The Philadelphia Inquirer from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on September 1, 1896 · Page 6
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The Philadelphia Inquirer from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania · Page 6

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THE PHTLiADELiPHIA. INQUIHER TUuESD AT MOITNING, SEPTEMBER 1, 1896. 6 The Philadelphia Inquirer ' . PUUIHI VMV DV4lf THI Vt rV-' THEINQUIRERCOMPANY JAMES ELVERSON PRESIDENT THE INQUIRER BUILDING. 1109 MARKET STREET WASHINGTON BUREAU, 110112 C ST. NEW YORK BUREAU, PULITZER BUILDING THE iNVUIftC I FOR SALE AT THI LCADINa HOTtLt AMD STANDS IN Kt VOAK SV T O'CLOCK CVCftV MORNINa. The Dailv Inouirck is piuvmri by carrier at SIX CCNTS A WCCKi PAYABLE TO THI CARRIER OR AGENT, v MAIL TyVENTV-riVC CENTS A MONTH. OR THRrE OOLLANS - FER ANNUM, IN ABVARCE. Sunday Coition. 2.eo per year. OAily and Sunday. SB.80 per year The Sunday inouirer will be sold by carriers. NEWS AGENTS AND NEWSBOYS AT 'IVE CENTS Con THROUGHOUT THE CITY AND COU NTRY--I NCLUOING THE - BEAUTIEUL COLORED ART SUPPLEMENT. Make all money Orders, Checks OR drafts payable to The Philadelphia InouirEr Company. Manuscripts will not be returned unless postage is sent for that purpose, rutin no case will till inquirer be THE DATE WHEN THE SUBSCRIPTION EXPIRES IS ON THE ADDRESS LABEL OF EACH PAPER. THE CHANGE OF WHICH TO A SUBSEQUENT DATE BECOMES A RECEIPT FOR REMITTANCE. NO OTHER RECEIPT IS SENT UNLESS REQUESTED. THE PAPER IS STOPPED AT THE EXPIRATION OF THE SUBSCRIPTION IF RENEWAL 8 NOT RECEIVED. . The Philadelphia Inquirer TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 1,1896 TIAEUUE PAGES THE INQUIRER 13ft MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS (fa &(( &((fc Will Be Delivered By carrier , to any address in Atlantic City or Cape Aay, N. J., at 6 cents - per week for the daily edition and 11 cents per week for both daily and' Sunday. Orders by mail will receive immediate attention. tfte Inquirer Is for sale at face price on the Boardwalk in Atlantic City, at the Book Store in Kipple & McCann's, Ocean Avenue and the Boardwalk, and at Brown's Book Store, Luray Parlors, Kentucky Ave. and the Boardwalk. Address all communication to The Philadelphia Inquirer Co., and not personally to members .of the staff. ; ' When tbere is no choice we do well to make no difficulty." George SlacDonald. Advertise in The Inquirer without a murmur. 118,533 is the number of copies of Inquirer sold yesterday. ' p ' 9 founded by the famous prince bishop, Danillo Petrovic, who iu 1097 freed his country from the domination of Turkey- and formed an alliance with Russia 'which 'has never been broken. By this act it secured a place in European politics far bejond that to which it would have, been" entitled by population or extent of territory. It has been said of the Montenegrins that they are too many for an embassy and too few for an army, but their bravery and good faith have, always beep acknowledged in Europe and they have shown indomitable patriotism in their constant struggle to retain their independence. t The political significance of the approaching marriage becomes interesting when the present condition of Italy is considered. She, or rather her statesmen, have been carried away by dreams of the wielding of a power which her natural resources could never sustain. Instead of putting her internal affairs on a firm basis she has built a huge navy, sought to set up an African dominion and to-day stands humiliated, with a debt which is crushing her, her industries ruined and the flower of her population and the stay of the country dragged into the army and navy. It is true that she is a member of the Triple Alliance, but that does not help her treasury in any way, and that is the only form of aid which would benefit her. Even as it is, she has not now the same feeling of .friendship for Germany which she once showed, and it would not surprise if she should yet transfer her allegiance to Russia. The fact that the proposed marriage was suggested by the Czar lends color to this thought and it may be that she will readjust her political relations in the hope of further expansion. An alliance with Montenegro would certainly be looked ( upon as foreshadowing an alliance with Russia. A Newspaper Estimate of the Election. The New York Herald has made a canvass of New York, New Jersey and Connecticut with a view to ascertaining as nearly as may be the result in the November election. Postal cards were sent out to voters in selected voting precincts, in cities, villages and in the country asking the voters to announce their preference for President, with the name of the candidate voted for in 18T2. While only 4300 cards were sent out and all have not replied, the responses show a remarkable drift to McKinley. This is the result of the poll in nine districts of New York city: Election District. o o -s n P o to 5" 3 10 1$ S3 - re vj S CO o to o o re n PS. g g.3 a o o 3 3 O K o co o 10 00 to New Voters. inth Assem. Dist., 1st. 10 15)th Assem. Dist., 2d. 11 19th Assem. Dist., 17th 8 21 st Assem. Dist.. 1st. 34 21st Assem. Dist., 4th. 24 21st Assem. Dist., 24th 2 22d Assem. Dist.