Del Rio News Herald from Del Rio, Texas on January 21, 1964 · Page 1
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Del Rio News Herald from Del Rio, Texas · Page 1

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Del Rio, Texas
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Tuesday, January 21, 1964
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Page 1
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Microfilm |»,0« Box 8066 fcallaa* ft DHL ttiO, 1-EXAS, TUfiSUAIf attle < . & .^^ ^igu . *. ,; 5c Copy * • m NUMBER 214 GETTING READY—Ty Smith, left, son of Mr. and Mrs, Homer A. Smith, 1401 North Main, cords his one year old Suffolk Rambouillet cross lamb for the 23rd Val Verde Livestock Show and Sale. The show will be held here Friday and Saturday at the Fair Grbunds. Assisting Ty is Steve Kudenka, son of Mr. and Mrs. R. E. Kubenka, 1607 Avenue D. (News-Herald Photo) Defense Withdraws -. •£ •'•• '<$\$ • • *• _ •' ' ' ->47,..v_ • • ,- « Effort to'Free Ruby -*• . T ., , (AP)- Jack Ruby's defense withdrew today its'' at'' tempt to free ori bond the killer of President Kennedy's accused assassin because the court agreed to appoint a disinterested psychiatrist to examine him. The defense said a psychiatrist examination was the purpose of the attempt to have Ruby released on bond. Attorney Tom Howard told the court the defense was dismissing the original writ of ha- Around Town By IMA JO] FLEETWOOO JAMiS HA&AWI, SWISS vice consul of Jordan, and his brother, Sami Hadawi, director of the Arab Information Office In Dallas, were recent guests of beas corpus hearing at this time Fernest and Kay Taylor. Kay | without prejudice. He said this knew 1 James Hadawi "from the | was being done even though an good old days of Jerusalem— j acquaintance of chief defense he was my neighbor for years i attorney M c I v 1 n Belli had of- and had lost his home too dur-1 f ere d to posit the $100,000 bond, ing the partition o f Palestine. I Howard described the court's He was touring the United' appointment of a psychiatrist as States, fascinated by all he saw, .. an extremely significant devel and found the people in t b e opm ent in Texas jurispru fl A* *•«»_»_ lit 4.1 1 r . • • • H.I1 dence." He praised both Dist. Atty. Henry Wade and Dist. Judge Joe B. Brown tor their cooperation. Howard noted that both the state and the defense had agreed that psychiatric examination was necessary in the case. Ruby broke Into tears when newsmen asked him how he felt about the assassination. The questioning was permitted at the defense table just before Ruby's bond hearing was resumed. Described Monday by defense witnesses as a man unaware of his actions when he shot Oswald. Ruby is charged with murder with malice. His lawyers are seeking his release on bond on grounds that he was temporarily Insane and therefore .could not tell right front wrong. ; "I can't understand how a great man like that could ••$ be lost," Ruby cried as newshieri asked him his feelings about the President's death. He bit hard on bis lower Up. At that point, defense attorneys Melvln Belli and Joo Ton- ahiii asked that the questioning be dropped. As to Oswald. Ruby said: "I never saw him or knew him in my life." He was also asked, about a trip to Cuba he made in 1959, approximately nine months after Prime Minister Fidel Castro took ; over fee, government The visit was wought pu| in teatl- Southern States like those in the Holy Land, warmly friendly and generous in hopitality. He was anxious to see cowboys. After he took a walk in front of the motel, he came running to me very excited, saying, 'Kay Kay, I saw three cowboys and spoke to them — not only one but three.' He was so happy— Uic way he rushed in to give me the news, I thought he had won a million dollars." » * » • MR. ANQ MRS. PABLO AR- redondo accompanied their daughters, Dolores and Olga Arredondo. to Dallas to attend the annual Texas Beauty Show through January 22. They plan to be back in Del Rio January 23 after seeing new spring and summer hair styling trends . STOOL, EARLY-DAY merchant who loyeS IGfjBl Rio despite years of residence In Beverly HJUs, California, returned home ajte^l/vis here with his son and daughter-in-law, Bill and Helen Stool, and other relatives, he left he taid he hopes to mate more frequent visits to pel Rio in the 'future; toot many changes are being made to keep up with during infrequent visits. ., ' THi SOUTHERN PACIFIC Credit Union will meet tonight at 7:30 O'clock in the Blue Flamo Room. W.B. Stavley is president of the union. » * • * SIS ICHIU.ICK treatment in the Methodls Hospital in San Antonio, She