The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on January 15, 1931 · Page 4
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 4

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Blytheville, Arkansas
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Thursday, January 15, 1931
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? ?AGE BLYTIIRVIl,I,E. (ARK.) COURIER NEWS THURSDAY, JANUARY Ifi. 1931 THE BLYTHEVILLE COU1UER NEWS : t-HS COUHIEK NEWS CO., PUBLISHERS < 'd R. BABCOCK. Editor , . U. \Y. HA1NE8, Advertising Manager Polo National Advertising Representatives: The Thomas P. Clark Cw. Inc., New York, Philadelphia, Atlanta, Dallas, San Autorlio, San Francisco, CWcaijo, St. Louis. Published Every Afternoon Except Qunday. Entered as second class matter at Ihe post oUice at IJIytheville, Arkansas, under act ol Congress October 9, 1917. Served by the United Press SUBSCRIPTION KATES By carrier In the city crt Blytheville, Ibo per week or f6.50 per year In' advance. By mail within R radius ot 51 mUes, $3.00 per ycur, SI,50 for 6lx months, 65c (or three months: oy mail In postal zones Cwo to Elx, Inclusive. 53.50 per year, In zones seven »ii eight, $10.00 per year, payable In edTi No Help for the Unemployed About t'lie only way to relieve un.m- ployment is to put men en the payroll. That being the cas - we v/ould not bo surprised if Governor Parncll wer: (liiite right in pi-otoKting that he has done everything lie can (o help the situation in Arkansas. Nothing lins been (lo::; by the stale .government to relieve condition:, in this state, and nothing can be done, because, the govcrmcnt of Arkansas luii come dangerously near to exhausting its financial resources. We arc in ;'. situation, as the recent reports of the governor and the highway commis- i sioner reveal, wher; we cannot go on i. without i£c!!ing more bonds, and we | have already sold bonds to a paint '/ where it is not going to be easy to sell : more bonds or to find the revenues to . • retire those already outstanding. ! If any private business got into a similar condition it would be hciiilcil for bankruptcy, and that ought- to be u warning to every re-idoiit and Inx- payn- of Arkansas to wake up to what ' is going on in Little Rock. Nathan Straus '' There are two ways of judging a rich man. One is to assay the manner . in which lie got his wealth; another is to judge the. manner in which he disposed of it. Probably it is the latter ..JlietlKij^ tkj}(_.iri\;cs u^-'lhc Ims^. intliea- . ' : fibr, cf.VinaivVcharacter; and Ific late' -.Nathan-Straus passes the test with flying colors.' No one knows just how many young ni£n and women are alive and in good health today who would have died in infancy if it had not been for Mr. Straus. The number must be well up in the thousands. His distribution of milk to the poor children' of Now York . while not as spectacular as some charities, was assuredly one of the most useful bits of kindness ever undertaken by any man. The man needs no epitaph and no eulogy. The more statement of what hp did is enough. He saved many, many children from dying, or from life-long ill-health. Isn't that about MS fine r. statement as anyone could wish for 1 his gravestone? Whal A Lynching Docs It ought to 'DC pointed one thai nvi-. peopie who arc pi'oU-.