The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on October 13, 1930 · Page 1
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 1

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Monday, October 13, 1930
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Served by the United Press BLYTHEVILLE COURIER NEWS THE DOMINANT NEWSPAPER OP NORTHEAST ARKANSAS AMP. sOTTrm-ARr ,,T O C. **••*- 1 -m^fl f f ^_y NORTHEAST ARKANSAS AND SOUTHEAST MISSOURI VOL. XXVII—NO. 179 Blythevllle Courier, Blytheyllle Herald, Blytlwville Dally Hews, Mississippi Volley Lcndor. HLYTUKVILLH, ARKANSAS. MONDAY, OCTOHKU i:~J," Health Appeal Changing Food Habits of America " i SINGLE COPIES FIVg!CENTB SEEK BETTER COTTON MARKET Queen of Oneens FDR II! *•/>! 'Fear of Lynching Alleged in Case of Man Wanted for At lacking Officer. Nation's Appetite Saner mi • 1 iaai ° ilian in Generations Past IS I n.'-piiUcd in llic- latest effort la j secure the return of Charles Whil- j more, negro, here from St. Louis to ; face aei assault charge for atuick- j ing an officer, the state of Arkansas apparently faces a prolonged legal battle in i;s aitempt to bring the negro to trial Stanley Hancock, deputy sheriff, nrnuxl with proper paiicr.s signed by : governors of Arkansas and Mis- jsciirl, went lo St. Louis Friday to i return Whitmore here but wns j forced lo return empty handed i when he was served with a writ of | habeas corpus by attorneys for • Whitmore who succeeded in wrest-- c ; ling the negro from the Mississippi county deputy pending n hearing later in the month. Once before ' the negro wns released under bond , 'or a long period while his return j here was sought. rs of St. Louis has been en- to fight Whitmcrc's return BY IIKI.F.N NKA Service Writer | than men. Contrary to the old be. lief, they order as much pie, too, is the as their fathers a .,:, U ic oL.-ojmiiiicu Danner'Vs' Sv'nr C ir« a: ' a aM plllnp!lin P i(? snre in the habeas corpus proceedings tiie America:i national anthem j ' " was tnc complaint that Whitmore KEEtiurant men and women • Roasl hecf . ; eads the meal pi- ! would be lynched or killed should •.\ho met in Cleveland for their riuic ; thc potato is the favorite j lle be r*t"«ied here. i;at..jnal convention, admit that ve §etable; liver lias risen to a ! Whitmore escaped a posse here an eclair increases its appeal if it ' ea <"ng position because it U T is ccated with chocolate, and health food, nnd lemon, not that -this flavor does more to-, 1 va ni'a, is second to chocolate ns v/ards yuttinj a custard pudding | a popular flavor. ..„ ..— —— D .... ~..tiQ.ii^i otii, uuuvc, ui riouisier It has been reliably reported here Mo., is a Queen of'Queens! That's that one of the leafilng criminal the tii!e conferred upon her as ihe '" """ "' C1 "" lU '"•" '""" ""- newly elected president of the -- —— student body at Queens College In here, local officers say that sev- Charlotte, N. C. As if that were eral parltes here as well as n negro not enough to keep her busy, she welfare organization are Interested is vice president of Alpha. Kappa in the defense. Gamnin nnd is a member of a Jour- Among the allegations set forth nalism order—nnd stands high in her classes! - n the map than Byrd did in get- iing ihe South Pole the same pub- last summer alter attacking Constable Elbert Taylor and beating p th,? officer over Ihe head with a ] pistol. He was arrested on n whis- Men have a habit of ordering a i 1:y char B« at the time.' meat, r, vegetable (99 out of times it is.a potato), .a • b 100 j hcity. _ . America hes" a healthier. 3 PP£ t i t c 1 hu.r' i t did ° f cv, ngo, the restaurateurs admit," but j '<^<?A, ^r*" th JifH 'r 6 ^ . mcnu5 - there'are p. few foods, such as ap-!