The Terre Haute Tribune-Star from Terre Haute, Indiana on January 3, 1971 · Page 42
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The Terre Haute Tribune-Star from Terre Haute, Indiana · Page 42

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Sunday, January 3, 1971
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ISU Triumphs; Notre Dame Is Back Bob Barker Has II Points Northern Illinois' Zone Defense Troublesome By DOUG ORMAN Tribune Sports Writer Indiana State remained undefeated and on top in the Midwest Conference as they upended the Northern Illinois Huskies, 97-94, Saturday night at the Arena The win makes the Sycamores 2-0 in conference action and 8-3 overall. The victory was also the, Sycamores' sixth straight. Bbb Barker led the Syca mores in the scoring depart mcnt as the 6-4 senior pumpec through 22 points and pulled down 8 rebounds. Barker was followed closely by George Pillow who connecter for 21 markers and 11 rebounds Danny Bush and Howard Wil Hams threw in their share o points as they scored 18 and 12 points, respectively. The Husky scoring was pacec by Cleveland Ivey with 23 point which was high for the contest Ivey was supported by four oth er teammates in double figures Tom McKiernan 17, Larry Jack son with 15 and Billy Harri with 14. The Sycamores jumped out t a two-point lead but the Huskic quickly countered and pulle •head 8-3 and stayed there fo the remainder of the half. The Sycamores had troubl with the .Huskies' zone defens during the first half, and foum themselves down by as man; as 11 points on more than on occasion. The Sycamores were playin rather conservative ball the firs half as they were not called for a personal foul for almost 11 minutes. As a result the Huskies scored only four points from the free throw line. The Sycamores on the- other hand scored 12 of their first half points from the free throw line. With 3:30 to go in the first half, the Sycamores found themselves down by 11 points and haying trouble getting anything going—that was until Sherman Lester stepped in to lend a hand. The G-3 forward from Indianapolis popped through five quick points and gaVe needed assistance under the boards to help pull the Sycamores to within six points by halftime 44-38. The Sycamores hit on 13 of 33 field goal attempts for a cool 39.4 per cent from the field. The Huskies hit on 20 of 47 from th0'-,field for a slightly warmer 42.6 per cent. The second half proved to be more successful for the Sycamores as they canned a remarkable 62.2 per cent from the field on 23 of 37 attempts. The Huskies too warmed up a little but It was not enough to stop the Sycamores. Northern hit on 20 of 41 from the field the second half for slightly less than 50 per cent. Bob Barker received the "ugh 1 award for his defensive play in the contest which was only highlighted by his offensive efforts. After the half the Sycamores began to break up the Husky zone defense with some fine outside shooting by the entire Sycamore squad. The big job, however, was done by Dan Bush and Howard Williams who hit from all over the floor which brought out the Huskies in an effort to shut them JOB — Groundskcepers at Baltimore's Memorial Stadium turn to heavy equipment after the grid- is buried under a six-inch snowfall. The stadium is the site of today's American Football Conference SNOW iron was buried under a six-inch snowfall. The stadium is the site of today'i championship game between the Oakland Raiders and the Baltimore Colt s. Some 200 men with 50 pieces of equipment worked to clear away the snow. AP Wirephoto. Tommy Profhro Rams' New Coach off. With 14:28 remaining in the contest, the Sycamores finally grabbed the lead as Pillow hit two free throws making the score 55-54. The Huskies managed once more to gain the lead at 63-62 but it was short lived as the Sycamores came right back. The best the Huskies could do after that was come within one point and they did that on four occasions, the last being 1)5-94 with 13 seconds remaining in the game. PilloWi however hit two more free throws to ice the game and give the Sycamores a 97-94 de cision. NO. ILL M Ivey ZUlnski .... Hamel 2-3 Rohlman 1-1 Harris 7-23 UcKlurnan 7-13 perrln 0-0 Jockjjou 7-10 Janui 0-3 Scott 0-2 Turner 3-4 fnn-ffa Itm-ltu pi .. 