The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on September 24, 1930 · Page 4
Get access to this page with a Free Trial
Click to view larger version
September 24, 1930

The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 4

Publication:
Location:
Blytheville, Arkansas
Issue Date:
Wednesday, September 24, 1930
Page:
Page 4
Cancel
Start Free Trial

Page 4 article text (OCR)

IM4BTFOUB BLYTHRVILLE. (AHIO COURIER NEWS BLYTHEViLLB COURIEIl NEWS .'£• THE COURIER.NEWS CO., PUBLISHERS ;" ' . C. B. BABCOCK, Editor •"-.•• .*" H, W, HAINES, Advertising Manager " sole National Advertising Representatives: "•" T)ie Thoou* P. Clark Co. Inc., New York, H'. PJittMlelphl*,."Atlanta, .Dallas, San AntoiUo, 6au "• ftttciico, Chicago. St. Louis. ,!"'. Published Ewr'y Aiternoon Except Sunday. "~' BnleMd ; as"Kcond class matter at Hie post !^f: oSiee : at Blytlievllle, Arkansas, under net of '-- Congress October 9, 2917. Served by the United Press 6UBSCKIWION RATES By carrier in the city of Blylhevllle, 15c per week or $0.50 per year In advance. By mall within a radius ot 50 miles, $3.CO per year, tl.M for six months, B5o lor throe mcmttis; by mail in postal zones two to sis, Inclusive, *6.50 per year, in zones seven and eight, $10.00 per year, payable In advance. :r The Stabilization -~ Corporation's Cotton «- It lias been UK custom in cerlain 7- circles to attempt to explain the wcak- "-" ness of the colton market on gnnnuls of ~ fear that the KOvenimetil would dump «•"- oil the market something over a mil•— lion bales acquired in last- spring's futile "-- attempt to bolster the price level. ^ Carl Williams stated at Memphis £T,' that the f;mn board would not oll'ev ;.-;; this cotton for sale on an "unwilling : ~ market", but the gentlemen wlio wnnt :" the farm board and Hie co-opLM-alivcs •*r blamed for cheap cotton professed an ""- inability to uiiderstund what Mr. \Vil!'.!" liams meant. We seriously douTit if anyone ever really bslievcd the government would : g. sell its cotton for less than,it paid for ;:tv it. Such a procedure would not only be '^ expensive but it would be extremely ;;."; poor i»litics. Fortunately howsvcr, E. F. Crcckniore, president of tbc Cot Ion " ; Stabilization Coriwrntion, whicli liolds "' the farm board cotton, has now eom- ." pietely cleared up the .matter with a ' definite statement that the corporation's holdings, about 1,300,000 bales, will be maintained "throughout the present col- ton season unless tho price in the meantime advances to or above the purchase ; ••'• price." The theory under which tho. stabilixa- . '?. tion corjjjjjg^jpjg^jysg'i'eatablislicil calls 'J.' for the taking off the market of the *" surplus in years of heavy production to *,',!. prevent undue price depression. The ~; cotton, of course, docs not disappear. "- It must be sold, and if the plan is to •- work out successfully there must be v- short crop years to balance the surplus .— years. The crop this year was rc- ,'~ duced a little, but because of curtailed ^~. consumption, resulting from unsettled *~ busiiv?s^ conditions, no reduction of the ^;, surplus is in sight. It is a proposition ^ that is up to the cotton growers. The ;„'- government will hold its cotton off the ;— market this season, but what will b« *•• done nsxt season will depend in, a large «.- measure upon the degree to which i". acreage is reduced next year. There ',~. will be no point to any effort to hold !£ surpluses off the market if growers "~ persist in producing new surpluses each «:• year. The County I Ionic Since It war- pnlnlni the Mississippi County Horn;; en South Urondway is 0:10 of the. innsl attractive apjicarlni; lmlli!m : ;s I" tlic city. The buildlni;. formerly vnti as a coiirtlious!, Is Imposing In appearance- ami loata more like ft prosperous hole) than it d^es n home for tlie poor. Only a lew clays ai;o a tourist cliovc up In front of Die home and (iitercd the buildin:;. On being njkod wh: he w.is looking for lie answerer! I am loal-.Ing fur <i place to spi-nd the night. Isn't ibis u haul? Mrs. Welilj told him Mini instead ol lieliiB u liulfl it was Hie home provided by tiu- cousUy l-'r the poor people who were unable Id provide for themselves. The tourist replied Hint it v.as the most atlrnctlvc appearing building he had men In town and ll)al It had the appearance of u hotel. The mistake of this tourist was one that would be readily made by any stranger. The grounds surru'.nuimj; Hie home are beautifully improved. Trce.v shrubs ami flowers arc tastefully placed, tin' lawn is ki'ul nicely