™, L IMP L,n,. '"• SW " pic pie and potatoes, which stage.,™ 1 ' As the weather grows colder, a perennial marathon and alwnvsj ?0 °' choose heavier focd! win. ' i Men Prefer Old Standards More Vegetables, Less Fats j However, men are being edu- "Men and women should eati c!Ueti to lfi t up on meat and the same focds," explained George j choose a salad and vegetable, the M. Stcusi'.ton of St. Paul, a for- restaurant people have observed. jiiCr president of the national as- They do it to promote health, no; Kcciaticn. and one of Its most ac-'to cast a slender shadow, livo directors. "Their appetites I A girl or a woman will trv " nre very much alike, too. Both fancy new dish. But a man will have learned lo appreciate, food values. Diet has ircreasc-d the American vegetable appeal ' ' "ipratt and his wne i „._„ , uornnn na^, . The increase! amount- of milk which American men are drinking is another feature which surprises the food experts. Women must eat. of course, but . pass it by. He prefers the tried and true. He doesn't, have an in- cruldn't get along with just one ."teak tcclay. Both would want the lean. Neither would choose the fat. "Green, leafy vegetables are mere in demand lhan the- yellow vegrubles." he continued. "Sev-1 the rcstnurnnt he favorites. Now spinach, lettuce and fom.itoes are increasingly pcpular. People are think- in? about their health, nnd are nv:re interested in mineral matter and vllsmlns than in calories." The restaurant, men insist that ^r-optr 1 sl'.onld eat butter. The old irlrp. that it is fattening is nil wrcr~. Tt Is needed, so they say, for bcR^h-pivin? proiiorties. . Alt'ion^ri evcr>' restaiinmt man V-as P full-si7.e menu, lie prefers that liis patrrns choose healthy ccnibirntions. Meat brings a hi<rlicr price, of course, but- he admits that it is needed to build up the Continue Anti-Typhoid.-,, Campaign in County The Mississippi County Health Unit is continuing its immunization program with special smphn- sis upon typhoid fever and diphtheria at the present. Schools are being visited and inoculations given those who attend the weekly clinics here on Saturday. Sludents of the Manila school were given smallpox Vaccinations last week and will 'begin typhoid inoculations' this week. Keiser students were also vacclnnt- ed for smallpox nnd pupils of the Riverside and Lost Cane schools took their first doses of toxin antitoxin. There were 300 who received typhoid inoculations and 15 diphtheria here Saturday. . . . people prefer to ernl years a.>;o ccrn and peas were; see hungry men at the door Not „.. ,„,.«*,«„ „,„... __,_..u ,.. Decause the men arc easier suited. or like potatoes! Because the\ invariably have larger checks! School Problem Reversed In Washington Situation OLYJUPIA, Wash., (UP)— How to get children to go to school is a freqwnt problem, but in Clark County the usual order hns been reversed. Dale McMullen. prosecutor, wrote to ask the attorney general's office whether a high school had to ad- mil persons who had already graduated as students. inonly not to give strength for ar work, as thought. once com- do will, prole's Hkes." Stoujhton a child hns befn medicine In milk he will dislike milk when ,he prows up. likes and continued. forced to to dis- , tUrson's. assist- is- • ' - . "If 1 ant atton «y general, answer to the ucr Poultry Loving Brakeman Finds Chicken Beating Ride - ARKADELPHIA, Ark. (UP)— Milt Garland, negro brakeman o"n the Gnrdrn, Eldorado division of the Missouri Pacific line l»IIs a story of a chicken "stealing a ride" on the brake rigging of the train. Garland said when, the engine was being turned at Drifting he got off ttv? train and was locking around - he or.v something white on the bottom rod which he thought to be a newspaper caught by the suction, but on investigation the "white thing" turned out to be a whits leghorn hen restln? on the rod. Garland being a "poultry lover" caught the hen and carried her home wlier; the "hobo foul" was taken care of. take! mother (mined him to cat mashed i Blue-Winged Teal Ducks IHold Services Sunday | for Pinkerman Infant poiatore; h» is foil) 1 ? to insist on n mound of them next to his pork chno Or roast beef." Tomatoes arc gaining In fawr everywhere, nnd restaurant man; are glad. , Arrive in North Carolina! day S Funeral services were held Sunjy afternoon fcr Billie Jean Pinkerman, nine months old son of Mr. Bech'c Man Was Elected Commander of> Confederate Veterans