8-20 7-U 5 5-9 1-2 3 0-0 0 0-0 0-0 3-7 0-0 1-3 1-2 0.0 1-2 Total* 40-88 14-25 22 LOS ANGELES (AP) —1 Coach Tommy Prothro of UCLA, nationally known in college football for more than 15 years, was named Saturday the head coach of the Los Angeles Rams of the National Football League. The Rams made the announcement here on behalf of their president and major owner, Dan Reeves, who was in New York, and the 50-year-old Prothro held a noon news conference to discuss the swift events of the past few days in which the contract of George Allen was not renewed at the expiration ot its five-year term. Prothro and Rams officials declined to disclose whether the former UCLA and Oregon State head coach was given a multiyear contract, nor would they reveal the amount of money involved. Allen received $40,000 annually, plus a $20,000 bonus the past several years. Allen's contract was not renewed when it expired Thursday, and Reeves informed him in a telephone call Wednesday. Reeves and alien have been at odds the past two years, a dispute that flared when Reeves tried to fire Allen after the 1969 season only to have the players threaten to quit unless Allen was allowed to remain. Reeves backed down. . but when the Rams failed to win the Western Division title this year, it was a foregone conclusion that Allen would not be back. Prothro, noted for his imaginative offensive tactics, became the ninth Rams coach since the team was moved here in 1946 from Cleveland. Asked if he had apprehensions in light of such a record of turnovers, the good-natured Prothro in his best Memphis, Tenn., southern drawl replied, "Security is something few coaches have in football but nobody thinks it will happen to them." Prothro said his reason for leaving college football was! simply that the pros offered a' new challenge. He said he weighed the decision for days before agreeing. "I knew I'd be coaching some very fine football players which the Rams have," he said. "I would be less than honest if I said money did not enter into it some, but money was not the real factor here. "The Rams present a chal- Conlinued On Page 48, Col. 3. TRIBUNE-STAR Albany Whips Eagles T. H. TRIBUNE-STAR. Sunday, Jan. 3, 1971 43 IND. ST. 87 Barker Pillow Slebenmorucn liush II. Williams Lamb J. Williams Simmon* BriMl Tuuls Ni> tllinuu, Indiana Slain Itm-ttu vl 8-11 6-7 f> 7-11 7-7 4 2-li 2-4 4-4 7-16 9-B 1-5 4-6 (Ml 2-3 ,11/70 a-4 o-o u-u 12 Gerstmeyer, Wiley Clash By MIKE RUSSELL Tribune Sports Writer The area high school basketball scene will shift back into high gear this week after a two-week lull for the Christmas holidays. The 56th annual Wabash Valley Tournament begins elimination play Monday at the Indiana and Illinois sites Just 17 schools entered this year's tourney but the com petition promises to be fierce and the games close. The tournament, hosted by West Vigo, will wind up Saturday night at the Vikings goalry. Just two county schools- West Vigo and Schulte—are entered in the Valley. In what could be the final meeting on the hardwood for Greenwood Edges Brazil s! BLOOM1NGTON, Ind.