-, 1st. 4 22d Assem. Dist., 2d.. 20 22d Assem. Dist., 10th. 3 S 2 t r 3 1 4 9 3 37 3.1 4 22 18 0 1 1 1 6 7 3 1 9 7 1 1 "I The Constantinople Riots, It may be, as has been asserted in various quarters, that the recent disturbances in-Con-J etantinople and Galatea were fomented by the Armenian revolutionary committee, but that dees not lessen the responsibility'of the Porte and of the Europoean powers for the outbreak. The persecuted Armenian subjects of the Sultan have been the victims' of atrocity after atrocity, and they iuici ue more than human if the spirit of reye e did not sway them. But t must be remembered that it was not fhe starving villagers from Asia Minor who came to the Turkish capital and exploded Wmbs and dynamite. If those acts were the "work of Ar menians they were Armenians who livdd in the city and sought, doubtless, by this means to keep up the feeling against Turkey Jor her barbarism and cruelty. But while their course may not have been a wise one, you cannot indict a whole people for the acts of a few Individuals, and .the suffering thousands in Arme nia should still have the sympathy of the world. The methods adopted by. those rioters, whoever they may have been, to terrorize the Turk were akin to those which are in use by England and Germany when they wish to annex territory in' Africa, but the Turk cantfot see it in -that light, and so retaliated in his usual brutish fashion. The rioters were not suppressed by the military, but they and hundreds of; unarmed Armenians were turned over to savage fanatics who slew them in their homes, hurried them through the streets and drowned them In the harbor. It has been broadly hinted by correspondents of German newspapers, who lej'laiiilj" have no motive to misrepresent the situation, that the outbreak was one of those fictitious revolts which have before now been started in Constantinople, and this is probably nearer the truth. The unspeakable Turk .is fer tile in expedients, and for ways that are dark and tricks that are vjv!u is a past grand master, beside the heathen Chinee. The foreign diplomats' stationed in Constantinople have now Sent a note to the Sultan warning him that there must tie no more massacres, and as if to emphasize tins warning a detach-ineiit ot . British marines who were pjarching from the British guardshjp to the British Em-; bassy on Sunday last clubbed and beat back a Turkish mob who were maltreating a number of Armenians in the street. The Porte protested, and was informed by the British Charge 4'Afiaires that the marines had a perfect right to protect the Armenians If the Turkish troops lid not see fit to do so. If any country in Europe has the power to stay the hand of Turkish cruelty and tyranny it is Great Britain, and if that country should now intervene we would hear the last of outrage and rnassaere. The New Alliance. For some time rumor has been busy with the riame of the Prince of Naples, heir to the '"thfono df Italy. It is five years since he attained his' majority and during all that time nothing was said as to his marrying. His 'health was reported to be poor and there was a Tear expressed that some one not In the direct line of succession might succeed to the throne .sw thus bring about complications of a trou rb'iesbme character. It is now authoritatively announced that he is betrothed to the Princess Helena, daughter of Nicholas, Prince of Montenegro, whom the late Czar used to call Rus sia's only true friend in Europe. - There is a vast difference, both in size and strength, between Italy and "the kingdom of Mpatenesro, .but tie, Montenegrin dynasty was Totals, 9 precincts.. .110 50 110 22 18. - 4 .Based on this result the city of New York will give a majority of 4G.C00 for McKinley. The above- poll represents over one-fourth of the voters in the districts. In the country districts the result was much the same and the Herald computes that McKinley's majority in New YorkNtate will be 264,000. In New Jersey the changes are more remarkable. The poll was taken in Newark, Jersey City and Hoboken. Based on the replies received the Herald computes that New Jersey will give McKinley 75.000 majority. On the same basis it figures 40,000 for McKinley in Connecticut.. While the basis Is entirely too small to maa confident predictions, the results attained by the Herald are in line with the reports that come in from' all sources. It is significant that wherever" a straw vote is taken the result is always in the same direction. While In the nii ral districts the changes may be less Important than in the cities there is no reason to doubt that the Herald's figures represent the situation very fairly, , It Is conceded, however, that the battle ground is In the Mississippi Valley. Bryan must carry the Solid South, including Delaware, Maryland and ;West Virginia, and every State ivest of the Mississippi. This would give him 226 electoral votes. But does any one really suppose that Bryan will carry Delaware (now that the factional fight is ended), Maryland, West Virginia, Kentucky or Iowa? These States represent forty-three " votes. Does anyone really believe Bryan will carry Washington or Nebraska? The- reports indicate that Oregon, California, Wyoming and Minnesota are much more likely to go Republican than not. Where does Bryan expect to get the votes to offset these? Illinois is not half enough and Indiana and Michigan will not supply the de ficiency; but who expects Illinois or Michigan to go Popocratic? It is difficult to see how Chairman Jones can figure out victory at this stage of the contest. The Reports on the State GtiardV The reports made by Colonel Sumner, of the Sixth Cavalry, Captain Leyden, of the Fourth Infantry, and Major Hoff, the regular army officers detailed to attend the division camp at Lewistown in Julyj will be read with interest by the public and members of the guard. These reports are appreciative ana in tne.mam eulogistic, although the guard comes in for a share of criticism. Captain Leyden says that the non-commissioned officers were not familiar with their duties as squad and section leaders in extended movements and that consequently there was a lack of snap in the movements of the men. He adds that the simple commands wtre rarely given correctly and that the drill In extended order was defective. Colonel Sumner compliments the guard for the spirit which causes so large a proportion to turn out. At Lewistown 98 per -eent. were present, but he doubts if 90 per cent, could be safely counted upon. We submit that the judgment of the officers, based on experience and knowledge of the men, Js more valuable on this point than that of the regular- officer. Colonel Sumner speaks highly of the efficiency of the general, the division and brigade staffs, of the assembling and dispersion of the troops, the care of the men, the clear military style of the orders and the thoroughness of the