Reno Gazette-Journal from Reno, Nevada on April 8, 1989 · Page 9
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Reno Gazette-Journal from Reno, Nevada · Page 9

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Reno, Nevada
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Saturday, April 8, 1989
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Page 9
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Today's TV tip Leo Trevino and Nick Faldo carry a two-stroke lead into today's third round of play In the Masters Tournament at Augusta, Ga. Live coverage begins at 12:30 p.m. on channels 2-9. Saturday APRIL 8, 1989 RENO GAZETTE-JOURNAL Section B 2B BASEBALL, NBA 3B SPECIAL OLYMPICS 5B BOXING 6-7B AT A GLANCE 8-10B BUSINESS , SCORELINE: 3?J$T2 SPORTS EDITOR, MIKE BLACKWELL: 7ft ft ; 3 6345" Latest scores Major League baseball National League Chicago 6, Pittsburgh 5 St. Louis at Philadelphia, ppd, rain Cincinnati 4, San Francisco 3 Montreal 7, New York 3 Atlanta 6, Los Angeles 1 San Diego 5, Houston 3 American League Cleveland 4, New York 2 Detroit 10, Milwaukee 3 Minnesota 8, Baltimore 3 Kansas City 9, Boston 8 Toronto 10, Texas 9 California 2, Seattle 1 Chicago 7, Oakland 1 California League Modesto 9, Reno 4 NBA New Jersey 115, New York 105 Philadelphia 118, Charlotte 108 Atlanta 120, Houston 112 Washington 107, Cleveland 96 Detroit 114, Chicago 112 Dallas 115, Sacramento 102 Utah 99, L.A. Lakers 97 Portland 113, Boston 100 Oilers' Moon now highest paid in NFL HOUSTON - Quarterback Warren Moon signed a five-year, $10 million contract Friday with the Houston Oilers that he said will make him the highest-paid player in the NFL. I was the highest-paid player in Canada, and I was the highest-paid when I came here and I guess now, I'm the highest-paid player again," Moon said. Agent Leigh Steinberg said Moon will receive a $1 million signing bonus and a $500,000 salary in 1989. Moon will receive a $1.5 million salary in 1990, 1991 and 1992 and $4 million in 1993. Denver quarterback John Elway, who earns $2.1 million a year, is currently the highest-paid NFL player, but some of the money is deferred. Asked if Moon was the highest-paid player in the NFL, Steinberg replied, "Yes." Carson improves to 17-2 The Carson High School baseball team scored six runs in the bottom of the sixth inning to post an 8-5 Northern AAA League victory over Sparks Friday in Carson City. Carson improved to 5-1 in league, 17-2 overall. The Senators are tied for first place in the Northern AAA with Reno, idle Friday with a 5-1 league mark. Sparks dropped to 1-7 in league. Sparks took a 5-2 lead in the fifth inning, but sophomore right-hander Travis White shut the Railroaders out over the final two innings to gain the victory. Sparks reliever Tony Salazar took the loss. UNR boxer gains finals COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. -University of Nevada-Reno junior Gary McCoy moved one step closer to a national championship Friday night, knocking out K.C. Jones of the Air Force Academy in the semifinals of the National Collegiate Boxing Championships. McCoy, a 165-pounder from Carson City, was overpowering in his opening bout of the tournament, knocking out Jones just 21 seconds into the first round. McCoy advanced to tonight's finals, where he will meet Tony Fletcher of the United States Military Academy. Fletcher was the 1987 156-pound national champion. McCoy was runner-up in the 147-pound division in 1987 and won the 156-pound class last year. UNR's other fighter entered in the championships, 180-pounder Chris Betts, had his bout stopped in the second round because of an injury. Betts was fighting John Jones of the Naval Academy when Betts injured his left thumb. Dan Bernel of Carson City, fighting for the Military Academy, decisioned Brian Bunch of Cal-Berkeley to advance to the finals of the 156-pound class. UNR wins in 11 innings SAN FRANCISCO - Donnie Angotti's single in the 11th inning drove in John Stevenson from second base to give the University of Nevada-Reno baseball team a 6-5 victory over the University of San Francisco Friday. The Wolf Pack improved to 3-2 in the West Coast Athletic Conference and 20-17 overall. USF fell to 5-3 and 9-16. Former Wooster High School standout Doug Van Tress pitched four innings of relief to pick up his fourth victory against one loss. Starter Rod Nettnin went five innings, allowing three runs, two earned. Thompson rides to victory LEAKEY, Texas - Inga Thompson of Reno outsprinted her rivals Friday to win the sixth and hilliest stage of the Braders Jeans Tour of Texas International bicyle race. Thompson finished with a time of 2:20.12 in the 