- City's Best This Week Larry Deakins, for the second week in a row, came up with the best performance as he tossed in 24 points to lead the Black Cats to an 80-69 win over Greencastle in the consolation game of tho Tiger Cubs' Holiday Tourney. Gerstmeyer will host Wiley at the ISU Arena Thursday night. feature four other county school in three contests. Wiley will be back on tlv WIC and comity trail again a they battle State High. Th game should be a fairly even one, with Wiley holding 'a sligh edge. State High's 22-day lay-of COLUMBUS, Ind.—Eleventh- .ranked New Albany handed Garfield their second loss of he day a? they defeated the Purple Eagles, 110-74, in the consolation game of the Colum)us Holiday Tournament here Saturday night. New Albany showed tremendous balance in picking up the win as they placed six men in double figures. The five starters all cracked the double-digit barrier. Virgil Casper led all scorers with 18 points, while his fellow starters added the following: Gary Me- Cooe tossed in 16, Steve Stewart chipped in 15, Mike Eurton contributed 12 points while Wilbur Hunter also had 12 markers. Dallas Cureton came off the bench for New Albany to score 13 points in a reserve. role. Phil Avery led the Eagles, now 3-7 for the year, with 16 points. Denny Akers had 10 in a losing cause. Sophomore Tom Dueling, who usually plays on the B-team, may have earned himself a starting role as he came off the bench to toss in 13 markers for the Eagles. New Albany out-rebounded the shorter Eagles by a comfortable 64-44 margin. Parseghian's Biggest Win 'Win One for Gipper' Buttons Worn By Irish Fans Bv HERSCHEI, NISSENSON DALLAS (AP>—"We are back!" So read the buttons being sported around town by Notre Dame followers during the weekend after Friday's 24-11 revenge rematch Cotton Bowl triumph over top-ranked Texas. Not that anyone rnally thought Notre Dame had benn too far away^ although the Fighting Irish haven't managed an unbeaten and untied football season since 1949. But the damaging Josses to Southern California that spoiled otherwise perfect campaigns in 1964 and again this past season, the infamous 10-10 tie with Michigan State in the national championship year of 1966 and last year's loss to Texas in the Cotton Bowl had helped fire the undercurrent that "Parseghian doesn't win the big ones." "It's a funny thing how you get a tab attached to you," Coach Ara Parseghian said Saturday. "Obviously it rankled the coaching staff and yours truly. Notre Dame won 58 games in the seven seasons I've been coach and somewhere in those 58 wins there had to be some big games. "What's the criterion of a big game? Weren't our wins over Georgia Tech and Louisiana State this season big games? Every game we play is a big one as far as we're concerned because it's a rarity when we go in as an underdog. We're expected to win no matter who we play. Everyone gets up for us. "You should see the mail that pours in before any game. When we play Pitt, we get letters from Pittsburgh saying, 'I can't live here unless you beat Pitt." " When pressed, however, Parseghian admits that beating with Jimmy Glaus T HE GREAT DEBATE NOW RAGES. Which team—Notre Dame or Nebraska—deserves the title as No. 1 in the country? Nebraska boasts throe big plus factors: (1) They are undefeated. (2) Their lone blemish was a 21-21 He with S. California; the same Trojans who beat Notre Dame, 38-28. OH They beat LSU, 17-12. in the Orange Bowl while the best Notre Dame could do was a 3-0 victory over LSU at South Bend. Call me provincial or partial—but off their performance New Year's Day, Notre Dame was the superior team. The Irish beat Texas by 13 points, 24-11, and the Longhorns' ability far transcends LSU's. No Doubt, They Were Great Teams Ironically, two of the greatest collegiate football squads ever assembled—Texas and Ohio State—bowed out with seniors in the locker rooms weeping profusely. Texas amassed 30 straight victories, going all but the final game of the third season, before losing. Texas was something special. "One of the big moments in Notre Dame's