-Ming iiguiii.it i.u- i-cccnl lynching at Maiyville, Mo., an.: not moved by any misplaced sympathy for Ihe victim of llml in.uragu. Ali<-i' all, a man who In-ats a girl to death does not de-serve a great deal df consideration, ami ii' tills imiriL-s'Cir's iL:;l;i was horrible, wi was the death of hi; victim. Whal cause:, indignation at the :il'- fair is the uici that ii is a biu'.v again-l all society, Tlie ViOOO im-n who v/ei'e n: the mob that UUT.I'I! that N.'gru aiivu will be \V')::-i' men, for the re.it of their .lives, tluui they were before. You «:::not give fru; vi-nl to cr.ielly and bloo;!- lust without i!nm;;::ii:K yinn- -••.•!; j!c boil;;?. The main joii m civili/ation, al'ier ail. is to lift mankind mil o!' savagi-ry— in Tennyson's wml.- 1 .. to "move upward, workinj; mil iho !.i-asl." A'crii.se Uicu ihis at Muryville :>.'l:; '.!:<-• whol. process bad:. SIDE GMNGES By George Clark - i i Words of Sound Ted! No hijher piv:>; w.'.t.'. '• n>:.s;:;ne viilch &o:vr::'r I the Arkur.fns Icii'Sr'.uif v. ll.iit it wa.i ntlcciual 1:-. :!.- l.i»: :i'-i:l ]:1" •'. This Gcncrc.l Asum.'iiy !:;...:> n:u:er tondl'.io v: thnt, (or the stnte ns r. v,-h-j!e. ;.rc more diili- cult than nny Ar):nns» has known slnca the Civil wnr period. In Hi: r.cvrmor'i word?, I'm- cxiraoidliiai-y ocoi'.uinli; tl'.ualicn and ths ^cu-v/ drouth have broiisiit &ur:i'rl:i^ to some of ou: people mul dlfllcultlas to u'.l ot us. ami I; :'; cn'iy r.fiturnl thnt B dciiiand ch-jnlcl arise !o.- legislative rcnicdie.? lor cccr.urr.ic Ills. EM', he warns iisnlns'. p:rmlltiiig irji-:clvi\i to Ijo r.<r:~:- \: dcd by our : yi;ip:Uhtcs inio s'.-Jr.piin? iiolii-lL.; which arc uuiicv.r.J, or speiidir.t: :;'.alc fund;-, lor thlnrs which. In Ecrvko to the p:i:;>l:, \vou!u no: bo worth wl:at they would cost. Both the legislature nr.d ths people ;ivo reminded uy the chief •Kcculive that "the cause of our distress U economic, mil legislative." And the remedy lies "in cccnornlc recovery, not legislative palliation." No sounder statement cnuM be made than that legislation can lirst serve by directing Ihe use of public funds loi' sound, productive purporcb. Thin is no ti:;::. Qovr.:i:v Pnrn:! 1 . suyy truly nnd wisf-!y: "to try out fantnstlc scUeiv.es nor vhionary panaceas for all our ills. It is no (iir.e to increase in any material decree tlic tax burdoni on .our people. It is no tlinn tc venture into and others sluggish. A dynamic Individual drives himself to the point or exhaustion In an cHorl to accomplish his end. He reaches r. .state of exhaustion without reilrj- . Ins hat he is tired. ; The sluggish Individual works on slowly and carefully and seems to I tc tired all the lime. In r.u effort I to establish the typa, ens imy measure the basal metabolism, the ! vital capacity and study other phy- j fiolcgic reaclom. Most important. however, ts a study of the habit? c' • the Individual' In order to -.liter-1 ; mine his output, of energy during I ! an ordinary working day. BE SURE YOU'RE RiGHT— f "I could have made a grand slam if I'd hud enough nerve to bid .six diamonds." 1 THE FIRST LOCOMOTIVE i Cn Jan. 15. 1331. tr? first Icco- j 1.10 Ive built in America, appeared on the Baltimore •& Ohio railroad. H was called ihe "Best [ Friend." Designed by Adam Hall , it was built at (he Wc.n Point foundry in N PW yn-l: City. | The "B:st'Friend" had a vcr-' , "-"! mbiilai toiler carried atone' er.tl. of the horizontal platlorm O v fiame. wi)iie :he cylinders woie , carried at the other end. The four ] i wheels occupied the vy.-. between i I th" tTllcr nnrl the cylinders | i The West Point foundry built a I I second loc:motivc. the "Ce Witt! | Cii;:t:n," in 1831. which was put at I work em tl-,? Mohawk i: Hudson- railroad, now part of the New York I Central &. Hudson railrcad. [ This second engine was very sim-i iliir in design to trie first, but, of; course, possessed a number of im-l_ MILING is OFTEN CONSIDERED B SlCfN OF IHfELUGENCE IN , BUf SC1EN- E RECEKfLY BH8IES HRfc- KO MOUE 11^-rtu.ieEwr 1SCT SOIEMN ONHS. proverronts. 