Last \Veck. UKKIiE, Ark., Oct. 13. (UP)—' Qt-ncral - D. T. Kfarlln, 85, stnte commander of Ihe Arkansas Confederate soldiers, died at, his home here shortly before noon today. His death was aUrlbntfd lo acute indigestion. . General Martin was chosen state commander by tiie Confederates al Uielr annual meeting at Little Rock last week. He was well known in the stale, being listed as one of the olde.it living Civil War vetc-r- an.i In this section. He enlisted in the Southern, army during the early d«ys of the conflict, and- .served throughout the war. taking part In .several major tattles. fMnernl services will be held here Wednesday, It's a lo', to be a Queen. But fair Margaret Bell, above, of ' iiq«or.Firjures in Numerous^ r. —^ ' -D^r L-*''Y>' r iJ .*. Cases in 'Po!ic£'''Court This Morning. Three $100 fines were meted on; by Judge W. D. Gravette in police court this morning. Two were- assessed for driving while intoxicated with P. M. Brewer of Memphis and Bill Payne being convicted 'on th« charges. . James Elam, negro, who couldn't keep his feet still with a half pint in his pocket when officers walked into the pool room where he wns standing, received a S100 fine for transporting. Elam attempted t? mnke a getaway but was nabbed •*•- " &«-"*••» uj UUL, uiis naocea. IL . .. His attorney, E..E. Alexander,, op- Crawford Nobl pealed the cose. George Ingram was fined $25 for reckless driving. Five were fined $15 on charges of public drunkenness. Little Girl Smothers to Death in Cotton TOONE, Tenn., Oct. 13. (UP) — Ail eight-year-old daughter of Mr. nnd Mrs. John Leathers wns smothered to death here late yesterday when she plunged headlong Into a hole in some loose cotton that awaited ginning. fnl'iii-ialnl Camels Plan \Vai-Upon Prohibition Law IJTTU3 ROCK. Oct. 13. (UP)- Mmked Interest was manifest here '.odny In the country 1 * newest nn- tl-prohiWlion organization, the Aroused nnd Arllculnlc Order of ".nturlated Camels, coinpc.wd of SO jitile Rock men and women who iled incorporation papers here late Sturdily, Clalbomc Laflevty, UlUe Rock • llonicy anil president of (lie "Initiated, ciimels" ex]iresse<l confidence linn the movement will ilirond rapidly to oilier Arknnbtis rltles and adjoining slates and In lime would have Klmi|tcrs llmi- ont the country. The incorjioratc papers slate the 2ntnels hnve seen enough and nre fully convinced prohibition cannot x enforced, fnvor re|H?«l of the Slghlcenth amendment. Jones and Volstead laws, establishment ot a system of federal or state sale of liquor In localities rcriucsllng It by •efercndum, protection of bone dry areas and punishment for Hie sale of liquor to any person under 21 years of age. j| In explaining Iho views of th; organization LalTerty said. "Pro- ilbitlon Is an economic rather lian n moral Issue. We ndmit that fill of us would be belter off without liquor. Our effort therefore Is .0 be directed lo organization ra- llicr Hum Argument." Dyersburg Calls State Aid in Meningitis Fight UYERSBURG, Tcnn., Oct. 13. IUP)—Dr. James A. Crabtree, director of the department of preventable diseases with the stale health department was due to arrive here today to direct the fight against spinal meningitis described by authorities as in epidemic stages. Will Not Review Case Against Levee District WASHINGTON, Oct. 13, (TJP> — Review of the breach of contract suit of McWIlliams Dredging Company of Memphis. Tenn., agsulnsl the White Rlve r levee district wns 'dinled by the supreme court today.' •'...-.. The dredging company .was em ployed to build. ditches to take care of. waters from ihe Cache rive r -when it wns found the levees nJong White river did not. fully protect the area from flood. Poultry Honors at Fair JONESBORO, Ark. — Crawford Many Week End Motor Accidents at Memphis MEMPHIS, Oct. 13. CUPJ-Auto- moblle mishaps on highways nnd streets In the Memphis area resulted in the death of one person and injuries to 17 others over the week end. M. E. Wyatl. 