Reno Gazette-Journal from Reno, Nevada on December 15, 1977 · Page 45
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Reno Gazette-Journal from Reno, Nevada · Page 45

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Reno, Nevada
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Thursday, December 15, 1977
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Page 45
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' i in "wt y y w w o w r i Airp ort tower "coiildri't reach Evansville pilot By HARRY F. ROSENTHAL ' EVANSVILLE, Ind (AP) - As charter plane N51071 took off on its death flight on a runway hidden from their view, tower controllers were startled to hear the engines apparently heading straight toward their glass enclosure. "They became vastly concerned," said National Transportation Safety Board member Philip Hogue. "The wanted to know what heading the aircraft was on." Twice, in quick succession, the tower tried to raise the pilot of the flight, with its human cargo of 14 college basketball players and 15 others. Related stories on page 31 "The aircraft never had a chance to K respond for reasons we're not sure of, but obably due to whatever was taking place the cockpit just before they crashed," Hogue said Wednesday after the first full day of investigation. Hogue said he had been mistaken earlier whenne said that the tower called the plane to warn of suddenly worsening weather. It was rainy and foggy at the time. He said the engine sound was described like that of a runaway propeller, the power surge of an engine that throws the aircraft's thrust off balance. "I don't know that this is so by any means," said Hogue, speaking for the group of NTSB investigators that flew to Evansville hours after the crash Tuesday night. A memorial service was held Wednesday for the University of Evansville basketball players who died when the plane hit a rise at the edge of the airfield two or three minutes after takeoff. Other services were planned for today and Sunday. The last two bodies, those of the pilot and the president of the charter company, were removed from the wreckage Wednesday. Hogue said the DC-3, an aircraft considered the workhorse of aviation, had a total 19,772.2 hours flight time and that its last major overhaul was in October 1956. Hogue said the aircraft had flown 9,500 hours since then, well below the total 12,000 miles at which another major overhaul would have been required. He said investigators had found no evidence of any fire aboard the aircraft during its brief flight, and he corrected an earlier statement that the landing gear was down and locked in position. "Contrary to our earlier information," he said "the gear was up." The plane headed south down the runway and turned to the left, making almost a complete arc before crashing. "the theory about the aircraft attempting to return (to the airport) is just that, a theory," Hogue said. "The position of the aircraft suggests that possibly was the case." Asked whether there was any indication the plane might have been locked Into the turn through some malfunction, Hogue replied: "No, we don't have that information now, and we don't have anything to support that at the present time. It's a thing we're trying to look at. The pilot, Ty Van Pham, a Vietnamese refugee, held an air transport rating and had 9,100 hours total flight time, 4,200 of them as a captain, Hogue said. Hogue said the engines will be tested in Winston-Salem, N.C., and the wreckage will be assembled in a hangar at the Evansville airport. "We'll know a lot more after we get a return report on the engines," Hogue said. "We will either find that they are at fault and to what degree, or that there was no fault with the power plant and then we'll have to proceed to other areas." Moment of grief Classmates, friends and residents of Evansville. Ind. consoled one another Wednesday as they left New Chapel on the University of Evansville campus following a service for members of the college basketball team. Twenty-nine persons, Including the team's players, coaches and administrative personnel, perished when a chartered plan crashed on takeoff Tuesday night. (APWlrephoto) listed with the National Association of Social Workers, a Sylvia Porter of Select proper therapy based on method and fee ;'The most important thing to look for on your first visit to any health care professional," advises Ken Frank of the National Institute of Psychotherapies, "is the feeling of being understood, of having made emotional contact." Since this initial visit can be traumatic, you should be able to discuss dollars-and-cents issues freely, to ask straightforward questions about the therapist's methods and credentials. The therapist may have a fixed fee. If it is too high for you, he or she may refer you to another in your price range or perhaps, agree to work with you on a sliding scale basis. Often, a therapist with a fixed fee will make allowances for your special circumstances or needs. ; In addition to the fee, what about the therapist's policy on missed sessions? Some therapists require you to pay for a missed session unless you give 24 hours' notice of cancellation. Also at the start of your therapy, decide how you will handle vacations both yours and the therapist's. And how will any of the therapist's increases in fees be taken care of? If you are paying up to the limit of what you can afford, this can be a crucial question. Also, what about the method of payment? Will it be every month, or at the conclusion of each visit? Do not be startled if your therapist requests payment at each visit. "Psychotherapists probably have a tougher time than most collecting fees," reported the newsletter Psychotherapy Economics, after a special study of fees. "The main reason is that their fees, and any discussion about them, tend to become intertwined with the therapy process." Because this is so touchy an issue with both your therapist and you, have it clearly spelled out before you ever begin. Finally, ask to which professional organization your therapist belongs. For instance, a social worker would be Business survey shows 50-50 recession chance economy's posture in four years. At the same time, 84 percent expect increased sales by that time and 53 percent anticipate increased profits. psychiatrist with the American Board of Psychiatrists. Probably, though, the most befuddling aspect psyenomerapy is tne wiae range oi techniques modalities available. Psychoanalysis, as originated by Sigmund Freud, is perhaps the best-known as well as oldest system. This, explains Henry Grayson, board chairman and