Greensburg Daily News from Greensburg, Indiana on November 22, 1947 · Page 6
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Greensburg Daily News from Greensburg, Indiana · Page 6

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Saturday, November 22, 1947
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Page Six GREENSBURG (IND.) DAILY NEWS Saturday, November 22, 1947. Home Dangerous Place Traffic accidents took the lives of 83,500 Americans in 1946, but the home toll still led the accidental death parade with 34,000, the National Safety council reports. Hiker's Trail The Appalachian trail, which extends for 2,050 miles from Maine to Georgia along the crest of the Appalachian mountains, is solely for foot travel by hikers. © iS THE Ur:20LS7ERY RUG AND FOAM CLEANER M t"ina Foam is a recent development that does an OUTSTANDING FOAM CLEANING JOB on RUGS and UPHOLSTERY. Drys Quickly . . . Easily Applied . . . Odorless . ... Non Irritating To Hands . . . Non Explosive. Especially fine for Auto Upholstecy. QUARTS 79c GALLONS $1.95 FIlTfK HUffli gfauttn. m> more dirty nandJ, soiled clothing or flying dost from emptying the T«cmun cleaner bag. All dirt 15 stored U a metal dost collector emptied oflce a month, like a wastebasket! Fast, easy, sanitary! Cleaner comes equipped with full set of deluxe attachments for dusting, waxing, moth proofing. See the amazing FILTER QUEEN, todayl $94.50 Only $19.50 down and $6.99 per month. with the powerful McCORMICK-DEERl.MG No. 30 POWER LOADER See us now for full details Greensburg Implement Co. CHAS. A. LAYTON & SONS Mrs. Otto Maynard, of Jfew Point, who is critically ill, was reported unimproved today. Mrs. Julia Deem, of New Point, was a local shopper today. Harry Hosier, of Enochsburg, was a visitor in New Point today. Leel Freeland called on relatives today at New Point. Mrs. Ray Meyerrose, of New Point, is reported ill. Miss June Wolfe, of Indianapolis, is spending the week-end with homefolk at New Point. John Taylor has. returned to his work at the Nu-Way barber shop after a week's illness. Mrs. Grace Wiley, of Letts, a patient at Memorial hospital, is reported improving. Mrs. Robert Donnell, of,.R. R. 8, is leaving Monday for Chicago to visit relatives. Mr. and Mrs. E. P. Lewis were at Bloomington today for the Indiana-Purdue football game. Mr. and Mrs. Orris Elder and daughter, Diana, and Carolyn Hancock, were in Indianapolis Friday night for the Sonja Henie Ice Revue. The Misses Katherine and Margaret Stier, of Cincinnati, will be Sunday guests of Mr. and Mrs. John Loyd and other relatives. Gen.Pershing's Office Is Mow In The Pentagon By George Moise (INS Staff Correspondent) Washington, Nov. 22.—The Army moved a new desk into the Pentagon today, a desk that will be accorded the greatest respect-even though it will never be used. For the sign on the desk says: "Gen. Pershing." Old Black Jack has rejoined the armed services in spirit if not in body. While he remains at Walter Reed hospital — and probably will remain there for the rest of his life—his office has been moved into the proper military atmosphere. For many years the staff of the United States' only general of the armies worked in a spacious office in the old state department building next to the White House on Pennsylvania avenue. But the Pentagon, across the river in Virginia, was the center of the Pershing's office b e- there, but sentiment, Army. Gen longed Mr. and Mrs. William Land, Mrs. Mae Sirrhon, Jimmy McKim and Leo Ruhi have returned from a trip to Niagara Falls, N. Y., where they were called by the death of Mrs. Land's uncle, James Sirmon. Sgt and Mrs. James McCullough, of Junction City, Kans., are the parents of a baby boy born Oct. 22. He has been named James Glenn. Sgt. McCullpugh is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Simon McCullough, of Westport. Mr. and Mrs. George H. Bailey, of Schenectady, N. Y., are visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. George N. Reed, near Adams. Mr. and Mrs. Fred Hallenbeck, also of Schenectady, who accompanied them here, have returned home. WARTIME (Continued from Page One) from California, told the committee: "I don't believe there are any words in the English language that could describe the depths to which he (Meyers) has sunk." The day before he had hidden his feelings behind a masklike face as he heard Meyers declare that his relationship with Mrs. LaMarre was with her husband's "knowledge, 1 approval and acquiescence." But he gave vent to those feelings on his return to the stand, when he choked out: "It is my sincere hope that this committee will make Gen T eral Meyers crawl out of this room on his belly like the snak« that he is." LaMarre issued a blanket denial of Meyers remarks about his wife. He also denied Meyers' claim that he and Thomas Readnower, vice-president of the Dayton company and Mrs. LaMarre's brother, gave "false testimony." Meyers had closed his testimony with the declaration that he never got anything more from the Dayton firm—Aviation Electric Corp.