59. automobile dealer of Meadeville, Pa., died cnr- P the Hotel Noble Poultry Farm, lit eraily rncpped up with his chickens at the Arkansas Slate Pair. He won seven loving cups and more than $150 In cash awards. Only three ot the 88 birds he took to 'the fair fall- , ., - ly loday from Injuries received yes- state. terday. Wyatt's machine left the highway near Marion, Ark., and overturned. Tiie condition of Mrs. Wyatt, whc was riding with her husband atlrl! time of the accident, is critical and physicians doubt her recovery. Chicago House Publishes Song by Chester Riggins Chester Riggins, son of Mr. and Mrs. L. E. Riggins, 410 North Fifth tsreet, and sports writer and newspaperman for a Jonesboro paper, has written a song entitled " " ...t., m utLu* Hi. i-wlx l,u mi. lail KH»- yfiUd IU IjcaVenWOrlll ptillUCIHll ed to place. Those three will soon and McElvough to 13 nionDis. be served as milk-feed chicken in — the Hotel Noble Dining Room. There were 1100 chickens in tho Supreme Court Refuses show and the number of places that Mr. Noble's 68 ccpped Is a record that challenges all olhcrs in this d Ku| r| . May K«:gain Thron Jane Barnes Injured In Accident Last Night Jar.e Barnes, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. G. S. Barnes, sustained cuts about her lace in an automobile accident near Haytl, Mo., last night. According to reports, the car in which the girl wns riding, driven by her brother, Ooah Barnes, was struck by n negro's cnr. Miss Barnes received first a I d treatment at the Blylhcvllle hospital but was later removed lo her home on Wplnut slreet. Missing Child, Feared Kidnapped, Found Today HAMMOND, Hid.. Oct. 13. (UPt —Rose Mnric Delcnelbor, 18-inonlli old girl, who has been missing all night and wns believed kidnaped, was found unharmed today by police two blocks from her home. The Mule girl apparently had wnndercd in the vicinity of her home all night while 1.000 Boy Scouts and iwlicc searched the neighborhood. Constitutionality ot Jones Liquor Law Challenged WASHINGTON. 3 (U P'~ 8 Mo., which was denied a review by the supreme court today. Drown was sentenced to four ycais at Leavenworth penitentiary Bank Assessment Review , "Whisper Low." which Is being in "A tomato cocktail contains the nutcmcbile world, are more num- same important food values which I erous than ev,?r in Ocracoke waters oranges d-." Sloughton explained. , this year. These sport model duties OCRACOKE ISLAND, N. C. (UP) pni Mrs. Sam Pinkerman who sue — Blue-winged leal, to the duck climbed at. tho family home on """up" ""*'•" wmcn is oeing m- world what midget cars are to the j South Division Street Saturday tr °duced in Chicago by Louis Pani num- D'lernoon. The baby was stricken!' 00 an< ' nls Canton Tea Garden or- suddenly and succumbed afterl crles ' ra - Edwin Hnll wrote the mu- - i sic for the song, published by Kim- has left everything „„ baec and spinach which are having n bigger and bigger place In th? stew—pretty much in the garden. . People should eat their biggest j meal at neon, according (o this food expert. Luncheon and din- ! ner should be reversed. And eat- ' ing breakfast should be ns im- ] ncrtant n rite as crushing your | , OosnelljbaH Hall, of Chicago. ranges d". Sloughton explained. , tnis year. These sport model duclts on '* a few tlours illness. The tomato's riK! to popularity | stop over on their flight to the 'rice I The Rev - Wim«ms O f oosnell, - ,as left everything else—even cab- "elds farther south where tbey! oiliciated at the service? and Inter-1 The new waltz ballad is being acre nnri ^ninnrh which a™ imvinw spend the winter but usunliv havp' mcr *t was made at North Sawbalheard In Jonesboro- tonight with left before November 1 when It is i" Ccmotery ' ""^ Cobb Un <iertakln?iMiss Amma Matthews, who lived | 'igal lo shoot th«m In'Nnrih ror I C 0111 ! 11 " 1 ^ W3S lu charge ot funeral here a number of years ago. in vo .„... - nonn ^ar-1 arrargemenU . ... , ._., , ,^_ ... olinn. The teal ny in and out among the mallards, but never follow the large birds lo their feeding place. 