The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on September 25, 1930 · Page 3
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 3

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Blytheville, Arkansas
Issue Date:
Thursday, September 25, 1930
Page:
Page 3
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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, IflSO BLYTHEVILLE, (ARK.) COURIER NEWS Improved S«rvice Has Increased School Costs *- (Contlned from p*gt one) and policies of the board of education, The public has the right to be clearly informed as to the various phases of the school work. This has been th? purpose of the present series. Citizens Must Choose Summing up the situation, thru- the course of years the Blythevilie system has expended according to the demands of its citizenship. This expansion has overtaxed the revenues of the district until a crisis IIGS been reached. There are two possibilities: 1 To cffer to the children of Ulythevllle educational opportunities inferior to those opportunities ulferod at present; or 2. To produce sufficient revenue, either by taxation or other mea--' ures to operate the schools on substantially the sain.? basis. U is of vital importance that the heliosis be placed upon a basis of financial security. Uncertainty in the situation only begeis restltss- /less on the part of the pupil. Many drop out of school and olhirs d'i not do their best work. It is vllal thai, the near future see a definite solution of the problem and A that the schooK be allowed to co:i- jilnuc without interruption. It Is question of whether the community looks upon education as a matter of firu importance or of minor importance. In conclusion the writer desire: to quote ai length from a recent bulletin of the National Education Association a pertinent comment upon expenditures for public schools: "It is a practice of some critics of the schools to condemn any in- crear^ In school ' expenditures irrespective of what the cause may be, Sucli an altitude is iudefcnsi- £le. To make the point plain, let us suppose, for example that Mr. Ford and Mr. Sloan were confronted with the fact that the National bill for purchasing and operating! passenger automobiles increaswi [ some 15 fold between 1913 and 1929, | vlrinj from less than a billion in] 1913 to 12 billion in 1929, Suppose | O ut to stay out-selling like hot -ne would 5 a y lo these gentlemen: [ cakes in Oreat Britaln and now ln Ibis enormous increase is scandal- Ame rica-the pleasant, easy way to ous It H Eoing to bankrupt the get , rid of corns-a joyous, refresh- m Ion. ins fads and fnlls,of the in?i invigorating foot bath for 3 or automobile industry must be done : 4 nlghts ° alld lh ° en lltt out the corn away with. Paint all automobiles _ ro ° ts and all . black. Stop the unnecessary changes in body styles. Four brakes are an extravagance; two brakes will sjop any automobile. Tli,^ nearer an automobile approximates an school costs The nation's school bill, like Its bill-for passenger uuto- mobiles, and for many other things, has Increased since the war. This Increase has been In response to legitimate causes. "Let us recall thai during the war nearly one In every four of our young men was rejected for various physical disabilities, most, of which competent physicians state could have been prevented by tlie right kind of health education and medical care. We also remember that a fourth of those called In the draft hnd had so little schooling that for .ill practical purposes they v/ere Illiterate. Having discovered these facts, the nation resolved to remove (he deficiencies which the sross neglect of public schools in many communities had Brought about, and to realize the solid returns which come from Investing in efficient public schools. ! illftier Cost Inevitable j " It has cost more money to be sure. Ii has cost more money first, .because many more children are at! tending school. The increase In •.chool attendance ulune Justifies a doubling of public school costs over the pre-war level. Second, it has cost more money because the dollar now has but 59 percent, of its 1913 purchasing power. Consequently, It lakes more dollars tn provide a given amount of schooling, Just as it takes more money to buy a pound of meat or a suit of clothes.- These two legitimate ano inescapable causes, larger attendance and loss in purchasing power of the dollar, alone account for most of the Increase in school costs aver the pre-war level. "These considerations are pertin- ent to a study of Iho dnta of this bulletl)), The United Stales is a growing nation. TiiH fact, as well as the additional consideration that public Interest makes necessary a reallotment of Income from time o time, will result in changes in the percent of Income Invested for particular purpose. As these changes oecur they need to be appraised in the light of the criteria which have been stated above. The mere fact that the percent of In-, come expended for :.chcols. for au-' tomoblles, for insurance or'for any other purposes has changed, means nothing In itself. The question