1 WASHINGTON LETTER- History of Old Iowa MOUNT PLEASANT. la.. be made secretary cf the treasury I'.nri perhaps really control the J. White House and that anything of | Rnr.kob njaln will find himrelf a the kind wculd te pretty awful. A issue in '1U32. The Reput- ri,?at deal will be heard about the ib "plot" to seize the gcvcrn- I>T;TCHER NEA Servlcr Writer WASHINGTON — Mr. John the most of him. Schotwer ' 0 i r rv "i^vjiii i-ijr/ttoii^ i. ia.. iui'f- oaves il> nijeons The history of Iowa Wesleynn Coli lc "e. oldest higher education in-' BOSTON, (UP) — The fishing, :tiuitlon ''Vest of Ihe Mississippi.' .rchooncr L. A. Dunton came to has fceetl reviewed by Ihe Painnp- p::t wllh th-j story of how 15 pig-'" 05 "' masnalne published by the C3iis had been saved from almcsl ct[lt = historical society, certain death by being Mown onto Aincnj the notes the article (h? craft while It was some 300 ir -Ji'.ioiK tiia; James Harlan. form- the ug'2nt received :i cjusignment i n • °' Wr ' nkets an(1 fool! from ttlc IS Revived Washington Indian bureau fc,r dl;- tribuiicii i>.mo:ig Indigent members of the Seminole tribe miies at sea. ] cr Sici^tary of the Interior, and The birds we 1 ,? being swept sea- llis sister, the wif? of Ribert T. wn-'l by a terrific wind when they, Lincoln, were both graduated at landed I Ihe Democratic national chairmen On the other hand, Raskob's I were unlikely to prove as big a lia- friends will depict him as a lie ; '.i!:'.y to his party as he has ueri soul, full of altruism and devotion • -" ->r ,-t Cr anywhere near it, u"- to the public good Although he is u j for tte: i the the Dunt on's : the crew made deck. Iolva Wcs':>y home ! -cr.s Kas!:ot makes himself a ulug>'i '. ."i"; '.iK'.n he nov; is. Ki'iirou is the pigeons refused an offer of j -... iiterty. The fishermen said the; £?„ „ r J' o . . _ * , | Pnf iTsnmnc XOQF^^ birds would be allowed to remain iiiusalla cLdivC aboard as long as they wished. j J a State of Oklahoma (UP) — P=o:OLD SCOTCH FOUND ' LUZEHNE. N. Y. <UP)— A batth ! large now enlerpi ir.es ii-.v sinfc's dcbl." •' ln^ .Incrqa^rs in uiOr' -'-Arkiipsa? Gazctit;. As fleet an a rumrunner may be. opines l office sage, he usually has someone close lib heels. As (he word corpulent was heard used in a sentence at the police stalon llu- ollKr djy: "Who is that corpulent five bucks to the other day?" Tiie The (act thnt wheat consumption has t r '' a; i>' declined in America leads Cynicat £;:die to o 1 :- srrve that conditions have uoue a-.;ainst the grain. The fcliow wlio leads the coilfgc yells. the cflice sa^c, would do well to observe Cmislnus card sentiment: "Good ch:u Ihro otit the year." the A woman in Illinois is reported to h:,\e cut up S5000 and sewed the pieces on a crazy quilt. There's one woman, at least, uho lud no difficulty making both ends mec:. OUT OUR WAY n DV lllVlS an ex-Republican who tool; the Democratic chairmanship through ..-.. iv. ,,. U v, io n.t- Parly's hies' devotion to his fricn'd Al Smith. b:r susar daddy, It is Im who has they will assert timt he Is mw al°f Scotch w.-usky wrapped in yel-, Iri'ii im'.llui! up nearly all the sp'aidid type of Democrat of whom lcw - ;i P 3 P^ r w »s found between ihe: roud. second floor and the ceiling cf the' iv ^^ ^ __ tfc.at p i;l Hock-.vell Houro annex v.