'UK ngo ceased to be n fcnit of fried potatoes and ham stid eE?s. which is quite all right. A brver.igr. fruit or frill rerr-.ll »«d toasl. will b crotieh 'o start thr day's f. ?ram. But the stomach needs sonic material on which to perform Its pxtrciscs, Wmnnn have n RWffter *onth Checks for $1,600 Charged Against Cannos LO3 ANGELES, Oct. 13. (UP)— A£i r> i »c ~ Richard M. Cannon, son of Bish- Atter (jospel IHeetinffs on Jomes " Cannon J r -. was charged . . B with passing $1,600 in worthless . C al Interpretation of Ihe new number ar.d Prince Parkhurst at the organ, pel meetings Watkins. A. nnijelisl, i series of i . by G. E. missionnry -•••• ..... r >' Academy in which he has ' i " IlUECI lntcrcsL Nclll ° Bennelt. isald to be an aunt of Cannon, was Last Rites Saturday for Albert Daniel Jones | Last rKcs were held Saturday | tfl e heights of grand opera is hoM hu'Ai'A'T for AIbnt Don'«l Jones, two year; Miriam Leilanl, a Chinese-Ha- nuu oy aeputj j old ^^ „(• M ^ s EfTi j g tac|{ _ ^j^njn glr i who is j^,!^ by voi^ night. A movi; >lar? A Wall Street- brckcr? A clolhlng advertisement? No, Oils fashionably dressed man is King George, the, exiled ruler of Greece, pictured here in London. It hns been t rumored th«t he will be recalled to the throne of.hla'na- livc country If the nionarcriteU rc- galn ccinlrol of tlic'govefnniient j Lower Production, Higher ! consumption Only Rente- : dies Says Carl Williams.., NEW ORLEANS, Oct. 13 (TJP)i. The remedy for Ihft depression Iri the cotUm market which has forced' prices below Hie 1914 . level lies elthen lu decrease In production or stimulation bf consumption, Carl Williams, cotton expert for trie" federal farm board, said here today. ' • '• ,-; ' . Williams, wllh Chairman Alexander Leggo of the farm board, and Secretary of Ccmmerce Lorhorit! met here with southern cotton shippers nnd members of the' New Orleans and New York cotton exchange.'! to discuss means for restoring confidence In the cotton" murket. Eugene Meyers, chairman of. the federal icserve .board was expected Nearly 100 leading cotton men of Hie south were on hand. All came nl the Invitation of D. E. McCuen of Greenville, S. C.. president of tto American Cotton Shippers Associa-' tion, who called the meeting "r' I Harmonizing of views in the in. • tcrest of betterment, of the cotton situation- was the chief goai I of tho conference. I A possible conflict between shippers and federal farm board mem- [ tiers was apparent through Intimation that the shippers regarded heir function as being usurped by the board, but Me. Ciwn was seek- : Ing lo preserve amity. - ' "The purpose of this meeting Is to reestablish the lntrla<sic price of. cotton and if possible t-> stop tho decline of prices through :brlniirie about a permanent, recoveryVK Cuen «»id in expressing hla'l («r.far .reaching results.' : '-~ :' «*..... P. Cretkrnori,. vic^-' •^-'-' ri Magnolia Football Player Suffers Amputation Following Accident Friday. MAGNOLIA, Ark., Oct. 13 (UP) —Jack Clemenl.s, 19, star freshman football player at Magnolia A. and M. underwent an operation lor am- putntlon of.his nrm yesterday In a HayneLville, La. hospital according to word r.xelvcd here today. Clements' arms was badly mangled when tho bus in which he was riding with olher members of the Magnolia team was side-swiped by a car near Hayiravillc last Friday. Two other players suffered broken arms m the accident. German Reichcstag Opens Sessions Amid Tumult BERLIN, Oct. 13. (UP)-The opening session of the new Reich- slag today was accompanied by fascist demonstrations in i.vavioi. uL-jiiunsirauons in tne WASHINGTON, Oct. 13 iUP>- chaml >er and rioting in the heart Action of the board of supervisors or '''e capital where police clashed I cf Harrison county. Miss., in taxing *"" demonstrntnrs the assets ot banks tor their lu" i.Lt uoi^ii U i uan^ iui im-H i«i After half a day of miner dis- value while other property was or ders outside the RelclisUig police "."es.'ert at 05 per cent of its mar- chased demonstrators to a near- ket value will not bo reviewed, thc^y square where fighting contin- <1lnrr-nirt ismirF iTn.