went to San Antonio Sunday and is in Room 1432,;.Friends here said Sis did not undergo surgery Jt»ut ia |«kjto||4reat- ments. ""'-* " '"•"" s Sit AROUHP TOWN-P49* JA IS UNDER Methodist has aa«Mt wi)i, ask for,, and a change of venue. Asked specifically about testimony Monday that he intended to sell jeeps to Cuba, Ruby said: "I didn't sell any jeeps." Ruby said he did try to contact a person who knew Castro well, but he did not explain why he tried to do that. "As a matter of fact, they (the Cubans) interrogated me as if I was working against them," Ruby said. "To be perfectly honest, I was just trying to get out of the beer business." He added that I meant he was looking for a 1 "business opportunity." The 60-seat courtroom and its 12-seat jury box both were packed as the hearing resumed. A psychiatrist and a psychologist, both called by the defense, testified Monday they believe Ruby Is afflicted with an organic brain disorder. The psychologist said he was capable of "impulsive mental explosions" when under "strong emotional stress mony Monday. "It seeme4 }lk« the U.S. was In good harmony 'with Cuba then," Ruby said. "I was just vacationing down there for a few days.'* Joint op- orator's trial Is scheduled to hogin Feb. 3 but {lie XERF LeaVes Man Dead Soldiers jQuell Armed Conflict C ClttDAD ACUNA — One man was found shot to death today in the wake of a wild gun battle at Radio Station XERF near here. Found dead today was a man identified as Gilberto Alvarado, about 50. His body was found by a cowboy on the Jesus Perales rancli, which adjoins the radio station property, some 10 miles from Acuna. The slain man, found about 500 yards from the station, had a gaping bullet wound in the back. Saturday's 4-H Livestock Show Has 335 Entries Final entry figures for the 23rd Val Verde County 4-H Club Livestock Show and Sale to be held at the Fair Grounds Friday and Saturday were announced today by Tommy E. Tatum, county agent. There are 288 fat lamb entries, 12 Angora billies. IS Angora nannies, 25 Rambouillet ewes, and 15 Rambouillet bucks. Friday's program will begin at 8 a.m. with the arrival of livestock. All livestock must be in place by noon. Weighing, sifting, and class* ification of fat lambs will start a! 8 Aoo^oothing and sifting of breeding stock will start at 2 p.m. Saturday's activities will get underway at 8 a.m. with the judging of fat lambs. Drawing for place in the auction sale w II be held immediately following the selection of the cham- pbn lambs. Persons attending the show w 11 have the opportunity to eat barbecue lamb from 12 noon to 1 p.m. at the 4-H Club building. Trouble erupted at the station about 4:30 p.m. Monday. Radio station employes claim an armed hand of nine men suddenly began an attack on the building. Station personnel said they returned the fire and unknown to the attackers outside, they broadcast urgent appeals for help over the station's power ful transmitter. Persons in Acuna, hearing the appeals, notified authorities. Second Lt. Juan Manuel Perez and six soldiers from the army garrison in Acuna, accompanied by Oscar Inigo, second in command of the Acuna police, rushed to the station to find the wild battle still in progress. The troops quelled the battle. One man was captured. The others fleU This morning, after the ranch hand had discovered the body. Victor Calderon, commander of the Acuna police. Lie. Jorge Cano Loperena, district attorney . and Lt. Perez, went to the scene to conduct an investigation. Another man surrendered himself voluntarily to authorities today. The two men held in cus- ^^^^.^ ^^,. ^ ^ ^^^^ ,^^^.. ^^^L ,^^^^ The BUDGET DOLLAR Corporation tafttmi Urn Health, labor and Witfari JOHNSON'S BUDGET — Charts show where the money in the budget presented by President Johnson today will come from and how it is to be spent. (NEA Telephoto) LBJ Asks Reverse In Spending Tide WASHlNCfTON (AP) - PreS-l At year> end. JfiSe 30, ident Johnson called a turn-'the national debt will have in about to the long upward march of federal spending to- I day with a cost-cutting, tax- cutting, $97.9-billion budget aimed at the nation's pockets of poverty. Johnson sent Congress a fiscal 1965 budget message which confidently assumed the "earliest possible" tax reduction. He The auction sale will start at' tody have been removed to an 2 p. m. 1 undisclosed location by officers. Wool Growers Asked To Help U.S. Save ALBUQUERQUE, N. M. (AP)| He said costs of supervising —The assistant secretary of the . grazing rules and regulations interior for public land manage-1 have "soared beyond expecta- ment asked livestock men today tions." to help cut the cost of adminis- ; "What t am suggesting is that tering public lands. 