-hcn th"'vcar-avon"«li'imi'tyi'oreaniz«tl"ii I" Of course there is anuther-pos- iU-was torn down recently. W. cii has' •func'tioncdi-so well jn.sible e.\plaiinl:c:i of Rnsk^b.. .No i l^oslelry was built, in 1832. h'r.u~Misr:iv.; away at the adminis- i rnillinnnirc business'inim witli Ras-, Irr.ticn and in ' wiigiils the con-! kob's record of success v;oulcl r.:lish i ;,-"-:.;^r.a! cnnipalgu -lafit, fall. He . the Uc;i:ocr.itic defeat of 1023. iioth created and financed lhal or-1 The rjcrconal attacks for which Ean:,'.'Hion. Only $15,000 in con-; Flasko!} came in, partly because he u-ibiilicns tj tlie party were re--was a Catlnlic. might hnve caused ;:OL.:d for 1930, whereas the TC-J lii« !o quit in disgust aJIflr the ccipi;; wno SC19.000. • •'"":[ cr.mpaisn. And they might have The i.artv no'.v owes $028.000. of imbued him—perliaps did—with a \v!\f!i ^'''.Vrco is due l!v. Rashob Drim dcternilnBllon to fight on to ami s"..'iiCO ta the Counly Trust a Deinccratlc victory, if only lor C'iMi-;-.i:iy ot New York in which the intense personal satisfaction of !M-_l:c!) and Alfj-cd E. Smith are a big hard, rb done well. [ hcnvilv interested. Raikob artvanc- I>av,» =pcnt millions lor more friv- i.:;! S1JO.COO in 1M9 mid also con-' oious anri ujele.ss purposes than I uibul.'u S20.CDO directly to con-: (he success of the Dnnccralic par! 2iv-.-:.-.nal c.iiupafsns. ' ty. \Vo'.l, s'G'.i S02 I'.ow imponanf But RasKo'o's position' can become R;rk-l] l:ns hien lo Hie Dnmc.'.its. nnicii nrrc delicate than it is. Al- \Vhil? picviciir-B it with new b!i:cws ready ihcrc ar,3 fears and prc:!ic- 01 «.ir he has also en", down Its t i,, lls |i nt {j le Democrats will have ccSic'.t .-iiiist.intiaUy. No party has~ to take his handpickeU candidate- cver be.ii so indebted lo a sir.jjle | There have b:en S2iue indications "anhcl." N= wonder that yon never; thc-.;i!h not unmistakable, that! hcr.r any more audible crticlsm pt', naskob would reck the nomination Ri-.slrb within tta Demo;r,i[ic : rf Owen D. Young o; l!i: General ! :ai-|y. I Elrclric. Young would to acccpla- ! IV.i'. l!u- Republicans arc going to We lo many Demccr-is but an, vcnuiid you of It. Last fall they j nlhe'na to many others who worry | ivl:;c[:crl'up the fact thnt in three! abou: the "power trusl" and the ; summer months Mr. Ra;kob l'.a(l i ilciiiinaiion of big business in pol- 1 '• "lent" ihe p-irty S40.COO while oilier | ilics. contributions tola:,?d S150. ! Tl:ere will be a wicir.pr^atl roar "liaise Rjskob Owns I'.uly j if RnsV.ob tfies lo pam through the Tiie Uaskcb rmancinc i;ives ;hcm | i:c:;'.maiu:u -•! a purely Hask-jl) the chr.nee lo --ay that Ras-kub has < ca'-idiiiaii-. And if Ravkcb, who has ta-:--:ht the Demccra'.k party ar.d • .'<> Jar pursiu:d n s'.rlesic policy ot no A- ov.-ns It They will them \.°' mccicsi self-effaceiiv;:it from the i -,:•_• c".n:itry that it i" :\ very Dad | public eyi-. ;-h,ul:l become regarded i I''::L.^- for o^v- jinn t^ c\vn a \xjlit- ; ns a wo:ild-l:o du-tator with large !v'•''"•.:•"•'-v. t- ;3t --* 1 '- R ' 1? ' !;il ' J lr ' cs " : personal ambitions it. Is easy to !.:e •;--:-'lv "i'iirit;o:l lo bo otnin.; a liow the benerus from all that iv.-.-.v ;".;d Ihat the Ileput'.i-.'ans arc ! Kaskob money could be quickly th-'"p.irly of tlic IKop'.c. All ot j neutraliMd. »!