Is,, Is the increase justified? Does it nd-i vance the welfare of the iieople of : the United States?" PAGE THKE*. HIS EVES UOT TIRKI) ST. PAUL, Minn. 1 ..'' (UP)—"Keep your eye on this buggy 'or a low minutes," said a comely visitor to a local merchant, Vor a week the ^nerchant, J. O. Buske kept firs'. We eye and then ills'oilier on tlu> vehicle but the young woman didn't, re'turjj. However, another womni j appeared and explained her friend 1 had left town and asked her tc get t)i<5 buggy, but she had fovgol- ten. Buske thanked her kindly a 1 she took the buggy a\vay and lie. wns able to-remove his weary cyi;. from • it. H EADCOLDS Mtlt in txxllac water wd inlul* alto tauff up BOM. OVIBff MIUION JABS U5EP YtAMY NOW BLYTHEVILLE HAS A STORE ANY GITY COULD BE PROUD OF ACORNS Gone In 4 Days Roots and All Callouses Too They call this miracle wcrker Radox and since it has been working wonders with the bad feet of the tight little Isles—plas- engine and four wheels better. Fire J^Ut ^Id^g't \ lle your research, men and your high salaried executives and get down to ,., t '' B es.entUis." What would Mr. Ford ^ h pared 'With 23.000,000 today. They would tell us that steel and other basic industries depend upon the automotive industry for their prosperity. They would expand upon how essential the automobile Is in modern life, both in business and recreation. As for the fads and frills, the body style changes, and ail the rest, they would contend that these are but' steps toward progress in automobile design. They would make no apology for the fact that for every dollar they took from the pocket of the American people in 1913, they now take fifteen dollars. They would .conclude by telling of their plans for making the American people spend still more for automobiles in the future. ;"And so let us conclude that a uiere increase in the amount spent for a national service is not to be condemned in itself. The impor- tanca of the enterprise needs to be considered, the amount of service furnished needs to be known, and the causes of the increase have to be studied. "The.y; same principles apply to What A Woman Should Weigh 45 M9 Tteware of Fat from heels and toes and to put your feet in go:d vigorous condition so that you and pleasure. ' -Jusb'flsfc for a box of Radox a' Kirby Drug Co.. .or any mcderi drugstore—you'll be delighted.. Adv. 14 Style - - Quality - - Price--- The season's smartest slices. 1'umps-, Straps and Th-s in J'aupe Brown, Black Satin, Kill, Itciilile trim. High .ind l.avf Hwls. Widths AAA <r> C. Also SI-EN-TIFF1CK Arcli Support Shoes, $5 and $6 THE NEW Economy Shoppe Across the Street' From Home Theater. As women grow older they are apt to take on weight—best to watch out and keep from growing fat—weigh yourself today and see If your weight and height compare vrith figures below—If so you are lucky—your figure Is Ideally perfect and you can feel happy. Ages -15 to 49 4 Ft. 11 In. 5 Ft. 0 In, 5 Ft. 1 In. 6 rt. 2 In. 5 Ft. 5 Ft. 5 Ft. 129 Pounds 131 133 136 13S 142 146 151 155 159 163 3 In. 4 In. 5 In. 5 Ft. 6 In. 6 Ft. 7 In. 5 Ft. 8 In. 5 Ft. 9 In. Weights given include ordinary indoor clothing. If you are overweight cut out pies, pastries, cakes and candy for 4 weeks—then weigh yourself—go light on potatoes, rice, butter, cream and sugar—eat lean meat- chicken, fish, salads, green vegetables and fruit. Take one half teaspoon of Kruschen Salts in a glass of hot water every morning before breakfast—This Is the easy, safe and sensible way to talce cff fat—an 85 cent bottle, ot Kruschen Salts lasts 4 weeks—get It at Kirby Drug Stores or any drug store in the world. You'll be gloriously alive—vigorous and vivacious In 4 weeks. Adv. 3 Black Suede Pump, Grey Lizard Collar. New Spike hoel S1Q. Same Style, plain collar. Also Black Suede, 1 Strap, Jr. Span lieel. Brown French Kid, Lizard trim. Sama Style, Black Kid. Center Buckle. 810, (Other Styles §6 to §7.85) HOSIRKY TO HARMONIZE Gordon—McCalltim. THE NEW MEAD CLOTHING COMPANY'S NEW STORE ; // Qpens Tomorrow Evening At 7 O'clock Everybody Is'Invited to the Pormal Opening Music By Jimmy Boyd and His Lucky Devils For eighteen years, the Mead Clothing-Company has served this community. And each passing year has shown us ways to improve that service—to do a better job—until today we believe more men depend on this store for good clothes, correct stylos and sound values than, any other in this section. r Tomorrow we're climaxing those 18 years of service by giving to Blytheville a store any city could be proud of. We're climaxing those years of style leadership by offering Hart Schaffner & Marx smart new styles, Stetson and Knox hats, Manhattan Shirts, and J. P. Smith shoes; the most stylish merchandise in America today. We're climaxing our value giving efforts, too. New lower prices and better quality for less money enable us to give you more for your money than ever before. . .' Drop in and look around. You'll be proud of this new store and the smart things it has to offer. THE NEW MEAD CLOTHING GO. Good Shoes and Hosiery

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