inspection. He notes particularly the parading of the division and of the change of front exe cuted under General Snowden's orders. He recommends the formation of another troop of cavalrj which would glye a squadron wun per manent commander, and he concludes by saying that the National Guard of Pennsylvania Is prepared in all essentials for any call made upon it. . This is high praise and it is fully merited. The friends and admirers of the State Guard have had only one doubt in regard to its future, a doubt springing from the fear that it might be content to rest satisfied with Its pres-est state of development. Except In details, In the handling of the squad or , the troop, the regular army is not able to teach it much. If the guard is to advance beyond the position which it has already attained the moving Spirit must come from within the guard itself. There is no other force of men in the country from which its higher officers can draw-inspiration, much as some of the company officers might profit by the example set by the regular army. In a series of years the reports and comments of the regular army have been useful chiefly for wrhat they had to say on points of military drill, where the regular army is strong. Upon those points where the regular army is weak, that organization cannot give much instruction to the guard. In the handling of men In large masses, in the transpoi'tation of troops in considerable numbers and in certain disagreeable lines of practical work the guard has had more experience than the regular army of to-day. The guard, however, should not and does not underestimate the value of the suggestions made from time to time by the regular officers. Some of the guards' older officers well remember that the division of the Fifth'Corps of the Army of the Potomac, which was formed of regular troops, could be distinguished from the other divisions f the army long after the origi nal officers and most of the men had been changed, so efficient had been the work of the early drill masters and so long lived the military spirit lleveloped by their handling of the troops. , Make Your Choice, Republicans. On Tuesday, September 15, between the hours of 6 and 8!P. M., the Republican voters of Philadelphia will decide whether they pre fer following a pack of political bosses and lobbyists or signing a new declaration of independence. . Philadelphia has been robbed for many years. Everybody knows it. - We have been paying for leaky reservoirs, cheaply paved streets, poor gas, electric light trusts, a host of petty office holders not needed by the people but by political bosses, and we have been making fortunes for men who have kindly relieved the citizens of all responsibility in municipal affairs. This has been a very costly enterprise. We have sunk millions. We have profited nothing. Now we have arrived at the crossroads. We are to determine at the primaries whether we shall continue the pernicious, obnoxious, detestible boss-ship of the city by irresponsible politicians and lobbyists and continue to pay tribute to them, or whether we, as citizens of the. most patriotic and enlightened city of America, shall take the control of affairs into our own hands. We are to decide whether we shall give away franchises to such concerns as the Mutual Automatic Telephone Company and secure votes for; them by bribery or whether we shall send the lobbyists into retirement and give the taxpayer a chance to exist without being made the victim of political robbers and plunderers. , We are to decide between the control of the people and the control of the lobby, arrogant with power and stuffed with its proceeds. This is the whole issue in the present local campaign. Elect a Combine candidate for Sheriff and the same old methods will go on. Elect Mr. Crow and there will be such a rattling of dry bones as will satisfy the community that hereafter there is to be a change and that the people, not the lobbyist politicians, are to be considered. New Jersey, Cape Cod and a small territory in the Northwest, and if the consumption of cranberries had kept pace with the growth of population cranberry growing would be one of the most profitable of enterprises. But with low prices, frosts and hoppers, the cranberry grower, lilje, a good many other persons, is full of troubles; As this is the 1st of September, the straw hat will doubtless be. discarded in many quarters to-day. The wise man, however, is learning not to be a chronologist and does not regulate his habits by the times and seasons, but by his ideas of comfort. People are beginning to find out that the stickler for conventionality does not enjoy himself half as much as the man who snaps his fingers at almanacs and "sich." Now that the "jeunesse doree" or New York have seen Li Hung Chang in all his glory, they will doubtless cast off their English-made clothes and dress themselves in yellow jackets and peacock feathers. And as for the women, there will be no more broughams with armorial bearings. They will be carried around in sedan chairs, just as the sex was in the days of Queen Anne, . We are glad that the Brooklyn has got back in time for Li Hung Chang to see her at the yard where she was bull. Li, no doubt, would be as willing to spend money for a navy in the United States as in Europe. Hetty Green offers to give $100,000 as an endowment fund for a home for agedand infirm actresses; Why, bless her innocent heart, "when they are aged they can always secure positions as coryphees or chorus girls. There are signs in the Combine organs that they, do not really believe that Quay has deserted his friends. They assert that he has so loudly that the noise is a kind of measure of their lack of faith. Mons. Henri . Watterson says that it is impossible to get drunk on Swiss wine. Will MonT sieur inform an anxiously waiting public just how much he drank before he found this out? SILVER QUESTIONS RHSWERED All Respectful Queries Will Given Attention Here. Be AH respectful questions concerning the gold and silyer issue will be answered in