—than repayment of loans owed either by the company or by the LaMarres. LaMarre and Readnower had testified that Meyers received $200,000—$150,000 of it clear profit—of Aviation Electric's income from government aviation subcontracts. LaMarre told the committee: "General Meyers before this committee called me a liar. He has called Mr. Readnower a liar. I wish to state now that we have told the truth in every respect and the the truth is docu- Imented." He also charged that Meyers had "initiated a smear campaign" against him and his wife i and the Readnowers. i MOVIE PLOT ! Grants Pass, Ore.—Mrs. Mar| garita Brotzman, 93 saw her first movie recently. She was hired to the show by an 83-year-old woman friend. calls for a gracious home ... and attention focuses most of all on the company rooms . . . living room and dining room. Select furnishings of quality and beauty for gracious hospitality. THE SCHULTZ -CO. West Main St. Henry L. Oliger, Proprietor. Dial 4151. made vocal by the American Legion and other veterans' and patriotic organizations, kept it in its original building. Finally, however, the White House needed space in the next-door building, and the Army decided to bring its .highest officer home. Presiding over the office is Col. James M. Adamson, military secretary to the general of the armies. Col. Adamson joined the general during the Mexican campaign in 1916. Adamson, like his chief, has a title unique in the Army. His position as military secretary was created by act of congress, just as was the rank of general of the armies. Pershing outranks later five star generals, such as Eisenhower, MacArthur and Arnold. They are generals of the army—singular, not plural like Pershing. Not As Luxurious Adamson has done what he could to make the new office like the old one, but he said it is about one-third as large and not as luxurious. The general's four star flag—two horizontal stars on either side of an American eagle—is behind the desk on one' side. An American flag stands on the other side. There also are two busts of Pershing, but the portraits of the four predecessors whose rank equalled that of Black Jack —Washington, Grant, Sherman and Sheridan—are missing. Adamson explained that they needed retouching, and then when they were fixed up they would again grace the walls of Pershing's office. Adamson, who at 72 is 15 years younger than his chief, says that most of the business of the office is handling some 1,000 letters a week that are addressed to Pershing. Most of the letters Adamson classifies as fan mail. Others are questions on World War I operations that are still being asked. Those that are answered and shown to the general, however, are from hundreds of old friends and Army comrades. Adamson says it would be impossible to answer the others. tria today to cope with impending Communist-led insurrection in the midst of a national • political and economic crisis. France is still without a premier although Finance Minister Robert Shuman, popular Re'pub-: lican, seemed virtually assured of a parliamentary vote of confidence if he accepts President Vincent Auriol's offer to head the government. Highly authoritative sources disclosed exclusively to INS that the battle-trained veterans are pouring into France by train and motorized convoy. The explosive French labor situation grew worse as numerous railroad workers walked out in the capital and other parts of the country. The number of strikers reached the million mark. The action on the part of the general staff is the first part of a plan designed to frustrate reported Communist intentions to capitalize on French political and economic turmoil by fomenting civil war. The actual number of troops actually involved in this movement is a military secret, but it is reliably reported to run into the thousands. The total number of French occupation troops is estimated at around 60,000. About 15,000 are in the French zone of Austria and the remainder in Germany. The rest of France's first class fighting forces are in North Africa and Indo-China. This emergency recall order coupled with the call to active duty of 70,000 conscripts is taken EX-SECRETARY (Continued from Page One) public life, Davis was elected United States Pennsylvania to senator from fill a vacancy for the term expiring in 1933 and was twice reelected, com- oleting his senate service in 1945. "Puddler Jim" earned his nickname when he went to work as a steel puddler's assistant in Sharon, Pa., at the age of 11. At 16, he was a full-fledged puddler in Pittsburgh. Davis was born in Tredegar, South Wales, on Oct. 27, 1873, the son of David James and Esther Ford Davis. He came to the United States with his parents in 1881. He entered