The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on June 14, 1966 · Page 5
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 5

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Blytheville, Arkansas
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Tuesday, June 14, 1966
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Page 5
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465 Viet Cong Wiped Out As Week-Long Fight Rages By ROBERT TUCKMAN SAIGON, South Viet Nam (AP) — American paratroopers clashed again today with North Vietnamese troops on jungle ridges in South Viet Nam's central highlands 35 miles north of Kontum. A U.S. military spokesman said units of the 101st Airborne Division engaged a company- size force — about 100 men — in a fresh outbreak of the battle of the ridges. The latest clash continued through the afternoon, but the spokesman said he had not word on the outcome. He reported the Communist toll so far in the week-long fighting rose to 465 killed, or about half of the North Viet- namese 24th Regiment which | when the Navy jets appeared. was reported on the ridges when the battle started last Tusday. Ovr the North Viet Nam coast, two U.S. Navy F4C Phantom jets from the aircraft carrier Ranger intercepted two propeller-driven planes and probably shot down one of them with a radar-guided Sparrow missile. The encounter took place before dawn 18 miles northeast of Thanh Hoa, 90 miles south of Hanoi. In the darkness the Phantom pilots could not precisely identify the enemy planes, but from their low speed and shape as well as radar contacts judged them to be propeller-driven, a Navy spokesman said. They took evasive action One Phantom fired the Sparrow from several miles away. An explosion was seen and one enemy plane disappeared from th radar screens of the Phantoms and th U.S. missile frigate Coontz, which had guided the U.S. jets. The second plane was tracked heading inland. Except for the fightin gnorth of Kontum near the Laotian border, only light scattered ground action was reported in South Viet Nam. The U.S. Command disclosed that the American 173rd Airborne Brigade had launched a new search-and-destroy opera tion named Hollandia last Wednesday but so far had made little contact with the Viet Cong. The sweep was under way in coastal Phuoc Tuy Province east of Saigon. A spokesman reported one Viet Cong killed and four captured. American pilots flew 60 multi- plane missions over North Viet Nam Monday concentrating on coastal targets near Vinh, Thanh Hoa and Dong Hoi and island near the Mu Gia Pass en the Laotian border. Over South Viet Nam, U.S. pilots flew 337 combat sorties and Vietnamese pilots 272 Monday. Police Get 6 kales Protests to Erupt Over Court Ruling By JAMES MARLOW Associated Press News Analyst WASHINGTON (AP) - Another storm seems certain to break over the Supreme Court for a decision it gave Monday, one of its most far-reaching and historic. Under it the right of an individual not to incriminate him- telf has been extended and strengthened as never before. But, as a result of it, far fewer people held as criminal suspects will admit anything; police therefore will have to work a lot harder solving crimes, and perhaps fewer of them will be solved. In a 5-4 decision, written by Chief Justice Earl Warren, the court laid down these rules which police must follow scrupulously before attempting to question an arrested suspect: 1. He must be told he has the right to stay silent. 2. He must be told anything he says may be used against him in court. 3. He must be told he has the right to have an attorney with him before any questioning. 4. He must be told that, if he wants an attorney but can't afford one, an attorney will be provided for him free. 5. If, after being told all this, an arrested suspect says he does not want a lawyer and Is willing to be questioned, he may be, provided he reached his decision "knowingly and intelligently." 6. If, after being told all his rights, a suspect agrees to be questioned, he can shut off the questions any time after they have started, whether or not he j has an attorney with him. i * » « ' Rule No. 5's requirement — that a voluntary confession or statement can stand up in court only if made "knowingly and intelligently" — will no doubt be the basis for countless appeals from future convictions. The court bases its decision on the Constitution's Fifth Amendment which says "no person ... shall be compelled in any criminal case to be a witness against himself," which means he can't be compelled to incriminate himself. Justice John M. Harlan, one jof the four justices who disagreed with the decision, dissent- I ed in very strong language. In part he said: "I believe the 1 decision of the court represents poor constitutional law and entails harmful consequences for the country at large. The thrust | of the new rules is ultimately to i discourage any confession at Nau Of Men In Service Alter 10 Minutes Court Finds Ruby Sane "We do know that some crimes cannot be solved without confessions. The court is taking a real risk with society's welfare in imposing its new regime on the country. "The social costs of crime are too great to call the new rules anything but a hazardous experimentation." Two years ago the Supreme Court overturned the conviction of Danny Escobedo for murder after, Warren said, police got a confession from him in a police station, the result of questioning him four hours without advising him of his right to say nothing and of his right to consult with | an