these columns from day to day. State your questions plainly and in the briefest possible space. Letters are restricted to 300 words. by the adoption of free and unlimited coinage of silver, 2. If any person take a counterfeit coin the loss is his. It would be the duty of the government to run down counterfeiters and punish them under the free and unlimited coinage of silver on private account, the same as 5t is now in regard to any of the coins of the United States coined an government account, as is the case with silver, .or on private account, as is the case with gold. The government assumes the sole power of coining mon ey as an act of sovereignty. It usea its power to give itself a monopoly of the coining business. No one else IN SOCIETY'S REALMS. Miss Helen Bickley, niece of Mra. Thomas A. Scott, met with a jpainf ul accident while riding on her bicycle at Bar Harbor on Wedtesday last. While riding down Eden iil a couple of teams came racing up To avert a collision she threw herself from the wheel and in the fall received a severe bruise over the right ey. After a stay in-doors of a few days, she s now able to be out again. v The "Freddie" Gebhards are setting the Dace for novel entertaining at Bar is permitted to mint either gold or sil- N Harbor. The latest was a large barn , ver into coins or even into bars, and dance and clam bake. A score of Phil- Li Hung Chang wanted to know where we got so many generals. But wait until he has been introduced to our colonels, then he will have some questions to ask. It is gravely announced from London that the new Sultan of Zanzibar is for peace. 'Well. a. man surrounded by Maxim and Gatling guns is liKeiy to be for anything and everything. The back of the summer is, perhaps, merely wilted from the excessive heat. It doesn't seem to have stiffness enough to have ever been broken. While Bryan is in the neighborhood he might try to persuade Niagara Falls to run up hill. ' Th$ oyster's series of "At Homes" begins today. - . ; V State News and Comment. The Vermont Election. An election will take place to-day in Vermont for State officers, and th?s result will be watched with unusual interest. While Rhode Island, Oregon and Alabama have early elections they are not usually considered important! But Vermont, the fourteenth State of the Union, has given a keynote in recent years, as to the result of the election. The population is not large, but Is diversified, about one-half rural and the other half engaged In manufacturing and other pursuits, so that it represents a fair average of the country. If Vermont gives an unusually, large Republican majority it may be taken as n decided omen of Republican success. The Republican majorities in recent years have been as follows: - 1884, 22,183. 1S8G, 28,095. 18S8. 28,404. 1890, 14,1&3. 1892, 21,667, 1894, 28,521. ' In 1894 the total vote was 58,015. Although one of the smallest States its Leg islature is the largest with the exception of New Hampshire. Every town (or township as we would say) has its member and this tends to bring opt a full vote. The full returns from Vermont will be awaited with unusual interest. The Democrats of Crawford county have put a fusion ticket in the .field for Assembly. It consists of P. M. Cutshall, Democrat, and C. A. Stranahan and J. B. Phelps, Populists. Schaefferstown, Lebanon county, has the oldest public water works in the United States. The water was brought down the mountain in pipes and supplied to the houses, and at regular distances watering troughs and fountains were placed in the street. Julius Sachse, who has beem making a tour of the valley, says a triphammer forge and a boring mill where Revolutionary and frontier rifles were made may still be seen in the -valley. . The . indorsement by the Delaware county Democrats of W. H. Berry, the Nationalist candidate 1 for Congress, is not approved by the Chester county Democrats. -"v Sniediey' Darlington Is going on the stump in Western Pennsylvania. J. C. Sturtevant has declined to debate the silver question with Joseph C. Sibley at the Corry Fair, i , Thursday, September 3, will be the last day for the registration of citizens who desire the legal right to vote at the November election of this year. This applies to residence in the State of one year and sixty days in a ward or township. The lists are to be seen at all voting places within the State, where citizens can refer to them to ascertain whether or not they are registered. In the coal regions, in spite of " the denials made, it is believed that Pierpont Morgan will control the Coxe coal properties. Apparently the time is not far distant when Morgan will control the anthracite coal as Rockefeller controls oil. The astonishing part of the business is that Pennsylvanians should not have leen able to hold on to, these stores of weaitn. Frank I. Gosser. nominated by the Democrats for State Senator in the Forty-fifth District, has written a final letter refusing the nomination. Tho Wavnesbure Independent of August 27 is a centennial edition in commemoration of the centennial anniversary or ureene county. it consists of sixteen Illustrated pages, with a decorative cover. The historical address of Hon. J. W. Ray is printed in full. But perhaps the mo6t interesting article in the number is tne account of the collection of a young Greece county naturalist, J. Warren Jacobs. He was born in lJSofS. and is consequently not yei win iy years old. His collection of North American birds' eggs number 450O. representing every Stat e, besides Canada, Mexico, the West Indie. Iceland and Greenland. He also has many nests and many stuffed birds and paintings of birds the pictures being his own work. The egg collection was selected by the State Comr mission to represent the State avifauna at tht World's Fair. - UP TO DATE PERSONALS The Illinois Legislature passed a law at its last session providing for the indeterminate sen tence of criminals and the release on parole of thnse who have been well-behaved after they had served' the minimum period. The law provides