The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on February 5, 1931 · Page 6
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 6

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Blytheville, Arkansas
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Thursday, February 5, 1931
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Page 6
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'six (AUK.l COimiKK NKWS. .THUKSDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 19:!I "Rickard" of Grunt. Racket "Big Scoop" Caused Cur-j ley to Turn lo More l.«-| cralive Occupation. j BY WILLIAM HKAl'CIIKG I NEA Swvlce Sports KiMor ! NEW YORK. i UP) — In"ills <?'..:• | SO's in San Francisco n copy b;y named Jack Curlr-y was promr.'r.; i lo a Job as police reporter en .i:>-• } Chronicle. i He was a "romancei" llifii. '1.1 •• j charm Hint was San rram:iv:r'-- i:i | those days caught and held II.AI. j In the harbor were sqtisr."-ri.!::•'I ships. Horse cars labsre.l. u;> :.\ '; I'.llls. The streets seelliaJ «itli r.''.- • or. Adventures wove everywlnTi 1 . | There were gas-lighted t-c.v.?r.- ;•. i (small fight clubs. Men lived In :. daring way. But it was because Cm!'?y V.M- "> romancer that he was fired as n police reporter and a feu- d^y.s s.i- j ter he had been given the J^h A ' former Chronicle reporter moi i:;::;' one night on the suoew, to'.d i ~.!'.i a fantastic dream and Cnrley ni-:i- ed lo print with it. It sounded (.«:'. but was without foundation. } The other night a nc-jr record for crowds at Madison Square G-trJ-.-ri was set when 22.000 people JumintJ ' the building for a wresjllug match j The 'match was promoted by Jack j Curley. He Is a romancer still. •Jack Curtey, referred to often av the owner of "the pachyderm farm" on Long Island, manager ol a string ol wrestlers tint sliov: their wares from coast to coast, he has come up through adventuring that would fill a book. A bock? At his home he has more linn GO scrapbooks filled with newspaper clippings that form n history cf !!•:• growth of certain sports In America. He hns been everywhere, apparently, and seen even-thing. Jack's parents were Alntians. Five years before he was born liiev fled Alsace lo escape reprisals fallowing the Franco-Prussbn \v,i~. He was born at San Francisco J;;lv 4, 1876. He has knkown hunger, tramped . the streets, slept in alleys—and I iiven Caruso $10.000 a night to sim ' in six .cities. At- 13 he was a pupil at a school in the Voiges. his parents having returned to Europe, disappointed with the America of that period. And at 18 he obtained an exclusive Interview with Eugene V. D:bs concerning the strike that followed the boom of t>.e World's Fair in Chicago. He washed dishes, wrote on space, st-oonded fighters. In" 1903 he was riding about Chicago's streets In a Pope-Toledo, j with the entrance In the rear, anci with an ex-hghter as a chauffeur. He . traveled In seven counlrle.- seeklrig a place where Ihey would let him hold the Johnson-Willard fight, and. naa to croy the cce.in three, times to sign up the fighters. Romancing? Curley has don: r- little of it! ' For years he has good-natured- ly been the brunt of newspaper .Jokes poked at the wrestling fraternity. He has promoted all sorts of things, from flea circuses to concerts by the Valican choir, but Cur- • Rl1 '-'- /~u T* TV, TV/v/"i • \( IS/\UJUI II IK UvjM,r*5/^Vj* "wi« BRUSHING UP SPORTS By hai-fcr VCE. I noticed recently where a wrestler slapped Jack Dirnpscy and llul Jack promptly JluUi'nid tlie wrcsiit-r. Hut with commission? nnd Ihe like, this thing of Inking a iwke M the referee