47-mile event. Wire service and staff reports Trevino, Faldo share 2-shot lead in By Mike LoprestiGannett News Service AUGUSTA, Ga. - It was a day of sand blowing from the bunkers, second-guessed club selections, chilled hands and high scores. But as the third round of the Masters dawns today at wind-swept Augusta National, the gusts from the west and the reality of age have not yet been able to blow Lee Trevino away. The 49-year-old Trevino, beginning Friday by promptly driving into the trees, held together to share the lead with Nick Faldo at 3-under-par 144 after a second round that tested the nerves of every golfer. The pair leads by two over a five-man group at 143, including past winners Seve Ballesteros and Ben Crenshaw. "I think I stuck in there," said Trevino after a 2-over-par 74, which began with two bogeys in the first three holes. "A lot of the other times here, with the way I started, I probably would have thrown everything in and said 'Let's get this over with.' "But I knew par today was 75." With temperatures in the 50s and wind gusts up to 30 I- .y, Faldo miles an hour, Augusta National was a trap in waiting. Only five golfers broke par, led by Ken Green's 69, and only seven stand below par going into today, which is expected to be warmer, but still windy. "I don't have to say anything, there it is," Crenshaw said, pointing toward a scoreboard that showed the field in general retreat. You could tell by the higher scores and worn faces late Friday afternoon. "After playing 18 holes out there today, I have no nerves. They're gone," said Tom Kite, who had a 72 and is three shots back at even-par 144. "It was very close to the toughest I've ever seen at Augusta," said Ballesteros, who four-putted No. 15 and finished with a 72. "My brain's about gone," said Crenshaw, in at 72. "Nobody has any idea how tough that was unless you were out there playing in it," said Greg Norman, whose 75 left him 5-over-par for the tournament and eight strokes back. The wind and chill took its toll on two See MASTERS, page 4B Masters The leader bp?ril Lee Trevino 67-74141 Nick Faldo 68-73141 Ken Green 74-69143 Scott Hoch 69-74143 Mike Reld 72-71143 Seve Ballesteros 71-72143 Ben Crenshaw 71-72143 Tom Kite 72-72144 Tom Watson 72-73145 Curtis Strange 74-71145 MarkO'Meara 74-71145 " " jr ,J?-sr ' '' L.nii.ifr !Zu..hi. iz.jz, .t7, ,v Lrr. .j'J?:"... SS . f ' I tie wer e specaal Craig SailorGazette-Journal THE END: Jim Haddad and Lynnette Meyer carry the Olympic torch at the closing ceremonies. More than 10,000 watch the closing of Special Olympics By Michael Rappaport Gazett adjournal Special Olympians said goodbye to Reno Friday night as one of the largest crowds in recent northern Nevada history packed Lawlor Events Center for the closing ceremonies of the 1989 International Winter Special Olympic Games. A crowd of more than 10,000 athletes, coaches, volunteers and fans crowded into Lawlor, which has a capacity of 11,200, to hear speeches and watch performances by professional skaters and fellow Special Olympians. Figure skaters Jim Haddad of California and Lynnette Meyer of Reno representing the two host states of the '89 Games passed the Olympic torch to figure skater Cora Fraser and floor hockey player Joe Jaeger of Minnesota. The Sierra Skating Club carried in the Special Olympics flag and handed it over to the University of Minnesota hockey cheerleaders. Minneapolis-St. Paul will serve as the host cf the 1991 Summer Games. For Jaeger, it was a big moment in more ways than one. He had never worn ice skates before being chosen to represent the non-skaters in the Minnesota delegation. "When my Aunt Donna read the news about me being picked, she got a tear in her eye just like that," Jaeger said. "I had a Special Olympics has meant a lot to me. It's really changed my life. Joe Jaeger chance to practice some, and when I got out there and the lights went on and everyone was cheering, I knew I was going to be all right. "Special Olympics has meant a lot to me. It's really changed my life." Fraser got her one moment in time as well. The top gold medal winner in women's Level IV figure skating was one of those selected to perform in the ice show, and she earned a standing ovation from her peers and the other spectators. Haddad also performed a solo routine, Charles Hauber and Lisa Elsener of Kansas skated a double, New Jersey skater Mitzi Zander skated with her coach Bill Schank, and Whitney Smull of Delaware skated with Snoopy and Woodstock. A number of professional and world-class amateur skaters also performed, but the loudest ovations were reserved for the Special Olympians. With the last of the competition