. Checlu "platfl odor breath". Get FASTEETS at aVuc cnunten ivtrywhKt. Tray Power Hits El Paso LITTLE ROCK (AP) - The Arkansas Travelers used some of that hitting power they lacked early in the season Monday night and shellacked El Paso 8-1 in Texas League baseball. The Travelers collected 10 nits off the Suns, including Larry Stubing's 10th homer of the season, while Frank Montgomery held the visitors to five bits. Don Furnald's home run ia the seventh accounted for the Suns' solo score. * * * El Paso 000000100-1 5 4 Arkansas Oil 130 02X-8 10 6 Sherrod, Gatewood (4), Mosely (5), and Egari; Montgomery, and Zeller. W — Montgomery (5-6). L-Sherrod (2-4). GIFT WRAPPED FOR DAD JUNE 19 KING EDWARD CIGARS AMERICA'S LARGEST SELLING BRAND You are seeing Jim's second graduation with "honors" Tonight your newapaperboy receives a diploma for completing the scholastic requirements of hit echooL It is a big night for him, his parents and bis friends. Jim is also a graduate in management. This experience as a Junior Independent Merchant taught him ••• the value of money ...by having him collect it and keep an. accounting record of it; the need for promptness and giving service...without which he finds bis business ia soon in deep trouble; the importance of getting along with aQ Jpndji of people... for they are his customers; the art of salesmanship...by which ha increases his bnsmesB and profit and acquires poise and confidence. Whether Jim goes to •ollefe er trade school... joins the Armed Forces or gets a job... his training aa a Newspaperboy givee him a tremendous advantage ovar boys who graduate only in book learning. There are more ertea-corricular activity demands made op today's young men than ever before. Most of them are .good. But if you are sincerely interested in having your son build a solid foundation which Witt help him immeasurably in tomorrow'* space age competition for success, find out what today's newspaper mot* inaTuitenynt can mean to him. Our Circulation Department win be glad to set up an appointment with you and your son if you wffl writs or phone. Blytheville Courier News

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