isn't so prevalent as it v.as In the old days. I was behind Mysterious Billy Smith r.n (wo occasions v.fitre he socked an arbiter. Once I didn't blame him; the other lime I couUln'l see ?ils viewpoint. More than 30 yews ago I pu! Smith :t];.i!mt Australian Jim llyan In a flyhl al Astoria, Orojon. In those clav.s Astoria was a mecca fur JACK CUKI-KY Srhmeling Rack .More C*;irs! More Ciars! How about wars for all sports? Chess and checkers might be «:- ccptcd, and there Is R possibility that horseshoes could get along without a Brand and exalted ruler. ! fchenncn. sallormen and lough lumberjacks, n yrcat s|X>t lining and ready to eo the limit lor anybody they likrd. . , They liked Ryan and bet heavily on him. 1 cautioned Smith lit* rough tactics mlyht lose us the light or even our lives, j Smitli tore In like a demon, but whenever he'd get. too rough, the | Australian would drop and take n nine count. We begged the referee I to make Hyan slay on his feet if lie wasn't hll. but he paid no attention lo us. Finally Ihe enraged Smith cracked Kyun on the jaw while Ryan was on his knees. The referee at once «ave Hyan the fight. And Smllh kncckcd the referee cold. I felt elated—until, as we turned to leave the ring, we saw (hose tough Astorians closing in from all sides. Some smart man—how I'd like to thank him—cut the llyht wires. The yelling-mob became confused. Jack. Fahle, a Portland sportsman, sneaked us out of the buildup. We caught a Portland-bound boat before the refeice's friends learned we had fled. + * • Later, I 'Iiad Smitli against Tommy Ryan at Maspeth, Long Island. They fought evenly for a while, then Ryan staggered Smith with a right uppcrcut. Mysterious retaliated by lowering his head and bulling Ryan in the month, cutlins his llus and Injuiini: Ryan's nose. Referee Tim Hurst stopped the fight, and awarded the decision to Ryan. Again Smith swung on the referee, the punch just grazing Hurst's cheek. I "Billy, lliat didn't do you any gonil; you lose anyhow," said Hurst, but recent violent disturbances In I wlio could keep his lemper and-finite in such a case, the beak-busting and blocking and | lackllng induslrlcs seem lo call for < the election ol a klngflsh. • The Florida llslic situation and the recent chorus of piercing . shrieks emitted by the college | presidents bring Ibis to ininci. | Rivalry between Madison Square | Garden and Frank J. Bruen In the matter of providing some sort of pugilistic parly for the tourists In Florida recently became so spirited that- even Al Capone became disgusted with the situation urn! h said to have advised elimination of ', the proposed Rlsko-Waikcr bout at ! Mlnml, which would conflict with • Driien's Maloney-Carncra show at Miami I3each. Capone's alleged voluntary in-1 tc-rcst in boxing affairs Is in Itself I a suggestion. Why not elect Ca• pone high commissioner of the mitt ; game, awarding him some sucr. 1 tl- ! tic as Big Bozo of Boxing? . Kidding? Oh Xo! This proposal really Is advanced here in a serious way (I thought I heard a noise behind me just then , and we are not intending to poke fun at Mr. Capone here lo- any place else).' A sport that Is so infested with racketeers needs a firm hand such as Capone's. A word ! from the Capone headquarters would mean more to the muscle DID YOU KNOW THAT— ~... • , . ™ a I'tavlEr than w!ic:i lieifmd chisel men lhan all the state ley, eminently, stands for wrestll:^.', m? ; cl!> '," s l - lsl - ™" nppnnnv. Mix j cox j nB commission edlcls that you rears when wrest-I ° cll! " c - ln S ° f Rcnnany is pictured could * " And during the ye ....