attorney. This decision caused a storm by itself. "A spirited legal debate," Warren called it. It raised the question of how much further the court might still go in protecting criminal suspects and how far police could go in questioning them. The attorneys general of 27 states urged the court not to put further limits on questioning suspects in criminal cases. Monday's decision was he court's answer, spelled out in detail. Warren said the court encourages Congress and state legisla- ;ures to develop their own safeguards against self-incrimina- ion by criminal suspects. But the chief justice indicated such safeguards won't stand up jefore the Supreme Court unless they are as effective as the rules laid down Monday. And, of course, the Supreme Court will do the deciding on whether they Airman 3-C Jimmy Bohannon has returned to his post at Barksdale AFB, La., after a visit with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Boharman, of 215 S. Ruddle Rd. Bohannan is a 1964 graduate of Blytheville High School. Allen D. Baker, son of William M. Baker of Blytheville, has been promoted to Sic. -in Vietnam, where he is serving with the 299th Engineer Battalion. Baker entered tbt Army in 1953. Seaman Recruit Dwight R. Watson, son of Mr. and Mrs. Lamar R. Watson of Blytheville, is undergoing seven weeks of basic training at the Naval Training Center at San Diego. Upon completion of r e c r u i t training, Watson will be re-assigned to a school, shore station or ship. By TOM JOHNSON DALLAS, Tex. (AP)-The Jack Ruby murder case, plagued by legal complications and wrangles among defense lawyers, appears finally to he •n its way to the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals. Ruby's conviction and death sentence for the Nov. 24, 196, killing of Lee Harvey Oswald has not yet technically progressed beyond the trial court level. Oswald was named by the Warren Commission as the assassin of President John F. Kennedy. Kennedy was shot Nov. 22, 1963. * * , * But one major obstacle to the movement of Ruby's trial was removed Monday when a Dallas District Court jury ruled that the 55-year-old former strip joint operator was legally sane. The Texas Court of Criminal Appeals — the highest court in the state for noncivil cases-had indicated that it would not take up the appeal of the murder conviction until the sanity issue was settled. Ruby was convicted of murder March 14, 1964, in the same coiirt- Criminal District Court. No. 3-that adjudged him sane. The defense, claiming that Ruby was insane, had requested • unity hearing a month after the conviction. It was repeatedly delayed for various reasons. The Texas appeals court, ordered May 18 that Ruby's sanity be judicially determined without delay. It took a seven-man five-woman jury only 10 minutes Monday to rule that Ruby was sane. * * * The defense last Friday had asked that the sanity trial be put off. Reasons given were that such a proceeding at this time would violate Ruby's constitutional rights and would only serve to slow the appeal of the murder conviction. But Judge Louis Holland denied formal motions to that effect Monday and the jury panel was selected and sworn in 42 minutes. The state chose 12 jurors and put on five witnesses four jailers and the jail doctor to back up its contention that Ruby is of sound mind. Ruby himself took the witness stand for one minute during the trial to say: "Never at any time have I tried to make anyone believe that I was of unsound mind. I never tried to camouflage my mental capat ities." The defense put on no witnesses, conducted no cross-e* animation and gave no final ar< guments. By lines ...By You (EDITORS NOIE: Thin column is for use by the readers. Material submitted will not be returned. All material should be typed and double-spaced and IB subject to editing. Writers should r 'gn their names and. In the cues ot students, should give their age. Names wLU be withheld on request.) A Day in June A day in June Is like perfume. The sweet smell'of honey. The bird's a singing Mom's a ringing The dinner bell for me. A day in June Has a tune That nobody cannot sing. But a day will come When God will open The golden stairs With a hum Of love. Leda Crotts Age 13 Nikita Khrushchev By JAMES MARLOW Associated Press News Analyst WASHINGTON (AP) - A chunky, bald man, showing his 72 years, drove up to a Moscow voting place in a chauffuer-driv- en car with his wife and a bodyguard, cast his ballot, and left without cheers or catcalls. Sunday was the first time Nikita Khrushchev, living on a pension now, had appeared in public since he voted last year. He is as close to being anonymous as the present Soviet leaders can make him. Being forced to live out his life in obscurity, since the new bosses bounced him as the No. 1 man in October 1964, may seem harsh. But almost certainly it is more than Stalin would have permitted. That he can go on living at all after' losing in the Soviet power struggle is as good testimony as any to the change he wrought in the Soviet Union and, as a result, in the world. * * » Thus his present obscurity is only temporary, even though it lasts his lifetime. But his exact place in history is not at all certain since it will depend upon what eventually happens to communism. He was not an innovator in the field of tangibles, like Stalin who drove and dragged the Soviet Union into the atomic and space age and, at frightful cost in lives and luxury, gave it industry. Khrushchev's contribution, over the 10 years in which he dominated most of Communism, was in the