~irTil/l l/vlrt V* I ThC U'itlflnvl'i: nf I Tin Vit-r llTn^U lioii with o»lc« here said h-3~was : to ndend the dueling today as "an Invited guest" nnd was without any advance Information on, its probable results. / J, Seek Cooperation of Auto Manufacturers HOPE. Ark., Oct. 13- (UP)— Efforts to bolster the southern cot- Ion market and automobile Industries- resulted in a movement launched today by six Arkansas newspapers suggesting that Amerl-' can automobile manufacturers 4c- cepl a bale of cotton on the'pur- churc f any automobile sold in the. south. The proposal was contained in a telegram filed from here to' the Ford Motor company, Chrysler, General motors, the Nash company and Studobaker coriwration, and read: "We . suggest and urge you announce on each purchase of j-our car throughout the south you "will take as part payment ne bale ol cotton at 475. Handled through cooperatives you can secure - at least $«5 on each bale. Also suggest that your 'puchasing department make necessary cotton purchases, everything else being equal, . so far as possible Ihrough coopera- lnc lives. This will greatly stimulate purchase of motor cars and, stabilize cotton prices." The tetegram was signed by the supreme court decided today. The windows ot the big Werheim department store near (here and other shops nnd cafes were smashed. Neighboring stores put sip iron shutters as police reinforcements were rushed to the scene to halt disorders. Hope Star, Camdei} News, El Dora do News, ElDorndo Evening Times, Hot Springs New Era nnd Hot Springs Sentlnal Record. Scout Training Saves Life of Young Child OGDEN. Utah, (UPI — Quick thinking In emergencies taught young boys by scout lenders is-thc|" rr- — j, •• — principal reason three-year-old by Hitnter. Is Near Death Keith Murray is alive fxtny. ' Keith was pull;d on: of n five , Mississippi Boy, Wounded ! School Burglars Fail to 'Find Grid 'Receipts , Burglars who ransacked the of.' flee of Crawford Greene, superin* fool sink, hole bv Jack Sims, 15. Ha~rr7i£nt' 2 v^r on 'f\, , boy scout. Unconscius and near Mrs . L Ja ',' ! ""^^ , , ". a death, the child wns quickly re- „ wounded 'by an^unidentiW vivcd by the scout who fc.v:w ex-1 hunter here late yesterday actly what to do to revive r •'"" - —-- - - *"«-'"">• Ing person. - out^ era drown- The boy climbed up In a tree to look: for a squirrel he had shot. He was hidden by thick leaves and it * 'nou lock the door. It is believed that the prowlers were seeking the football game receipts but these are never left at the school overnight, Mr. Green says. , _ I j- «, , t !* 'nought the rustling leaves at- TL 1 D • ti Indian Monument for I tra cted the attention of the hunt- 1 * hanks Business Houses Sioux Lookout Planned NORTH PLATTE, Neb.. (UP)—j The erection of a monument at the j spot where the Sioux Indians formerly watched the flow ol immigrants westward over- the Oregon trail has bwn proposed nnd the ! from the boy's side. taken •. I Interment v*s made at the North Sawba Ccjuctci-y. The Cobb Un- graphed on the liner City Angeles as she sailed from „„..,„,. nla for Hawaii, to make her first . - awa, o ae er rst dertakbvj Compaq was In charge concert appearance on the island nf ItinPrnl nrrnrmimnrnte I . , . . J*»»IM waft born. Nationalists Claim Decisive Victory Which Closed for Game ; A number of local business firms closed Friday afternoon during tha |BlyU;eville-Jor.esboro football gama ;so that their employes might attend the game. In a statement issued today by trail has bwn proposed nnn tne «tr»vfttrAT - I '" a statement issued toaay By county commissioners have been r" J ?^ OHAI . China, Oct. 13. (UP , Crawford Greene, superintendent ve vl asked to appropriate mercy. ra . A petition asking the co.-r>.!sslon- 1 ers for the monument lu? been t Ma.well and Brady, —., , vt .,ii U| ^n. 10i iur j ^iHsviuiu vjieene, iupermienaenc i -uecislve victories for the nation- of schools, he voices the appwcU- forces in which 30.- Itlon of the school and Us student m '' lc<1 a " d founded were the cmtrtl body for this and other courtesies •' WEATHER day partly cloudy.

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