^ ^ J ._ ling was in disrepute, his wrestlers i al50vs ' p s lie arrived in NL'-.V York still went over wilh a bang in thel lc tcs!l1 ' r;i;ilI »S for bouts with smaller towns, Voiinj Stribling anci Prime Cav- • • • j n:ra. He \vill start on a tour At 55 Curley Is in almost as good ihrou<h tile south, southwest an;l condition PS any of his grapplcrs ' middle west on February 9. He never has taken a drink or- smoked a cigaret! Bob Jor.nson. fly-chaser from Portland, purchased by Connie Mack, is half Indian ... His brother. Hoy. (he Detroit oul- flelder, is halt Indian, too . . . So that makes one entire Indian in the majors . ... You'd think there really were more Indians than that In the big leagues if you could see some of the boys playing bean-bac down on the corner same o'T these evenings . . . Oh, yes. Chief Bender, cone hot the Giant pitchers, is an Indian, too. ... He got his name throwing a. Bender, not going on one. . . . Chief Myers, the old Giant catcher, was Injun, also. . . . and if they had been usiivr the lively ball In Ihe majors In his day Myers would be slajins; pale-faced third bas> men by the score . . . He had a way of knocking a close, fisl one Ihroujh the thlrd-sackcr's ribs. Bakhvyn Loses to Cards; Star Team Swamps Blytheville JOINER. Ark.—The Earle Cardinals defeated the Baldwyn,- Miss., learn, one of tho strongest cage teams in the tri-states, 31 v> 21 here lasl night. Dushey, lied Sox pitcher, playing with the Card basketeers. was h!i(h point scorer, with eight palnls. •• Hughes, center, was second with . -=?vf n poinls and Bard was strong 'on defense. ; The Blythevillo Independents ' v.ere ;s»Tmn;r! by Ihe Shawn f- Wilsou team, 44 to 18 In a prellml- i nnry contest. Burnett led-for the ! combination, and Hudson was the 1 Blytheville ace. Earle high defeated Shawnec in 11 tweliminary gixme, 14 to 12. City League to Start' At 7 (VCjock Tonight The regular weekly gan.es of th" i City Cage Leagtie are scr.edul"^ i for tonight 'at the Armorv. Trp two teams meeting In the first cf! the four games to > play:d t.i-1 night are requestwl by Charles T Kramer to b? ready for action a- 7 oclock. The Gas Hounds with lhr'» lories are leading the leap at"' ent. Xavy Post His vie- Well, the Nature Faker ! Springs Good On? 1 PROSPECT, Conn., iUPi _ A narrow escape on the part cf Lester Green, Prospect nature faker snd Inventor, In his "eel car" is reported by Lou Mortisscn. | m -. aginative country correspondent Ea-.-ir E iK">> for tha'Waterbury RepaKlcap.. •p'o.idin' -r"l"" Lester and his wife were driving c>vp-i " D t -i- c " • to a Grange meeting In their auto rr.fi " .lid think of. A Football Cillph ! Durini; the recent hubbub rc- ; gardlng overemphasis of football i every plan was suggested that p I college president could think of— ;. and college presldenls can think of [ a lot of plans. It was even su^sest- cxl that the big game between dear | old Oglcwash and Sldebuni be a j private affair held In somebody's . cellar. It was propped that the • nlnmni supiiort the came, anj a ; few miles away you could hear otli- ; er college athletic bo.ircir s:re.i:n- ;ing for relief from the cntallc crll- j Icism of the ver>' sam« old gr.ids. | Professor Ralph \V.. Algler, | chairman o! the board of athletics ; nt Michigan, comes to the plate waving a plan to unify Hie gen- ter the rules. If you have of universal rules for the game, you need some big shot to administer .them and Issue edicts, etc, who ought to get this Job? Wdl. how abo-.it Dugs Moran? But oh. we fcrgot—Bugs Is mysteriously missing. And beside smaybe Mr. Capone might not like the