mewed, rustic scuta arc convciili'iHly placed, potted pluuts ndoru Hie windows und teds of llowcrs lire growing bcr.ealh (lie l:irt;c windows. This transformation of 'lie of the bleakest nnd most desolate upiteailnr; old buildings in Hie city has been brotmiU uUaW with but little expense by Mr.s. Artlnir L. Webb, superintendent In charge, who has devoted her entire lime to the beautifying cC the buihlinr! and giounds nnd looking- niter the welfare of the poor unfortunates who have no homes of their own. The interior of the building Is as attractive as Hie outside. The rooms are all scrupulously clean, the walls and fl-ors are as clean as the average home nud throughout the building there is Die "homey" atmosphere that adds so much to the comfort nnd pleasure of the destitute men nnd women who arc tlcsllned to spend their last, days in the home, We aic enthused over Hie County Home, U is n real place that can be called one of Osceola's show places. Visitors are Impressed with the idea thai Mississippi comity, the bluest and richest cciinly in nil Arkansas, lias a heart filled with pity and compassion for those of its people forced to accept charily. The operation of the Ccunly- Home is not expensive when one considers the number of people Ilia', are fed. clolhccl nnd housed within Us walls. The cost of supporting the county's poor, per Individual, is less than is paid for the support- of criminals. The paupers arc surely more deserving. If you haven't fccn the county home drive down Broadway tlie next lime you are in town. An agreeable surprise awaits you. —Osceola Times I SIDE GLANCES By George Clark THE WINDMILL I have been in this town about fifteen years und I am already beginning to urcspcr teyinid all expectations. There's really no telling as to v.hat 1 may yet amount to. I dread to think of it. Besides many other things, I have an interest, in the barber shop here, now! 1 paid the owner forty-cents for a shear in it this morn- ins. Bui, oven now,* life 'to me is Just, a long empty dream—or rather a nightmare—because I have been disappointed so many, many times in this wonderful thing called "love". However, I ha\c not lost all courage and hope. I always keep in mhul the old saying, "If at first you don't succeed, sigh, sijih again." CUBA M, 11IGDON. WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER-24; jggO to be ol.definite importance In the maintenance of human health, engineers of the stale anil city health departments have giver, eater consideration to the elhn- lou from the atmosphere of ic interfering particles, "They siiy (hty liked my screen lost and want Is star me in an underwork! rtk'ture as so<m as my present contract pvnircK '' expires. WASHINGTON LETTER KY RODNEY DUTCIIER NEA Servitu Writer WASHINGTON—Everyone seetrjB .0 ngrec that good roads- arc a Unc tiling to have and probably there isn't a county in tlic wnrlrt uninterested in extending and/improving its highways. So there will be at leait CO countries represented at, the Sixth International Road Congress beginning here en Oct. e, perhaps the most widely representative inter-! (ll e honorary committee for th national convention ever held. ; affair includes prominent membe Intensive development of high- ! Con 3 r «' a »d f Mais and th wuvs and the enormous increase of «:rclary-gcncral of the congress i mo'toring in the United States;, as ". om «s «• Mac-Donald. chief..of th dr^ain of the happy day when the people of oilier nalions will owi automobiles in somewhere near lln same proportion as Americans Last year we sold "1000,000 automo biles abroad nnd tlie mom foreigi highways expand the more we wil tell. The U. S- government- Is putting itself out. The State Departmen ri?nt the invitations, Presiden Hoover is likely to make a speech Five men In Paris who wrote a contract on a table cloth went to court ever a dispute. They should Im'e known an agreement like tliat would have to be changed—eventually. Tlic founding of a school of geography at. Harvard supplies a long-felt want. It will, at least, enable students to write home that they have covered considerable ground. i-. OUT OUR WAY By Williams WAUV< UP Qurre A CLOSER VJORRv-/ WART! VOUR well as ..the-ilinmcnio pobsibilitles for "sale of American cars abroad, already have le-d to morn advance interest-In the congress than is orj dinavily attracted by international assemblies of a non-political m- (lire. Big countries and Illllc countries :iave delegates en the way—the list acludcs Algeria, Sudan. Dormurtajf French West Africa, Hongkong^ Indo-Cliiiin, New Caledonia. New South Wales. Nigeria, Ihc Republic of Libau, Tunisia, Portuguese East Africa nnd Queensland. ] object is lo spread informal ticn absut highways, their construe'' tton and' maintcnnncc. Foreign highway officials, engineers nml road builders, reaii-iin'B liow lar ahead the United States is i:i dc- vclO|in:ont of modern, roads, presumably are eager to sec and hear for themselves just how the American system has been and is ban!, bulll up. Car Sinkers Interested The fad that Ihc president ol ic National Automobile Chambei Commerce, Roy D. Chapin. i: cad of the American organir.inj oimnission which had charge cutting the congress over indicate. lie inleresl which the nnlomobili Kiustry is takini; in Ihe show. Wr iavc more lhan ihrec-fourllis he world's meter cars nnd consirt rable less than one-tenth its pomi alien, a fact whicli leads some o automobile manufacturers I JOHN MAItSIIAU/S II1KTH On September 'U, 1755, John nreliall the most famous of Am- rican jurists, and for 34 years ir-renie court, was born In Pau- uir county, Virginia. He attended an academy in West- lorcland county and studied law ntll the outbreak of the Ifcvcln- on, when he entered the army as volunteer. He served in most of le major balUcs and by (he. time e readied 22 be was already a aptaln. The war over, he returned o his home town to practice law. le soon rose to 11:.? head of the irginia bar. He was a member of tlie Virginia ta!c legislature and of the stale cnventicn that adopted the Constl- ution. In 1108, a year aflrjr he ad been sent to France as an cn- oy to,help remove tlie restrictions aid oh American commerce, he was lectcd to Congress. Two years dtcr he wiis invited by President \clamr to become his secretary of var, but declined. He accepted, lowever, tlie position of secretary f state, which he held for a shcrl line. In laoi -ho was commissioned hief justice of the supreme court. His accession to. the bench marks lot, only a turning point in his lif-; nit also in the legal and constilu- ional history of tlie United States. Marshall's decisions on constitu- icual questions established preoc- lents In the interpretation of tlw Constitution that have been accept:d ever since. . WHEN A HAfZO GROWTH COVfiQSTHE TIP OF THE 6ILL ENABLES THE CHICK. TO PECK ~THRGUS'.-( _; ' SHELL. >F spurn OAKOTA. The Editor's Letter Box cderol Bureau cf Public Roads. "Discussions at the" coiiferenc ill be divided along two mai nes: construction nnd mnintcn ncc and traffic and admlnistra ion. Uncler ti« first category K considered tlie various types o mvcnient and their uses, construe ion of new roads in various kinri if territory antt the like. Unde raffic and ndministralioii will 'I onsidercd traffic regulation, higl vay financing, correlation and ca- rdinatiou of highway transport ami similar subjects. Plan Many Tours There will be short tours for. the lelegales in and near the District of Columbia nnd after tin sessions :hey will be given their choice of ;hree instructive motor lours, to New England, to Florida or through the middle west as far ' ns Des Monies. Advance publicity from the organizing commission includes the fact that the chief of the Department of ways at Bangkok in Siam is named Luang Prinyayogavibulya, who will doubtless be intrcduccd to other delegates us something else. Mr. Prinyayogavibulya lias reported that instead of sloping its roads off from the center to they will shed water, Siam builds th?m 'with the edges eight inches higher than tlie cen'.er. which under Siamese torrential rains teeps the rainfall in the roads and rcndeis them more compact. Blythevillc Schculs To tbc editor:) From the Memphis Press-Scimitar, September • 23 was noticed a copy for the Blylhe- ville, Mississippi county, Ark., city's public school that citizens of same above mentioned, who have not sufficient means to purchase, textbooks will be provided for through the county drouth committee. That makes us think of oM days citizenship, although It's very noticeable, rating so wide publicity and notoriety for the city's 'public school. Fine indeed, though. -It seems, as tlio purge-of-.the city mass meeting has- iakcn some effect. Only hope (hat.