field of the spirit, which may seem an odd word to associate with a man so earthy, tempestuous and unpredictable. Stalin was totaly dedicated to the triumph of the Communist state, no matter the cost to the people in it. Khrushchev rendered such Red fanatisicm ludicrous and obscene when he revealed Stalin as a monster and murderer. Khrushchev didn't lessen the importance of the state. But he made life and people more important than Stalin could have imagined or tolerated by relaxing the cold war inside and outside of the Soviet.Union. Inside, the people, harassed less by the secret police, could breathe a little freer, could express a little discontent, even though timidly, while the state paid more attention to their needs and their comforts. Outside, there were thunderclaps. Red China broke with the Kremlin. Unrest bubbled through the satellites and is not ended. There was an uprising in Blyfheville (Ark.) Courier News — Tuesday, June 14, 1968 - Page Plvt- Nikita Gave The Russians Spirit i Poland. The revolt in Hungary was too much for Krushchev, who crushed it. Communist parties in the non-Communist world were affected and Reds everywhere examined their old attitudes or adopted new ones. Khrushchev sometimes bumbled, sometimes stumbled, sometimes took wild chances and lost on them, as when he put missiles in Cuba. Yet through it all he melted the cold war a great deal, tried to get along better with the West, signed the limited nuclear test ban treaty and lived to see his successors follow much of his policy. * * * If he had been Stalin he would have been prepared when his friends, or enemies, turned on him and threw him out. He would have crushed them. They accused him of mishandling the dispute with China, of mismanaging the Soviet economy, of bungling the Cuban crisis and even of supporting a "cult of personality." He probably was a poor manager but at his particular moment in Soviet history he gave his people something that would have been inevitable sooner or later after the Weak and homl-' cidal years of Stalin. '...:. ^". He gave them a strong change" of spirit which his successor! inherited. The Russin peoplt are better off than they ever were, the split with China ii deeper, and the cold war is still '. muted. LABOR WANTED Men 22 to 65 Years of Age, For 5 MonthC Ditch Clearing Program. Minimum Salary. No Experience Required. THIS IS A CRASH PROGRAM AND MUST BEGIN AT ONCE Register At The Employment Security at 111 East Ash Street Blythcvilie, Or At The Wei- fare Office/ Next Door To The Jail In Osceola. ::: yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yi yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes ye yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes ye yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yi yes yes ye yes yes yes yes yes yes yes y< yes yes ye yes yes yes yes yes yes yes y« yes yes ye yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yi yes yes ye yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes ye yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes ye yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes ye yes yes yes yes yes ye; yes yes ye yes yes yes yes yes yes' yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes y< yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes ye! yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes y yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yi yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes, yes yi yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yi yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes ye; yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes ye» yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes'yes yes yes yes yes yes yes'yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes ye; : yes yes y«s yes yes yes yes yei yes yes « yes yes ye yes yes yes yes yes yes ye yet yes yes yes yes yes yei yes yes yes ye yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes s ye yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yei yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes 'es yes yes yes es yes yes yes yes yes yes [ss yes yes yes !es yes yes yes r es yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes 'es yes yes yes yes res yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes ye* yes yes yes,yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes ,s yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yea yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yei yes yes ye$ yes ye* yei y« ye* ye« ye* yes yea yes ye* ye* yes yes yes yes ye* yes yen yes yes yes yes yes ye* yes yes yes yes yes yei yes yei yes yet yei ye* yes yes yes yes ye* y« yes ye* ye* ye* yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes ye* ye* ye* yes ye* yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yet ye* yes yes yes ye* ye* yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yei yes yes yes yes ye* yea yes yes yes ye* yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes ye* y«s yes yes yes yes yea yes yes yes yea yes yes yes yes yes yes yet yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes ye* yes ye* yes yes yes yes yes yei yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes.yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes ye* yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yei yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes .yes yee yes yes y« ye* yes yes! yesLajthousand times yes! 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