founder of the National Institute for the Psychotherapies, emphasizes "obtaining an insightful and penetrating connection between the individual's present day psychological difficulties and problems . . . unsuccessfully dealt with in the formative years of life." Behavior therapy concentrates on changing destructive behavior patterns for Instance, curing such irrational fears as claustrophobia (fear of enclosed places). Gestalt means "the whole," and its emphasis is on experiencing the here-and-now more freely and spontaneously. Integrative therapy is specifically tailored to your needs, can reduce the length of treatment and thus the cost. Primal therapy takes you back to your earliest memories, especially the traumatic ones, encourages you to relive them consciously and let them go. Transactional analysis (originated by Eric Berne, author of the best-selling "Games People Play") clearly identifies your three personality states parent, adult, or child to help you change your behavior relatively quickly in the way you wish. , Group therapy can include any of the above systems, or a combination of several. It provides a laboratory where group members can practice being connected with themselves and others, allows for direct expression of both positive and negative feelings in the group. "The difference in techniques can be filtered down into two basic approaches," according to Al Yassky, Ph.D., founder oi tne Mental Health Help Line in New York. "There is cognitive 'thinking' therapy with an emphasis on figuring things out. This would include psychoanalysis and transactional analysis. Then there is feeling therapy which WASHINGTON (AP)-A survey of businessmen shows they think there is a 50 percent chance of an economic recession within the next two years. The Business Confidence Survey conducted by the Gallup Economic Service also found the businessmen believe there is a 15 percent ; chance, of an economic . setback within a year. The poll, conducted during October and ; November, got responses from 1,200 of 2,000 businessmen who were mailed the questionnaires. Meanwhile, President Carter told corporate leaders Wednesday night: "There are no serious or major imbalances in the economy that are often present in a period of recovery." In a speech to the Business Council, Carter said his administration is trying to expand business activity. . "I can only be successful if you are. You can only be successful if I do a good lob aspresident," Carter said. The business poll was taken in October and November. More than half the respondents said they expect the government will do a poor job in dealing with inflation and unemployment in the next two years. Only 2 percent of the businessmen said they foresaw a good performance by the Carter administration and Congress. The poll found 31 percent of the businessmen are optimistic and 28 percent pessimistic about the JAXMAR Sansabelt, probably the most comfortable slack you'll ever wear. 323-2319 32 to 56 waist 488 Klatike Ln. MH-Fri. 10-9 Seiio-i Un4my CltiW Nevada Savings And Loan Association is offering Certificates of Deposit 100,000 or more & 90-day term at 6.75 180-day term at 7.00 1-year term at 7.25 Rates subject to change. Total amount of certificates offered is limited. For complete details call (702)826-1100 in Reno AND LOAN ASSOCIATION Resources over 14 Billion Dollars 10 Offices Serving Nevada Statewide Circus Circus expansion denial 'no big setback' LAS VEGAS (AP) -Officials at the Circus Circus Hotel and Casino here are mulling an expansion plan. In the meantime, the hotel's president, William G. Bennett, said Wednesday that a ruling by the Reno City Council earlier this week is "no big setback" for the resort's plans to build a 600-room hotel and casino in Reno. A decision is expected sometime later this week on the Las Vegas project, which would add 400 rooms to the original Circus Circus, bringing its room total to 1,200. Additional bar, restaurant and parking facilities also would be included. The timing of the project depends on efforts to obtain about $10 million to finance the project. Bennett said the Las Vegas expansion is definitely needed, and that it will become a reality within a year. In Reno, the City Council rejected a request from Circus Circus officials for a sewer application which would have allowed the construction of a high-rise building in conjunction with the hotel's development plans in that city. Bennett said approval of the request would have allowed construction to begin in two or three months, which would have been well ahead of the original schedule. Circus Circus already has sewer service for a 102-room hotel and casino in the downtown Reno area, and plans to open in May or June. Bennett said the rejection of the sewer application for the additional rooms is only a temporary thing and that he expects to get the go-ahead on the project within a year. Reno is now caught in the throes of a building boom reminiscent of the expansion era that built the Las Vegas Strip. would include primal and gestalt." And there are many other therapies which work on triggering your emotional responses to help you to overcome your mental illness. Here I've covered just a few of the many techniques offered. SUNDAY ; Insurance coverage. fresh GP(llb SERF00D 907 W MOAN A IANI MOAN WW U MIS QUALIFIED BUYER WANTS TO PURCHASE 1-JAC2EUOU5E 20,000 to 100,000 square leel. Submit data including location, price, terms, present tenants, and operating statement to: Gazette Journal Box 15787 Reno, Nev. 89520 This coupon can help you cut taxes. Mail it in for free information about a convenient way to enjoy tax-free income: municipal bond funds. I am interested in... Attractive, competitive interest rates. Like those now 1 available on investment-quality municipal bond funds. 2 Tax-free income. 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The issues are all investment grade. They are rated A or better by Moody's or Standard & Poor's. 5 No red tape, extra charges or bookkeeping problems. This is a virtually "care-free" way to invest. There are no coupons to clip. No management fee or redemption fee. 6"Easy-to-buy" investment units. All I need invest is approximately $1,000. I may purchase as many units of this size as I wish. Reinvestment not available to Texas residents. address city state zip Bache clients give name and office of account executive i Bache Halsey Stuart Shield Incorporated Reno Evening Gazette nmrsday,Decl5t1977 45. i JJL ii ii at. I. ih. im . . , .. --" r H " " "-'-""ilrtf'w ' ' ..fct..h.j.a.

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