-it will con- tim;e until means are found or raised to secure a full term school for 1030 term. Wonder if it can't be done if (lie gates are opened so it will come home? James T. Brackin, Biythevillc. Ark. Sweden to Remember Greta Garbo's Birthday STOCKHOLM. <UP) — Greta Garlic, iiie leading Swedish film star, will be 25 years old about the middle of September this year, her friends here have recalled, and a Swedish film publication has started to collect money from Us readers for a birthday gift. Whether such £ present will be welcome or not. the editors seem not to have stopped to consider. In Sweden tlie celebration of of. four decayed mules hi made a vow never to take a drink of water. The vow has been faithfully kept 'or nearly three quarters oi a century. birthdays i5 more pnbUc liian in the United States. Women's birthdays are usually ignored, except in the case of celebrities, like Selma Lagc-rlocf. but when prominent men lurn 50 or GO. the newspapers publish their pictures and cgraiihical sketches. " bi- WATERTOWN, Wis. WP)— Henry BassiiiBer, 100, the city's oldest resident, lias passed tiie C7th year that lie has refrained from drinking wai,2r. Durin!; the Civil War Batiinger was commissioned to get some walcr and when he found tlic stream polluiert by the bodies CLASSIFIED" ul Smoke Cheats City Folk of Sun's Health Giving Rays I'.y mi. MOKIIIS 1'isiiw.iN' • ijlilcr, Juunul uf the Amrrir.in uliral Association, ami nf lly- Kria. Ihr. llraUh Magazine iivcsligattons made in various ;e cilics since tho ticvflopm.-".' o! Hie ro.ilization that litllc btm- liulil actually comes through the siiK.ke clouds, have revealed the fact lha; city dwellers cannot de-, penrt on the sun for nliravblc: rays. S;;;uirs made by the department of physics of the Univcivity of Chicago and the health department of the city of Chicago Miuu' years ago Indicated that suf- lirinit sunlight to be of value cemrs through liitr smoke of Clii- r.'.eo only for two hours a day n; three montlK". of tlic year. Till 1 contamination of the al- ir.cfpV.crc by smoke from ll«p chimneys of private houses, oflux buildings, industrial plants, e.ncl s is a r-^riaus matter in srv- cr.il n tbp large- cities of . Uuiicil Stales. Ihc presence of particles ;cu; and ash and of the va[ ot yirious acids produces injury to trees mid plains and is a den" imc detriment to health. In ECC t:o:i= cf Chicago, New York. I'itli. . burgli unrt other large cities it I I impossible to cause an cvcrgrcci tree lo grow. A part of the injury to health i due to the loss of daylight or ultra violet rays. Some of the injury t health must b« due to the Inhala on of the particles [hat have been mentioned. Kcptcsenlatives of tlic Unite:! itiitcs Public Health Service have ecenlly made available the resull f a .simultaneous record of clay- ight made in New York on the oof of the- United Sl.dcs .Marine lospilal at the lower end of Man- .altan Island where the air was imisually smoky nnd on the roai >f the United Slates Quarantine lospital oil Hoffman Island. Him.- es south of Manliattan Island, vliere the ajr was comparatively Jear. Tlie resiilt-i ot the study of the oss cl dayllcht mc-nsured by pho- cclcclric cell indicate that the average daily loss at tile lower end of Manhattan Island was at least >0 per cent on tome days. The nv- crayc ixMcentugr loss pf tlie whole year was IG.G for clear days. 34.G for cloudy days, nnd 21.b for all days. The loss of light depends among oilier things, on tlic alli- uide of tlie sun ar.tl on the nature o£ Hie daylight available. t!'.at h t osiy wiietlicr from clear or to say whether from clear or presence or absence of strong wind The percentage loss of Ugh', was found to decrease ns the velocily of the wind increased. Apparently strong wind is able to move the smoke particles in the atmospheric contamination out of the ranje of interference. Since sunlight has been shown • \ Play a new role You can't be yourself many years at a stretch, without being somebody new! All at once, you will be using different cosmetics, eating different foods, setting your table differently, rearranging your surroundings, readjusting your whole scheme of life. Advertisements lead you to do this—even when you are least aware. They announce the new discoveries. Others try them. You try them. Of a sudden, you've changed! The old is at once too out-of-date. It is too slow in this age of speed. Too ineffective in this age of perfection. Somewhere, in advertisements you have not read yet, are things other people are reading about that will make a change in you. Read the advertisements here today. You will discover some of the things you will want to use habitually. You might even get ahead and start using some today. 'Adocrliscments cnlir/hienyou about the new.,. and enlighten your life with their news

Get full access with a Free Trial

Start Free Trial

What members have found on this page