politics in Elwood, Ind., a city later to become famous through the late Wendell Willkie's association with it. Davis went to Elwood in 1893 to work in a steel mill. He was elected city clerk in 1898 and later served a four-year term as Madison county recorder. Early in life, Davis became affiliated witKthe Loyal Order of Moose and at the age of 33 was elected director general of the fraternal organization, which under his leadership increased its membership to over 600,000. Scientists Examine Pre-Historic Site (By Internatiovxi M^ws Service) Chicago. — An archaeological expidition fro mthe Chicago Natural History musuem, is ready to delve into the secrets of this continent's past. Scientists with the group will do their digging 7,000 feet above sea level in western New Mexico, where they have discovered relics from the pre-historic Mogollon Indian culture (500 A.D.). The site was found by two members of the expedition, Dr. John Riualdo, an archaological assistant at the museum, and E. B. Sayle of the University of Arizona. They discovered undecorated pottery and stone tools, together with a few shallow depressions which indicated that an ancient. Mogollon village of pit-houses Recall French Units To Cope With Reds (By international News Service) guns, mortars and grenades were Paris, Nov. 22.—Crack French occupation back from units we Germany •e rushed and Aus- as absolute government indication expects that the serious trouble and probable armed revolt by the Reds. The general staff's decision to put its plan into effect was believed prompted by the reported order received by French Communists from Belgrade headquarters of the Cominform to mobilize against the government. In the meantime. President Vincent Auriol conferred with political leaders of so-called center parties in an urgent effort to nominate a premier to head the government. Finance Minister Robert Schuman, popular Republican, was replacing ex-Premier Paul Reynaud as most likely to be named. Following a secret conference With the President Schuman began talks with prominent figures in the finance ministry. Upon leaving the Palace Elysee, Schuman declared that he had been proffered the premiership and promised to reply to the offer before the national assembly -meets today. Rail Strike Meanwhile, France's drastic strike situation mounted in intensity as Paris railway employees walked out. As the toll of strikers in a wide variety of occupations mounted to the million mark, all rail traffic was at a standstill at the Lyon station.' North station main line traffic was flowing but suburban trains out of the capital were functioning at one quarter the usual volume. Strikers outside of Paris blocked the tracks to prevent Lhe passage of trains on some lines. Thi national assembly turned down by the narrow margin of nine votes the appeal of 75- year.-old Blub for a middle-road government to avert insurrection. The balloting was 300 in the Socialist veteran's favor and 277 against him. In the resulting political stalemate. Gen. Charles De Gaulle reportedly dispatched his aide- Gen. Georges Catroux, French ambassador to Moscow—to Germany for conferences with the French occupation commander. Sixty thousand trained troops are under the command of Gen. Joseph-Marie friend of De Koenig, an Gaulle's, in old the French zore of Germany. seized. Political- observers declared that the assembly's repudiation of Blum brought De Gaulle and his "French People's Rally" one step nearer to power. Blum had attacked De-Gaulle in his appeal as a would-be dictator. Tall, vigorously ami-rCommu- rtist De Gaulle, maintained a stony silence in the face of the latest developments which may project him into the premiership of France. His advisers in the capital held their views in the strictest reserve. Underwriters Hold Ladies' Night Meet Ladies' night was marked Friday evening when members and Harold B. Ogden, vocalist. Nate Kauffman, of Shelbyville, president of the association, was in charge of the meeting. Arrangements for the session were made by Paul White guests of the Decatur-Shelby-1 and Harold B Ogden Johnson Life Underwriters As-' sociation held a dinner and program at the Y. M. C. A. Henry Henningsen was the speaker and presented a humorous talk. Music was provided Colonial Lousetrap In 1759 Enoch Noyes invented a fine and coarse tooth comb called "lousetrap" and launched Amer- XJU£> VttiiV. i¥i \_tOlV, W CIO }JJ. \J V iUt\_i J » a A t_ » by a trio composed of Mrs. Joej «a s first comb Industry. Later he R. Campbell, pianist, Mrs. Omer I mtrod u c ed the "case comb" • best E. Warneke, violinist, and Mrs. seUer for y ears - JOERGER (Continued from Page One) paragraph of the Friday account in the News, it was said Marion Fenley declared he saw Dale Richardson "sock" Joerger. This statement is said to have been, correctly, that Fenley "saw or thought he saw Richardson