that a convict shall not be released until work has been found for him in some place where he will not come into association with other criminals, and those who favor the law have been busy in a search for employers of labor who will give such men work and so enable them to earn an honest living. When an employer does agree to engage a discharged prisoner he must have a written contract for the latter's services with the prison authorities, he j must send a monthly report of the man a Dena vior ito the warden of the prison from which he was released, and he must also have his own responsibility certified to by an officer of the court or some person in good standing. When a man violates his parole he. will be returned to prison and will then serve the maximum term provided by law for the crime which he comr mitted- At the end of six months, which is the term of probation, the man may be discharged for good. The first releases have Just been mad under the law! and the results will, no doubt, be looked for with interest, not only by the people of Illinois, but by all who have studied the question of penal reform. As the matter bf association has always been held to be largely responsible for the relapse of discharged criminals into their evil habits and the new law seeks to prevent such association, the path to reformation may thus tie made smoother, The cranberry growers of New Jersey have had hard luck for several years, and the news that this year's crop turns out to have been seriously damaged by late frosts last spring is not encouraging to those inclined to put capital into cranberry land. . The area of land upon ; which cranberries can be grown is confined to Dr Depew made forty-two speeches in, one day on a special train with Mr. Blaine in 1884. They were of great variety. Besides doing the butter making, cooking, washing, and housework for her family, an eighty-year-old woman, of Whitneyville, Me., walks a mile or two daily to pick blueberries, for which she gets about 8 cents a quart. , The' new Premier of Canada, Wilfrid Laurier, flno.iv-prtuca.ted French Canadian. As a party leader he is eloquent, magnetic, and en-rinweri with great popularity. Now nearly fifty- six years old. he is described as slender in per sen, active and handsome. . BACK AT WORK Free Silver and the Tariff. To the Bditor of The Inquirer. Is it true that the silver men at the last session of Congress would have agreed to a tariff revision provided the coinage law, as it was prior to 1873, was restored? An answer through ine Inquirer will greatly oblige. K. R. Undoubtedly they would have done so. Senator Teller, of Colorado, the leader of the silver Republicans in the Senate, voted for the McKinley Tariff bill in 1890, and Dubois, of Idaho; Mantle and Carter, of Montana, and Cannon, of Utah, who voted with , Teller to prevent the Dingley Tariff! bill from being even considered in the j Senate, were elected as Republicans j and protectiorjs. Besides these five I Senators Jones and Stewart, of Neva-j da, who were elected as Republicans and who had voted for the McKinley bill, would have gladly voted for any kind of a Republican tariff bill,- provided they could have secured the free and unlimited coinage of silver at the same time. These men place the interests of silver ahead of protection, the interests of . the silver miners ahead of the interests of all other classes of business men, and the interests of the silver mining States ahead o$the interests of the rest of the Union. Greenbacks anil the Deficiency. To the Editor of The Inquirer. Will you please give the total amount of di:terence between the government's receipts arid expenditures for the last three fiscal years? Also the amount of legal tender or so-called greenbacks in United States Treasury July 1, 1893 and July 1. 1896? Please answer in "Silver Questions," and oblige. Yours truly, WHITE HAVEN. During the last three fiscal years there has been an annual deficiency in the revenues, the total expenditures exceeding the total receipts by $137,-811,729.46, as follows: For the fiscal year ending June 30, 1894, $69,803,-260.58; for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1895, $45,805,223.18; for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1S96, $25,203.-245.70. The amount of United States notes or greenbacks in the Treasury on July 1, 18a was $27,621,590, against which therewere outstanding currency certificates amounting -to $12,365,000, leaving the net amount of greenbacks in the Treasury, $15,256,590. On July 1, 1896, there were in the Treasury greenbacks amounting to $121,229,658, aerainst which there were outstanding currency certificates amounting to $31,- 840,000, leaving the net amount of greenbacks in the Treasury, $89,3S9,-658. . ' Government Works on Labor, To the Editor of The Inquirer. Will you kindly give me a list of government matter, with address for securing it, .which has any bearing on the financial or labor problems, etc.? By so doing you will confer a favor upon JOSEPH F. TATLOW, 414 St. Mary street, Burlington. N. J. Write to Mr.. A. T. Huntington, Chief Division Loans and Currency, Treasury Department, Washington, D. C, for copy of Circular No. 129. Write to Mr. C. D. Wrigh.t. commissioner j or Mr. O. W: Weaver, chief clerk, of the Department of Labor, Washington, D. C, for any publications that bureau mav have bearing upon - the labor question. Write to Mr. F. F. Schrader, assistant secretary of the Republican Congressional Committee at Washington, D. C, for any matter that may have bearing upon either the financial or the labor questions. If you do not get what you want let us know and we will see if we can help you further. Tlie Mine-Owner. To the Editor of The Inquirer. Dear Sir: If the silver party snouia win and succeed in passing a free coinage of silver act. would the $1.00 piece coined for the mine owner be worth any more to him than to the working man? For instance, if they were worth 50 cents in gold and the working maw could only buy about half for his $1.00 piece as