1 we should move toward regula- In an address to the National tio ° bas , ed «P° n trust termed it a "giant step toward. . .a balanced budget in a full-employment, full-prosperity economy." The budget would carve $1.3 billion and 27,000 civilians from the Defense Department. He proposed a $54-billion national defense effort, which includes along with actual military expenditures such costs as civil defense, stockpiling and atomic weapons procurement. Other cuts would hit the Agriculture Department, the Post Office, the Atomic Energy Commission, and the Veterans Administration. The new fiscal blueprint also would thin slightly the over-all jobholders, sell creased from $311.8 billion to $317 billion, he estimated. Nevertheless it is a "compassionate" budget, Johnson said, providing history's heaviest spending for "our nation's most important resource — its people." He asked more than $1 billion for a package attack on the roots of misery. Johnson told the legislators he was guided, in this first major economic task of his presidency, by the principle that "an austere budget need not be and should not be a standstill budget," and explained: "When vigorous pruning of old programs and procedures releases the funds to meet new challenges and opportunities, economy becomes the companion of progress. . . "A government that is strong, a government that is solvent, a government that is compassionate is the kind of government that endures." He pledged that, despite mili- and nuclear cutbacks in • •v»«w<»w» »*-• b«>*>. iu an ttuvii caa tu niv muiiuucii , . r «•»«•*» wi *vv*^*«i jvwiiuivid a, ovit The psychiatrist pictured! Wool Growers Association, John and confidence and away from I off a billion-dollar batch of gov- j Ruby as "pre-set to be a fighter, | Carver Jr.. said sheepmen i to attack, to fight He's a fight-' wou ld help their own interests! ing man, geared up for physi-, by helping to reduce govern j cal action." ment overhead. Police Nob Five In Burglary Wave A 21-year-old Del Rio man is , Mexican city and Chief Koog charged with burglary and , wrote .the chief of police in four Others are in custody fol- i Acuna asking the suspect be lowing a joint investigation by ; relinquished to investigating city police and the sheriff's department, aided by police in Ciudud Acuna, Mexico. Under $1,000 bond officers. The Mexican chief complied Chief Koog said. Officers recovered $30 in cash Cantu Jr. Cantu is a native of Del Rio and has resided hero for years. Friends said he returned from California about a month ago. He appeared before Justice of the Peace Sergio Gonzalez Monday and his bond was fixed, At noon today, he was still in Val Verde County Jail in lieu of bond. Chief of Police J. R. Koog said his department received a report Monday that the Casas del Rio shopping center had been broken into and City Patrolmen 1. R. Barrera ant! RZ. Andrade investigated. They called in Deputy Sheriff Samuel Perez and a suspect °n V l8i and a number of checks that had figured in the burglary. "Our joint investigation, with city officers working with Sheriff Herman Richter's deputies, is continuing," Koog said. "We have clarified burglaries at a number of service stations, at the Chuck Box and DEL RIOANS ATTEND Among thos« attending the National Wool Growers Association convention In Albuqutrque art Mr. and Mrs. H. K. Fawctttt and Mr. and Mrs. R. W. Hodge of D»l Rio. I ernment assets and cut the defi- budget safeguards the ther strengthening of the most the formula - ridden, pseudo- precicion which now seems to dominate our regulatory structure." Carver said. "1 believe it can be done. I pledge that from our side we wiU try." The convention ends Wednesday. Richard de Felice of the agri culture Department's Foreign i held in the First Baptist Church San Felipe High School Band Hall," the chief said. Investigations have implicated four others and more suspects are being investigated, the police chief said. "Three of the four are to be charged with burglary and the other will be charged with re- Agricultural Service, said Mon day United States Agriculture is threatened by the European common market. He said the imposition of a variable import levy by the common market on poultry cut U.S. poultry exports to Europe by half. Levies on other american agricultural products "could put one-third to one-half of our agricultural exports to the east in jeopardy," de Felice said. Wool Growers President Hugh Barber urged the sheep industry to oppose further U. S. tariff decreases on Imports of lamb,| DEL