strike at the accused." The "knuck" business is also involved in that the instrument is described as being made of an iron rod shaped like half of a squat hour glass. Friday afternoon, Chain Man tooth said on the stand he made the device for Dale Richardson, who said he was going to put it in a bull's nose. Further, it was reported that the last named was wear- j ing the device on his hand in an altercation with Joerger several years ago. Actual testimony is said to have been that Dale took the device from his pocket and flung it into a ditch at this time. Rogers On Stand Friday afternoon brought Virgil Rogers, bartender at Club 46, to the stand to say a door at the east end of the bar was locked and covered with beer cases preventing its use. This was evidently a defense move to refute any intimation that the accused used this door to get from the barroom to the main hall and intercept the Richardson party. Mrs. Cora Fields, Connersville friend of Mr. and Mrs. Pearl Adams, who managed the club at the time, was in the check room opening onto the little hallway where the violence occurred. She was very near the action but was said to have had her back turned for most of the time. She said she heard Raymond "Cotton" Richardson say threatening words followed by, "He has had it coming to him for 10 years." This same statement was attributed to Joerger by a state witness. Mrs. Dorothy Webster, Decatur court reporter, testified her records of previous hearings here were correct as near as she understood those who testified at these times. Chain Mantooth then appeared and told of making the instrument described as both "knucks" and "a bull ring." He said he had Toyland At Lerman Bros. QUALITY TOYS PRICED RIGHT A small deposit will hold any purchase until Christmas. i! for a customer it was a "bull made another who had said ring." Leslie McMillan said he had worked with Dale Richardson and that he tired easily and appeared to be in poor health. Bert OHphant, of Adams, said he had had a fight with Dale Richardson 15 years ago and that he drew a black eye. Dennis Scott is reported to have said he was with Raymond Joerger when the latter was accused of trying to use his car to run over "Cotton" Richardson several years ago. Scott said the car missed Richardson by five feet and was the last witness of the day. $7.95 PIUS TAX WITH LOCK Right "on the style -beaml Terrific choice for pleaiur* or business. Simulated leathers in various colon. Has striking whit* saddla stitching. '• ' • COLORS: Red-Black-Brown-Green-Blue-Tan. With o» 'without lock. Padded top and bottom. Full sized mirror. Simulated leathers. Size 14" x 10" x 4".' I/JUUti once occupied Reserve, N. M. the area near Try a News want aa tomorrow. It has long been taken for granted in France that De Gaulle would call on his former comrades in the Free French forces in case of the threat of imminent civil war. De Gaulle's Followers Besides Koenig's war-hardened veterans, most garrisons within France are under the command of De Gaulle followers. Indication that the Communists are . massing their forces for a showdown came from ex- Premier Bhim, who warned the assembly that "international Communism has openly declared war on French democracy." Blum's newspaper—Le Pop- ulaire—reported that messages intercepted by the government I showed iv iat France's Communist party, under orders from the Cominform in Belgrade, was "mobilizing its troops against the Republican regime." The paper added: "The Communist party yesterday ordered its men and its arms to mass in Paris. "Communist fighters have been ordered to go to the capital from the provinces. "This is proved by Communist order intercepted by the government. "The Communists will use 'Molotov bombs'." The ministry of the interior reported in the meantime that three separate arms caches have FARMER DIES (Continued from Page UIMJ and' children, survivors include: Two sisters, Mrs. Gussie Kreag, St. Petersburg, Fla., and Mrs. Catherine Funkhouser, Dayton, Ohio, and eight grandchildren. Funeral services will be held in the Wenning and Porter funeral home Monday at 2 p. m., with the Rev. William Fred McCoy officiating. Burial will be in the Union cemetery. Friends may call at the funeral home at 7:30 this evening. T)ime T)o ABOUT YOUR HEATING PROBLEMS. See us about Kresky or Wayne Oil Furnace, also Bryant Gas Furnaces. HAMILTON PHS08I been uncovered in scattered parts of the country. Several persons were arrested in the raids in wh'ich" machine Six-Unit ELECTRIC FREIGHT 14.95 • Track Connecter and Transformer Included An electric train as fine as this is a real buy at this low price. Has a beautiful, streamlined locomotive, tender, gondola car, cattle car with sliding doors tank car and caboose. Has 120 inches of oval track. "027" gauge. REED & LYNCH FIRESTONE STORE

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