before the act was passed, could the mine owner or other person having silver coined get any more for his? F. B. I. Under the unlimited coinage of silver the silver dollar piece coined for the minp owner would be worth to him one hundred cents in the payment of debts whose terms do not require them to be paid in gold or some other specific article or form of money. They would be worth one hundred cents to him in the payment of his labor, for a time, at least: for it is a notorious fact that when money becomes depreciated wages are the last thing to rise to make good to the laborer such depreciation. When the coins passed out of his hands they would cease to have a fictitious value and would have to be passed at their real value, the mar ket price or the silver iney coniam. Aside from paying his old debts in depreciated silver money and buncoing his laborers witn mem, me suver mm owner would not, make anything out of unlimited coinage unless silver should rise Irf price in the market, in that case he would make the difference between what it is now and the pries to which it would go provided it rose at all. Even though silver should rise a little in price at first under unlimited coinage it would soaa fall and become -)ipnnf.r than it is now. ana tne mar ket price now is so low between 06 and 67 cents an ounce that the silver dollar is really worth only a fraction above ol cents. ver into coins or even into bars, and the government punishes any one who trespasses upon or tries to break up its monopoly of the coinage. . In this way all coins of the same denomination have the same weight and fineness, provided the government be honest, and most of them are in this respect, and have been in modern times, though formerly they used to debase their own coins by putting into them too much base metal or by making them light weight. It does not make any difference whether the coin minted or made by any other process by. a private person or persons is as good as the government's or not.- It punishes them just the same. The coin struck or moulded by private enterprise may not even be an exact copy of the coin Struck by the government mint. If it is in similitude thereof, an imitation likely to deceive the unwary or careless, the government punishes its maker. The government goes even further and punishes those who counterfeit foreign coins that circulate in this country. 3, If this country should adopt the free and unlimited coinage of silver, imported goods would appreciate in price as measured in silver. The unlimited coinage of silver would put this country on a silver basis; gold would go out of circulation and our silver money would fall to the market price of silver bullion, and all of our paper currency would fall with it. Not only would imported goods go up in price as measured in silver, but domestic goods would also go up. In the meantime the w.ges of those who could get work in such times as unlimited coinage would bring1' to the country times of business doubts disturbance and deeper depression than we have known during the past three years would remain nominally where they are now, but being paid in the depreciated silver they would be less by at least 40 to 50 cents on the dollar. 4. B.'s conclusion is sound. Playtime will soon be over, the schools will r, r an the sound of the younir ioea s reluctant and tearful shooting will soon be heard throughout the land. Baltimore American. Some of the people who are camping out these cool nights are beginning, to revise their theo-. tn what constitutes pleasure. Rochester Times. , . Homeward the summer tide is beginning to turn, and soon it will be strewn with the wreckage of trunks, baby carriages, bicycles, hammocks, freckles and flirtations. Baltimore American. Man boasts of his wisdom, and yet he will leave a cushiony hair mattress at home to go up In the country ana pay o a ween tor wie pi Allege of sleeping on an old bedtick irregularly stuffed Witn straw. somervuie juuinui. ' VERSES AS IS VERSES He told the old, old story, Till she to believe him grew, And married the man, and after that Most any old story would do. Detroit Tribune. "Mother, may I go out to swim?" ''Yes, my darling daughter; But cut your suit to show your limb And don't go near the water." Life. Tha Miss Ginger wears a dreadfully short Bkirt, doesn't she?" f'I haven't noticed it. "N oticed what, Mr. Bangs?" "Th-the skirt." Cleveland Plain Dealer., Tis now the woman up to date Has naught to be afraid of; She shows us, when upon the beach, . .., The kind of tuff she's made ofJuflg Gold as a Standard. To the Editor of The Inquirer. Will you please answer the following questions either by mail or through your columns: 1. Can a Presidential elector, who is elected by the Republican party change his vote and cast it for the Democratic party at his choice, or is he comnelled to vote for the candidate of the party by which he is elected? 2. Is the gold dollar of the United States equal in value to the gold dollar of every country where the gold standard is used? W. T. K. W. Under the Constitution and the laws enacted in pursuance thereof a Presi dential elector can vote for whomsoever he may see fit. If elected by the Republican party he can, if he see fit, vote for the candidate of the Demo cratic party. He is not compelled by law to vote for the candidate of the party that elected him. He can vote for any person he wants to, for President or for Vice-President, whether that person belong to his party or another, and regardless of whether the person has or has not been named by any party as a candidate. In short, a Presidential elector is free and un-trammeled as to whom he shall vote for, so far as the law goes. Custom however, often has the; force of written law, and custom has made it obligatory in honor for a Presidential elec-. tor to vote for the candidates of the party which elected him. 2. The gold dollar of the United States is equal to the geld dollar or any other coin of anv country on earth which contains the same amount of pure gold that is, 