RIO AND VICINITY: in Denver City Wednesday at 10 a.m. Burial will be made in Mission Burial Park in San Antonio Thursday at 10 a.m. Eddy was employed at Evans Foodway in Del Rio from June, 1959, to 1961. when he moved to Denver City. His widow and two sons, Irving Roy and James, survive. DEL RIO WEATHER mutton and wool cloth. Clear to partly cloudy and He said requests to other ns mild this afternoon, tonight and lions for voluntary decreases in i Wednesday. Low tonight, 50 to exports to the United States ,52; high tomorrow, 78 to 80. ceiving stolen property," Koog I have brought only increases. ; Maximum temperature yester said. "This joint effort seems to be the solution to a number af was traced to Cludad Acuna. burglaries we feel are solved. Officers discovered that the and with the investigation con- negotiators will offer further ______ =s=ra=r -_ Barber urged pressure on Con- day, 74; minimum 37. Minimum gress to have competing im- temperature this morning, 53. ports removed from the list of Time of sunset, 6:12 p.m. Time commodities on which american of sunrise tomorrow, 7:37 a.m. was in custody in [limiinK, nutylm ovc-n moro." ilnrilf defense establish- world has ever oil in half-from $10 billion this ' P^. b JL?!™'?! n J* i° r ., l . he _ fu !, year to $4.9 billion in the federal year starting July 1. Former Resident Killed in Wreck Irving Eddy, former resident of Del Rio, was killed in a car wreck Monday at 5:30 p.m. at Crane. Texas. Eddy was a resident of Denver City, moving there when he left Del Rio in 1981. Funeral services will be formidable ment the known." Spurred by tax cuts, national output this year will soar by nearly $40 billion to a surprising record total of about $623 billion, the President predicted, generating higher revenues de« spite the lower tax rates. So federal income' will climb by $4.6 billion hi the coming fiscal year to $93 billion, while government spending . is squeezed down by $500 million to $97.9 billion for the second budget cut in nine years. But Johnson added a warning — an implied hint of business recession and a bigger deficit if taxes are not cut — to jog the congressional champions ot fiscal caution who have delayed action for more than a year on the $11-billion tax reduction bill. Johnson proposed to cut 800 employes from the foreign aid program, a move certain to please the many aid critics in Congress, and to trim another 1,400,.from the Agriculture, fat partment, whose budget would be sliced by $1.3 billion to a total of $5.1 billion. For new foreign aid funds Johnson asked $3,4 billion—the lowest request since the Marshall Plan got under way in 1948 and a whopping $1.5 billion below what President John F. Kennedy sought a year a$o. But much of the savings in money and manpower would be diverted into .welfare, 'labor, education, job retraining?-youth assistance, and other 'arms of the antlpovertyj offensive. The much-publicized Johnson ax-work on federal employment wound up as a net cut of only 1,200 jobs, or a shaving of less S.e JOHNSON P«gt U Driver Education Registration Set Pre-registratlon for the annual Driver Education course at Del Rio High School will be held at 4 p.m. Thursday in the high school auditorium, R. C. King, principal, announced today. Traffic safety and driver training has been offered for several years in the Del Rio Independent School District and it has cultivated above average traffic safety among the teenagers that have taken Uie course. Among those completing the program last year, only five out of 152 have been involved in accidents. This is u 3 per cent record which is eon siderubly below the national average of 12 per cent. These figures arc based on the fact that on the average one out of four people throughout the nation are involved in an accident annually. Driver-trained arc involved in on average of one out of eight. Locally the ratio is one out of 30. Insurance companies see the instruction so beneficial toward better safety that they grant a 10 per cent discount for male drivers under 25 from their surcharge on auto Insurance premiums. As was the cast last y«*f. the course will be offered on a tuition basis for partial Coverage of offering driver education with the difference being made up by the school district. Instructors C. M. Br«djey and W. R. Carman attended i conference at Trinity Ul sity last week and Wer^ informed of new change* and proposed changes in the gram since last year. educators attended the confer* ence in San Antonio and <JU*> cussed mutual problems in tin fiold «f traffic snfetjr,

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