football history," said Parseghian, a sentiment echoed by Edward W. "Moose" Krause, the university's athletic director. NEW ALBANY 110 G Casper 8 Hunter 5 MuCooe 5 Stewart 6 Burton Cure-ton Douglass 2 Black i FT 2 2 6 :i u i Hutsonville Tips Sumner SUMNEB, 111. — The Hutson ville Tigers picked up their sixth win of the year as they beat the Sumner Arabs, 64-50, here Saturday night. John Tiugley led the wuiners and all scorers with 27 points in the game. Stan Miller added 15 and Alan Duncan tossed in 10 more for the winning Tigers. Dave Waldrop led the loser* with 18 points, while Waldrop added 14 imd Bi'iinelt had n runnier-, Hulic.n \illr •luniifi 8. Ciiiiup -U "'i.r~9?| wood beal Brazil, 6244, in the 44 M-MI consolation game to earn third s »-»' place in the Bloominglon Holiday Tournament here Saturday night. two city schools, Gerstmeyer and Wiley will battle Thursday nifiht for sole possession of the Western Indiana Conference and county lead. | Gerstmeyer has a 4-0 mark I in the conference, while the Hed I Green- Streaks stand 3-0. may have an undesirable effec on Frank Cliffs charges. Road Games Garfield and Gerstmeyer wil both hit the road Saturday, but will head in opposite directions. The Eagles will tangle with Highland near the cold shores of Lake Michigan, while the Black Cats will head for the Pocket City and powerful Evansville North. North will be anxiously awaiting Gerstmeyer. Last year "Sharpie High" knocked off the Huskies one night after Wiley had gone down before the Black Cats. North, with a team tabbed as better than Bob Ford and Co.'s state champions, will give the Black Cats one of their better games of the season. West Downs East, 17-13 Henry Mozee — Brlnknotlli Finley Totals 2 2 3 I 0 0 0 1 42 2t> DARRELL ROYAL ARA PARSEGHIAN "It was one of the great mo ments of my career to see Notre Dame win this game," said Frank Leahy, the legendary for vner coach, just out of a Houston lospital but a spectator none ;heless. The victory had players of 5( years ago reliving the days o Knute Rockne and the Fou Horsemen. How about George Gipp? "Who do you think knocked down a couple of those passes?" replied a Notre Dame man, with barely a trace of a smile. "Win One For The Gipper" buttons were in evidence. "I've had some exciting moments in 21 years of coaching," said Parseghian, "but in view of Texas' credentials, I'd have to say this was the biggest. We broke their 30-game winning streak, we held the nation's top rushing team more than 150 yards below their average and we held the nation's top scoring team to only one touchdown." Notre Dame did it by piling up a 21-3 lead after 16',i minutes and stopping Texas with a unique Mirrored Wishbone defense, employing rarely used Kin* Winters A very Akors Fuller Morris ...... Harris . Yowtill Andrews EAer I'ogue ...... Dueling Totals New Albany Gurilekl rr i t u o i n i a i n 3 ;( so 11 25 32 27 31 20-110 15 15 14 30— 74 man-for-man coverage with a defensive backfield setup that duplicated Texas' famed Wishbone offensive backfield alignment. In effect, it was a nine- man defense line. _ "We made it difficult for them 18 to run, although it opened some passing seams. Eventually, they Y found the weaknesses in the de-i i fense and picked at it with pass-| * es to their tight end and the! 3. swing man out of the backfield, : j both of whom we had to cover: vwith linebackers. i: "We really .didn't stray that I; far away from the basic fundamentals of our 44 or split-6 defense. We only moved two basic guys to form the Wishbone effect—an outside linebacker and Ohio State succumbed just twice in 27 regular season games and two Rose Bowl appearances. Imagine: two losses in 29 games . . . and there will be some people in Columbus, Ohio, grumbling about the Buckeyes' failure to win 'em all. Ohio State and