23.22 grains. It aoes not make any difference what the standard of a country is, gold has the same value therein, for its commercial and coining values are the same. An ounce of pure gold is worth $20.67, coined or uncoined, the world over. and regardless of whether the particular country in which the gold is is a saver or a gold standard country. The Only Bimetallism. From the Chlcag-o Times-Herald. No silver standard eountrv Tia anv gold in its currency. Every gold standard country has silver in its currency. There Is no such thing as a concurrent circulation of the two metals on equal terms at the mints. Where silver is the standard irold will not run. Where gold is the standard silver runs co-ordinately in limited coinage only. Mexico, a silver standard country, has no gold Japan, a silver standard country, with 40,000,000 people, has no gold. India with its 296.000.000 of neoole. has no gold. China, with its 300,000,000 of people, has no gold. On the other hand. Germany, with 51,-000,O(i0 of people, carries full legal ten- oer suver to tne amount or $iOa,oou,iou. Belgium, with its 6,000,000 of people, has full legal tender silver to the amount of $48,000,000. Switzerland, with 3,000,000 of people and $14,000,000 in gold, has legal tender silver to the amount of $10,-000,000. France has full legal tender silver exceeding $430,000,000. The United states, with i0.tKi,ooo or people, has more. than $500,000,000 full egal tender silver. No country on the gold standard opens its mints to the unlimited coinage of silver. That Is the reason silver is current in those countries as full legal tender with gold. Will the American people retain their silver at its preatnt valuation of 100 cents to the dollar, or. abandoning the only practicable system of bimetallism, will they sacrifice all their gold and go down to the level of China, India, Japan and Mexico? adelphians were among the guests. Mr. and Mrs. James A. Arthur have been spending a couple of weeks at Ocean City. Lispenard Stewart, the well-known New Yorker, is the gayest bachelor in Newport social life. He gives-three or four dinners every week and always has several friends as his guests. His popularity in society is great, beinar ' good-looking, wealthy, generous, well educated and clever. Mr. and Mrs. E. Burton Hart art at Chautauqua, N. T. Miss Lillie Wainewright and Miss Katharine Wainewright are two American girls who are receiving a great deal of attention at Lucerne.Switzer-land. Though residing in New York, the Misses Wainewrights are almost as well known in this city, where they spend a portion of every winter. They are nieces of Mrs. Margaret Cushing Halliday, of Twentieth and Arch streets. At fashionable Dinard Mrs. Charles McCrea and the Misses McCrea; of Philadelphia, are entertaining more than any other Americans. While ftt Chamounix, In the Savoy Mountai, Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Hare, Mrs. Hollen Brown, Miss Brown. Miss Hill, Miss Harris, Miss Veil and Miss Allister are principal persons in the season's gaye-ties. . . From St. Moritz comes the news that many beautiful Baltlmoreans and Philadelphians are here. The Will- ings, the Bronsons and the Ways are some of the notable Quaker City families represented. Mr. and Mr. Thomas Else. Mr. and Mrs. De Witt, Mr. and Mrs. G. M. Klttie and Miss Florence Jones are the Philadelphians at Vichy. Philadelphians are flocking into Paris at present, a few of them being Mr. and Mrs. H. Ashmead, Marie Brolasky, Francis Brandt. John Borsch and family, Edward Burt, C. Darnell, Mr. and Mrs. Meyer Gerson. G. Herzberg, Charles Holzher and family, the Messrs. Nutall, Dr. Ott, Mr. and Mrs. Francis Potts. Miss Rumble and H. Pool. Dr. and Mrs. Henry C; Chapman will remain at Bar Harbor until the latter part of September. Mr, and Mrs. John Baily- were at Atlantic City over Sunday. Mr. and Mrs. P. S. P. Randolph will return home from Narragansert Pier about September 20. Miss Katherine Howell, gave a tea at Cane May at which several of Philadelphia's debutantes were present. Rev. Dr. Charles Wood, of German-town, is sojourning at Lenox, Mass. DREER'S NURSERY Florists ' Inspect tne Great Greew hopie 'and .'.Are .. Enter'talnea.jf 7-? Over Ave hundred florists and gar deners of Philadelphia and vicinity,' with their families, were entertained yesterday afternoon at the Henry A. Dreer, Inc., Nursery, River ton, N. J. The guests were taken up the river on the steamer Twilight and were, met at the wharf by Jacob Deisle, superintendent of the nursery. An -Inspection was then made of the hot houses and gardens, where plants and flowers were shown in all the stages of development. ' An object lesson of great interest ta the visitors was the new greenhouse, which covers an acre of ground. One roof, of glass, covers the entire structure and Is supported by arches made of hollow pipes, which are perforated so that they can be used to spray water on the plants. This immense conservatory has a capacity for over 900,-000 plants and Is heated by four 45-horse-power boilers. After the inspection of the grounds, refreshments were served on the lawn adjoining the lily ponds. Otto Thilow, who represented Mr. Dreer, presided and the speakers were Robert Craig, C. H. Allen, president of the New York Florists' Club, and" D. D. L. Farson, of Philadelphia. - The speakers in turn expressed their appreciation of Mr. Dreer's hospitality and spoke in admiration of his large and well-equipped nursery, which, they said, was a credit to Philadelphia. The Zero Point. To t.hp. Editor of The Inauirer. i ' Tn -wmi- answer to Inauirer of this date you say if a free silver law should prevail the bullion coined would be handed back to the owners, and would be the property of theirs, the governments not being in any way respon- .Ihla fnr Bllfh coins. 2. I desire to ask in case such coins o omintdi-fpited. whose loss will it be, and whose duty will it be to run down the counterfeiters? 