See GAMES, page 38 Page 3B Olympians shine on ice Fraser was something special Pro basketball players get chance to go for gold MUNICH, West Germany (AP) - The United States, which lost the Olympic gold medal in basketball with college players, will be able to use professionals to get it back in 1992. FIBA, the international basketball federation, voted overwhelmingly at a special session Friday to allow professionals in the Olympics and other world competition. "We see this as our triumphant entry into the 21st century," said Boris Stanko-vic, general secretary of FIBA, the international basketball federation. Almost certainly, it will be a triumphant entry for the Americans, who voted against the pro-eligibility plan but clearly welcomed the 56-13 vote. "For more than 40 years, our country has been discriminated against because we could not use our best players," said Dave Gavitt, commissioner of the collegiate Big East Conference and president of the USA Amateur Basketball Association. "For the first time, our country will be able to play on a level field with our best players no age limits, no constraints." Gavitt said he bowed to college and high school basketball in voting "no" and that much work had to be done before NBA stars could wear "USA" on their jerseys and play for medals in Barcelona in 1992. He said professionals could be playing for U.S. national squads as early as this summer. The new eligibility rules, which apply to players in all professional leagues worldwide and at all FIBA-sanctioned championships, took effect immediately. The NBA issued a statement in New York which said the league and the play ers' union is working to develop a framework for players to participate. "We have also begun a constructive dialogue (with the Amateur Basketball Association) and its president . . . and expect to begin meetings shortly to resolve the number of issues that are presented by this new era of open basketball," Russ Granik, the league's executive vice president, said in the statement. The Goodwill Games, to be played in Seattle next year, said it hoped to have pros playing in its basketball tournament. Silver Sox drop opener, 9-4 By Larry BadenGazette-Journai The lights went out Friday night at Moana Municipal Stadium. A short time later, Modesto's Jorge Brito turned out the lights on the Reno Silver Sox season opener. On the first pitch after a blown fuse caused an 18-minute delay, Brito blasted a three-run homer over the left-field fence. Brito's eighth-inning homer off Reno reliever Ranfred Johnson turned a close game into a 9-4 A's victory. "He served me up a fastball and I got all of the middle of it," Brito said of his homer that gave Modesto an 8-2 lead. "With two men on and no one out, I just wanted to hit the ball good and I did that." Brito's homer was the A's second three-run shot of the game. Ron Witmeyer hit a three-run homer off Reno starter Mike Anderson in the third inning. The two big hits proved to be the difference in the game, which was played before 2,3 spectators. "Anytime you hit a three-run homer, there's a good chance it's going to break open a game," said Modesto first-year manager Lcnn Sakata. "We've got a pretty strong hitting team and they went right after it from the start." Modesto, though, didn't do all that much in the first seven innings off Anderson and Reno reliever Gil Villanueva. Anderson gave up but three hits in his four innings. Witmeyer's homer, though, staked Modesto to a 5-1 lead. These kids will be all right. They weren't awed by this kid (Modesto pitcher Joe Slusarski). We played hard and kept coming after them, j Ell GrbaSilver Sox' manager Villanueva pitched three strong innings in which he allowed no runs. But he walked the first two batters in the eighth and was removed from the game by Reno manager Eli Grba. That's when the lights went out and when things got dark for the Silver Sox. "These kids will be all right," Grba said of his team. "They weren't awed by this kid (Modesto pitcher Joe Slusarski). We played hard and kept coming after them." Slusarski, a member of the 1988 U.S. Olympic Team, hardly was awed by his first professional start. He held the Silver Sox to four hits and one earned run in seven innings before he reached his 100-pitch limit. "I mainly just wanted to see how far I could go with my fastball," Slusarski said. "I mixed in my slider, but I didn't throw an off-speed pitch all night." See SILVER SOX, page 2B t , 4 i Patrick FordenGazeHe-Joumal SAFE: Modesto's Darren Lewis slides safely into second as Reno's Shawn Barton reaches for a late throw to the bag.

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