Texas argued verbally throughout much of the season over the No. 1 rating and in the end both were denied. The Buckeyes seemingly did lose some of their desire this season. When they arrived in Pasadena, Calif., Coach Woody Hayes ordered a 10 p.m. curfew for the players. The veteran Buckeyes held a meeting, then asked the bumptious Woody to rescind the 10 p.m. curfew, making it 1 a.m. for a few nights. Hayes did—and lived to regret it. The Buckeyes did not evince enough desire to humble Stanford—an Indian team that wanted victory more. Recalls Famous Quote Texas Coach Darrell Royal summed up his feelings with a quote from Grantland Rice: "I'VE LEARNED SOMETHING THAT VICTORY CANNOT BRING, TO WIPE THE BLOOD FROM MY FACE AND SMILE SO NO ONE CAN SEE THE STING." Royal then added: "I feel miserable and I know I'll feel even more miserable." Notre Dame was in the right defense and their offense made the big plays but a third factor was paramount. Irish quarterback Joe Theismann remarked: "We wera just loose enough." Such true words. Some teams are intimidated in Texas, losing the battl* before the opening kick-off. Notre Dame did not. Theismann, who will leave Dallas today with his bride of three weeks for Honolulu to play in the Hula Bowl, desires a pro football career. He stands six feet, weighs 180 pounds, or the same size as the Kansas City Chiefs' Lenny Dawson and Fran Tarkeaton of the New York Giants. Carr Leads Notre Dame SOUTH BEND, Ind. (AIM _ Austin Carr scored 45 points to the safety. "But we also brought defensive end Walt Patulski in tighter, giving us Patulski and defensive tackles Mike Kadish and Greg Marx, three of our biggest players, inside Texas' offensive tackles. That took away tin 1 crease where Worster likes to run." Steve Worster, Uic Longhorns' All-American fullback, was held Tennessee Bypassed Tennessee, despite being fourth in both wire service polls which (gave them high rank over Notre Dame, does not figure to challenge for the No. 1 position. Beating the Air Force, 34-13, in the Sugar Bowl, will not go down in the annals as a great achievement. Psychologically, tradition enters, too, and Tennessee lost its last three bowl games prior to the win over the Air Force. Shortly, the coaches will pick their national champion for the United Press International and the sports writers likewise CuuUiut'd <)u Page 47, Col. I. OAKLAND (APi Mel Gray: Conference Wins with the double-figures us he tallied 12 points for the game. UHUENWUOi) tig liauur MuClaia Gary Nichols ____ S. ... Balky ..... StU|lhGIU> . . . Ouvis Ut'Vure. U. TuuU UUAZIL 44 'lluiui|iauu Uuubur lluaktw SuiirU Uuifljtit Iliiinl VT 2 1 4 3 a i o U n. 10 ¥ The Black Cats will depend heavily on their superior size to deal with Wiley's quickness. Friday night will see Garfield trying to pick up a winning habit when they host Vincennes. Unfortunately for tlie Ragles, the Alices are stront; a^am this year and have al ready to'iuled Wiley earlier in the season. Long Lay-Off Honey Creek will be the only other county school in action 11 Friday us they (ravel to Van lead the Notre Dame basketballjto 42 yards on 16 carries and team to a 97-73 victory oven star halfback Jim Bertclsenj Minnesota Saturday. learned eight times for a merej Notre Dame, ranked 15th in,five yards before Texas split] : of Missouri opened the game;the national major college poll,'him as a flanker . . . and that; jby scoring on a (lit yard kiekotf led 44-:!0 at halftime. 'broke up their Wishbone and: | forced them to pass more than with!Coach Dan-ell Royal would have but liked. The Vigo County School (.'or- teen games, basketball skills victm-v in Notre Dame reeU'd off nine "l feel terrible." said Hoyal.lporat i o n \\ill offer a reerea and fundamentals, as well as t West foi>i-.