3 I also desire to ask if free silver prevails, will imported goods be appreciated or depreciated? H 4 I have always contended that gold should occupy the place in the world s money barometer that the zero point, does in a thermometer, viz.: a point from which tto gauge all values. B. 1. The free and unlimited coinage of silver ori private account means that the government will, at its mints, receive from individuals any bullion they may have, coin It into standard silver dollars gratuitously, at the legal ratio, now 1 to 15.98, and hand the coins to the owner of the bullion. These coirs would be the private property of the owner or owners of the bullion The government would be under neither legal nor moral responsibility to maintain the value of the dollars so coined. It would be all one to the government whether they were worth a dollar each or only fifty cents. As it is now, the government having closed its mints against the coining of silver dollars for individuals, or on private account, as the technical term is and having bought silver bullion and coined from it silver dollars on its own account, buying at the commercial ratio and coining at the legal ratio of 15.98 to 1, keeping the difference between the commercial and the legal ratio sixteen ounces of silver not being equal to one ounce of gold the government under these circumstances Is in honor bound to maintain the parity between its silver dollars and gold, and has so declared in a formal statute. This is the responsibility in regard to silver dollars that the government would berelievt d of Oar Fathers Left Vm Free. ' A song for "the new Union." . Our fathers left us priceless gifts: Our fathers left us free! And now we calt their sons as one To say that this shall be; Our children's chilren then may come And swear as we now swear To sweeo all clouds of infamy From Freedom s haliowd air! Shall our fathers' sons not stand As one, ' to stem this flood, And save our Godlike heritage They bought with their best blood? Oh! banish all dissensions far . And let us all agree From black Repudiation's curse To keep our country free ! Can patriots prate of party ties Whilst scheming traitor's stand. Flaunting the flags of Anarchy Athwart this Freedom's land? We have one common birthright One covenant to-day, This vile Populistic monster Of Anarchy to slay! Oh! let us strike as brothers strike. Forgetting things now past; To shield our honor and our rights Untarnished to the last. From banking house and factory From field, and shop and mill; With new fire of love and duty Come forth from vale and hill! Let our trusts, our debts and compacts Be sacred, as of old. And all our toiling millions still Be paid as good as gold: Let us, like our brave fathers, fall; If we at last go down And free each sacred conscience clear From Bryan's cross and crown!' A SON OF THE REVOLUTION. (Whose father was with Washington at Valley Forge). H. D. Forsee, Sr., Delanco, N.. J., 73 years old 24th of last June. THEY WERE WASHED Wearly 100,000 Persons Patronised the Public Baths Last Weelc. During the week ending on Saturday last 97,709 men, women and children patronized the several public bath houses. These figures show a large decrease as compared with former weeks, due to the cool weather which prevailed. ' The number of patrons of each bath house will be found in the annexed table: Men, Women. Boys.Glrln. Wharton and Twelfth 10,353 51 21,308 223 Thirtv-third and South 144 5 1.026 . 107 Thirty-second & Ridge 2,010 59 12.1RO 234 Eiehth and Mifflin 1,243 J3 6.8SO 182 27th and Master 3.P9S flfl 21.400 174 Shackimaxon 2,052 55.13,890 153 19,700 249 76,682 1,078 rotals. Carina for the Poor. The report of Edward H. Rowley, treasurer of the Sanitarium Association for the seventy working days since the opening of the grounds, shows that 129,-412 women and children were admitted. The bathers numbered 11,443 boys, 16,233 girls and 2011 infants. An average of fifteen sick children with their mothers were admitted to the hospital every day. The season is drawing to a close and more money is urgently needed to carry on the benevolent work until the grounds are close ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. (All replies to queries are published a soon at possible after being received . at this office, but it often, happens that where the questions asked are very intricate they cannot be ansioered within a week, and in extraordinary cases more time is required. It is impossible to answer queries on a certain day. Complicated, legal and medical queries will not be answered in this paper.) REGULAR. History has not preserved the name of either of the engineers in question, but you can no doubt learn the name of one by applying to the Edison Company and the other by writing ta the Union Traction Company. QUERIST. Congress , appropriates every year whatever may be necessary to pay the running expenses of the White House. There Is no fixed amount paid to the President over and above his salary. C. H. S. On the fiftieth link In the chain letters wovld go out to the number of 42.870.631.8.'0.77y,li5.f51,333.018, and the total number of the letters would be 461,205.867,324.214.073.205.460.421. CONSTANT READER. For a copper cent, of thin die, dated 1Sj. two dollars have been paid and with, fillet head one and two dollars are the regular quotations. " GOLDBECK. It is only necessary to look at the advertisements of boarding schools in the advertising columns of this paper to make a satisfactory selec-r tlon. . -r o There were two issues of stamps disDlaVlniT a head of Washington and Lars. The first was in 1851 Land the second in 1855. , BVinER. Tn? Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art Is the Institution you want to study in. REGULAR READER Your twenty-eiKht minutes to go nine miles on city and country roads is very good time. rr. A r. The length of the steamer ReDublic i 2S2.01 The Republic has 86 B ?t beam and 10.08 feet hold. METZGER.-A newspaper almanac and a. railroad guide are the books required for the purpose indicated. Tha Kin- of Fill la Beactaam's BEBCHAITi

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