ap- poinlment. Name your own czar. Pnrsley is said to have come from Egypt, and mythology tells us that it was used to adorn tho I head of Hercules. RITZ THEATER Friday and Saturday eral principles of athletic proprle- Buffalo Fish V/ithout Mouth Is Caught NATCHTTOCHES, Ln., (UP) — Champ!ons!iip fishing has another candidate In Earl Morris. Fish and Game Warden of Natchitoches _T Parish, who offers as his qualifications a two pound buffalo fish: without a mouth But ho didn't land the freak I with a hook and line. It came in'-1 to'hls net when he was seining In' the back waters of Red River, he I . CWSR 8V WSPiUCWIifeTHES6*M HAD A Major L'Enfant was well known to President Washingfn. and was fant, a major of the French army.- commissioned to lay out the city. HOME THEME Friday and Saturday TIFFANY presents /BOB , ty, making schools which rto not explained, and he returned it to 1 subscribe to the code outlaws. ; its haunts, where it probably Is | This comes right down to the ' living now, getting Its food through < point of naming a C?.OT to adminis- , its gills. I Miller, above, a 1 t'le X-i'e Dime >»d "l" - "0™- v'll become b^d fo-'bili r,.lhe U. S CN a«l\ca^m ^ cc.ich at tile Navy for the pa;t five years. OiTiolal an- nouncra-.cnt from the N-VJ! Acsd- cxocct- Lester was amazed until his wif.v vhltpered in his ear. He opened r ,_ , ,. the eel tank and found the 12 had : " ,°' ! us apiwln'.ment is become 91.. H; removed the ',9 \n-,^_^'^>- fant eels and continued his drive. " at least so "reported Mortisson. Stc.lcn Rinse \Vis li.iy's Toy - ' SAXON, WIs. (Upi—A 5351 '-l- CEIiTERVlLLE, la. (UP)— Tli5 niwiu ring, missin? slr.cr Ills th-It blby carriage busincfs Is only 15 'ol a mail sack containing two rin"-!3 ccr cent of what it was before ths 'and ST1.000 In cr.r-h >.>•;.• Ynr's Fve advent of the autcmobll*, acc«r3- wan found to bp t^.c p'i\t 1 i;ii<- ol In? lo I/Duls Rltchell, ftimlturo : an eisht-ypai-oM b-v "h----'\" ,\ dealer. "When I rrentlon a baby ; nephew of cno of t'::c V.T.;:IK c--arg- hussjr to people w-lth a new baby," jcd with t>-.e robbery csvr it ti r./i-.. Ritchie -relates,- "they laugh ana Robet La Bla 'c taid wiien his fa- say they don't need it with a car." ther investigated. Our Want-Ad Service is like community Switch Hoard. You transmit your desires io a News Ad-Taker . . . that nd forms the connection between you and n. special group of interested parties ... the quickest and most direct contact \vi(h results. For an Ad-Take in the Belasco , lauqh hit! A THE BACHED PATH 'NEAR RAINBOWS END" With Loutst LOTTOS** Thrills! Thrills! Thrills! Dirttled b)r J. P. McGotru RCA Pholophont | Admission—Matinee & Night 10 and 25c. i Marvelous Values! iv -' ,r ' Spring Dresses Smart and Nciv Admission—Matinee— 10-30c Night—10 and 35c. Last Time Today 'All Quiet on the Western Front' Matinee —2 O'clock & U:30. 10 and 30c. N'iglit—G:-15 nnd 8:-15— 15 and 40c. Last Time Today Tast Is West' With Lupe Velez. Lewis Ayres i Edward G. Robinson Admission—Matinee & Night| 10 and 25c. i " " ~ ! Cominp—Sunday & Monday' Coming—StiiidRy & Jlonday —"LOTTERY BRIDE" with —That "It" Girl—Claw Bow Joan'tte HacDonald and Joe in "NO LIMIT". I These dresses would have sold for two or three dollars more than this price a year ago! Each one is 3 new Spring style ... of bright colored silk crepe, i gay new print or a combination of a print and a plain color ... just the kind of a dress you want to wear right now ... and all through the Spring. J. C. PENNEY CCUnc, 220-222 W. M:iin SI reel Rlythcville, Ark.

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