- s tr«iyht points and was nevcv | "but I'll live. Lady Luck smiled:tional program for filth and'handicrafts plus many other threatened again. ion us when we needed a break sixth grade buys and girls, be ;activities. Pastorini was the only quart- I'ul'i 1 ' Jonos scored '22 points during our 30-game streak.'ginning on Salurady. January Activity time is planned lor .j 1 1*1 'II j ^* .**•"» v '* *"r» *'" H *'*' *t«l\l *» I* I»WH -»«.- *•!.•» *• i *(wi»¥»lliv, llmvard Sharpes Hlack Cuts lreturn aml | ;il( ,,. t , aut , ht a | om . h .i The Gophers cut the Iris! have disposed of Stale HiKh.jdmvn ))a .ss from Sn-Ka Clara's'lead li» fi\c points. 54-4». will .o.... H-nulte Bra/.il ami Sullivan, !rj ail Pastorini Saturday to lead •!-'::::', IHt in the second half, bu Kalph Thompson led the losers iowa ™ Matluis Red Streaks; tne w ,, s , ,„ ., , 7 n •ith 14 points. Mike Patrick was V"\ e bui "l'ecl olf West Vn:o.. tm , ., (i , h sh ,.j ll( , i; ; ,.,t lie only other Hed Devil in VJ nton and ^"'f<eld in \VIC ball "aim- Boys and Girls Saturday Recreation erback in the college all-star game to complete a long pass in the strong wind, hitting the speedy Gray on a 45-yard bomb as the West took a 17-7 lead in the third period. The small college quarterback named offensive player of ilw Kuine, also kicked bit a 42 yard fieid goal, the longest in the ""'i' 1 East-West history except lor a 44-yard drop kick by Frosty Peters of Illinois in 1930. MIII U! lijindull to I! my U7> for Notre Dame, and Hob Murphy tallied the same number for Minnesota. Notre Dame is 6-2 for the season, and Minnesota is 5-4. MINNESOTA U »' li K IUII NOTKK UAMK (I f T T I'uir 20 5-5 43 II) >IU TruUiiJ Tu>lui II 111 111 Join'* 113 3 fullolt t 11 Itt.SliukiU S 1 4 5 Hi-lok II li 7 ;.' C.ummoll I U U 2 Moolluu U UK U l.ui'itftti •1 I) i 4 Edtul 2 22 5 Z J IS S 11 7 U 01 U '.- 1 J I. U HO U U I) U U t ilk- t.| T.M..U IH i. Ill I' H ::u nv. i lit II •!! iirriuay us uiey travel 10 van M,.K, ............... ;, BUITII fur Iliinr first basketball t<:if.i AUiuuii' i mu IUIUMOU KUIO "•nun oiii'K !»,>!• Ill . •'*'' ''*" '''I* 11 '!!'" <•' ,,ame Mine JJei. til : v\ t .*i taw >.• I.HM u,.ui iv-.u,um " ' i«ui» 31 u is i.i Iliuuu lli'iiok'iui lulitU i oo U till o :' :'. 41 lV'4tl That's why 1 can't feel too 9th. badly." The Purdue Assistant Being Considered TAMPA, Flu. (UPD-Purdue assistant football coach Hoy Meyer has been interviewed for the heading coaching job at the University of Tampa. School officials said the new .; I coach would be named aftei program will be open to all boys and girls residing ill Vigo County. The program will be conducted every Saturday thereafter, with tho girls ending their activities oa February 13th, and the boys concluding theirs tin Mooch tilth. The program will be held in various schools and gymnasiums und will be supervised by qualified men and women from the school corporation I>*tmr SuUinlay uulil 111 addition to \Vabasu Valley final.s. uill .il \\ri.lll k Ittlli'ili !other interviews are completed.! The programs' activities will second in the col-joe determined by the different .1 of the i ruler.-, will oiler activities such M^i",'''^"^" lege div IMOII I'titm;;-. this uasl leader;., however. i.seaMtn and lost oulv to Vender ' bill. u two-hour period from 9:3011:30 a.m. The boys may attend Crawford, Fun La net, Garfield, Gerstmeyer, Glenn, Honey Creek, Otter Creek Junior High, Pmento, Rankiu, Kiley, Sarah Scott, Thornton, North, or Woodi'ow Wilson. The girls will have reci'ea- tionul activities us well u* crafts at Kuqua, litT£lutt>y«r. or Otter Creek Junior High School children should attend the ceiitcw that is most convenient lor theui If further information nbuut the program is desired call.ilhvutv:, Ji'U> call M hoot |inuci|i#l Uuu Jennings, ^;M Kibli,

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