-.:(ii will not do the Drain.rats | Whatever the man's muivcs, he a:iy :;c-ri. but they- can J'.i'.l :i"i;rd will :-svr lt> clisplay :i ereat deal of :o'l;e iliairKful to Mr. H.i-koi>. i clitcreucin and lact. He may own 1- v.il! I;;: charged that R.i^ul). in j the party organization. b:it h; iv.'l'.;i-n for his flnancing. csi.t-ci-, to doesn't o>vn the party Itself. WEWOKA, Okla., ndians are getting scarce in Oi;b- After a- protracted search '.!:•: a?ent at the Mekusukcy reservation near hero announced ii: was unable lo find a sincle Indian in need of aid. The search was started;.-when t 'Overwork Duuing Day May Bring licstlcssness at Night j »V DR. MOKKIS K'SIIBFIX 'cue.' b:luccn iiiiyf.c.il Uro:lr.cr, 11: -, .T::ir;i:il rf th- Ain^rit-an and nrvve tirc^n:^. There arc Yifjicil Au;«!:ilicn. and tf Siy- ; come ):hy.-iolcpic tcs;, of -niLicii i ::;J.i. Jiiv lir^lili M:i^.iiiiic j tircdues;. but 50 i.nr as i^ k:i-;r.':i "I:-; ."-pec;! ot mcxlrrr. h.!c is ri:ch ' the cvaiuallcn ot ucrve tircS:icss ;-s t? Jri\e hum.in be;n;s !o lh:ir - intift b^ a p;ycho!o;ic evaiii.T.bn. iCj-.-iv.y of endurance. It seems.The person who is nerve tired U jc ••.'.:!:: I'.v.i: '.',-rre i; a:iy ri-.-.i- \ In liable, his Judgment U no; n t: .i:!n::t sj frcnuinlly :na;'c -i~ fait ' tiusUd, he b2cc;nrs car?lc;s in c[ i,. n-.-. :',;•;] jv.nlkinj and in driving, so t'.-.at i'!i;..:;i.-.r..; h-ivc CJiv.i 1 to rraiizo : th:re are more accidents after f:ur thr,l i.r,.i.i:? crr.u<r pl;y.-i:-.i! ;!is- ! o'clock in Ihe afternoon tlr.r. in . l'.:ibii!i • in ;l:e Uo;ly. .v ::.^;.mef the early mornins. The [erlln; of u:;.,'-:^ 11 ^v.\'',i.;i,'. I.•.!:•:.uo ir.ay ' faliguc »interferes with skill. \vi'.: tc li-.c :,.•.;'.; no: i-.iiy tl ,.-1 '.-inch ' artistic apprcc:atior.. v,uh nt'.cn- :;!y :,,il L.:.,..T, 'c-,/. L./ •• :'. l-j-> iti-ieh ticn. and with Hie ability ID iv- i:;:r.i:i'. ;:•::.•.:•.. j spend lo stlmiiliilicn. 3\- V.'. K. I 1 . Ki-r.::>^r. r::::;;! 1 ^^?? ' The pcr^cr. vv^.o ^v:r.1oc^ di:tm.; !"• • i-;c: :••-••. tV.r h>::r,.-:i !:,-;;vj Is tr.e day is rcsiless al n:-.:i'.: h? can- l.-. n-'< .''.;•;•.:..: r.-.a: i'r •? ;-.r: rest not sleep, hecaus? hi? mind is s::il l:io :,:'. .It ::;;,\. rc>jl:r.' :.-.- :it-.:i cf apprcach cf ovcrfatiju^ is iiibidi:'. 1 :. H.: ar.d nraio r.iios Icr 'n- cisn- There may be hcnaachcs, ncivcii' d:,. 1 : lu rr.'viro it T-i^- i-"'::'.;i may lndii;rsl;cn. p.iiii iu vari:;:s part^ ::.-.-. r.-n ; ...:c t'.i.- :iroci c-; rr'i r.r.d of the tr.ciy. r.n inipr.;:d mc-.r.r.-y ti:' 1 3•'•"'.; u.'.:r. :r.r,;:r s';: • ;i;.v. he ar.ri insbl!iiy U ro:.:;-,'.:. 1 ^'.:. !!:: c:(ler- i:ow that sca-.c people ar; dynamic RKMBiMHER whiil nnr sthuoi hooks Ituiglit us ;it>out fhe lives nf inventors who lived ninny ywirs ago? Mow often we used to read, "He wenl on with his experiments in spite of the liiughler of his friends, ;ind (he riclitulc of his neighbors." ilow different is Ihe modern sliite of mind! This :IKC is rcmark- alilc for its keen awareness of progress ... Ihe engcr M-illiiu;iu'ss uf most of us to ncrepf new things, and Ijctlcr ways. The skeptical person is the exception — expectancy is the rule. If we rusul about ;m invention that will wash (he middle of our backs, we say, "Fair eneujch; tomorrow there will be an .uilumatic way (o keep our noses powdered." is paucr New things and hi'lter ways are announced regularly in ... in the advertisements. Every day you may ho expecting that will make your life easier, pleasanler, more healthful, i'ojsibly a new electrical contriva-uc, or a car that's easier to drive, or a new ilka in break fast fends. I-'ollow the advertising columns . . . and sooner or laicr you'll set the good news. 1'tople who nialie it a point (o know what's going on read the advertisements every dny.

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