The Salina Journal from Salina, Kansas on October 11, 1997 · Page 5
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The Salina Journal from Salina, Kansas · Page 5

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Salina, Kansas
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Saturday, October 11, 1997
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Page 5
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THE SALINA JOURNAL FASHION SATURDAY, OCTOBER 11. 1997 Ag AFTER A FASHION Underwear wearers, beware! Underpants may be hazardous to your health .,('Pee,pee,PEE!"Kristene Whitmore says, brazenly turning her head in three different directions to project her voice into the far corners of the restaurant — * which, except for us, is pretty much empty so there's nobody to look shocked. Whitmore is demonstrating her contention that it's OK to say "i>ee" now. Even PATRICIA 10 years ago, she MCLAUGHLIN syndicate 4 Which made her job that much Harder. Now she Says it all the time. Whitmore is a urologist, co-author of "Overcoming Bladder Disorders." (Consider the difficulties of writing a whole book about a function that could only be named in a whisper.) .' She contends that at least some of the women who suffer repeated ttrinary tract infections — and 1 out of 5 American women will " Kave at least one — are fashion Victims. Many doctors advise Qieir women patients to wear cotton underpants because they •ibreathe"! Whitmore, chief of urology at Graduate Hospital in Philadelphia, goes further, telling h>r patients not to wear any. * "Bugs grow when they're trapped," she says, especially when they're trapped in a hot, dark, moist place behind layers of Spandex. £ This is something our fore- jrnothers may have suspected but neglected to mention to most of us. For centuries, they wore tons of underwear — shifts and chemises and petticoats and corsets and corset covers — but nothing even remotely like underpants. ^According to costume historian Q;-Willett Cunnington's "English Women's Clothing in the 18th dentury," first published in 1937, drawers were up to about 1800 "a pjurely masculine or children's garment, and the adoption of tjiem by women was at first regarded as savouring of depravity, even abroad." ,-» -* Only worn by actresses '-!* In Paris, that proverbial sink of ijiiquity, only actresses wore them as late as 1783. Cunnington quotes a letter written around 1850 by Lady Chesterfield to her d)aughter that describes "skirts that ended one inch above my an- cdes showing the vandyked or willed edges of those comfortable garments which we have bor- rpwed from the other sex, and w.hich all of us wear but none of us talk about." 3 Even when ladies like Lady Chesterfield did begin wearing Qiem, their drawers were at first Distinctly plural: There were two, one for each leg, separately but equally suspended from a drawstring or waistband, with the crotch left open. Trousers were apparently so firmly identified with male power and prerogatives that it seemed wrong, unnat- ifral, even blasphemous for women to wear a garment anything like them; In the long perspective of costume history, ladies' underpants are the merest blip. Are they also a mistake? < v-.iA,"' Universal Press In the large scheme of things, underpants for women are a relatively new necessity, one borrowed from men and children. In fact, when women began experimenting with "bloomers" and divided skirts for bicycling in the late 1800s, religious fundamentalists threatened them with eternal perdition based on a prohibition on cross-dressing in Deuteronomy. Closed-crotch drawers racy Amazing how fast eternal verities change: A hundred or so years ago, Frederick's of Hollywood would've been selling racy closed-crotch drawers to hussies, while respectable ladies preferred the traditional open-crotch version. Now it's precisely the opposite. Struck by this "profound reversal in meanings," Jill Field, a research assistant in history at the University of Southern California, embarked on a study of the drawers in the collection of the Royal Ontario Museum. In a recent issue of the journal DRESS, she reports that their open-crotch drawers tended to be paired with lacy, low-cut camisoles, while closed-crotch drawers were more often matched to camisoles of heavier cotton with more modest necklines. Which led Field, who before her research had been "familiar only with contemporary eroticized meanings of open- crotch underwear" — the Frederick's 'of Hollywood kind — to wonder whether open crotches might've held a sexual meaning even for 19th-century women. Kristina Haugland, assistant curator of the costume collection and resident underwear historian at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, doubts it. Haugland says there's nothing even distantly erotic about some of the open-crotch drawers in her museum's collection. She suspects that the popularity of open- crotch drawers in the 19th century and even into the beginning of the 20th had more to do with the persistence of established custom and the practical advantages of the open crotch. Ventilation is good, for instance, as per Whit more's prescription. It's also good — especially when you have 8 inches of lace insertions at the hems of your drawers — not to have to lower them in order to (as Whitmore says it's now OK to say) pee. After all, how clean were the floors of those outhouses? # .» .1 i« trench claim all-cotton shirt with no wrinkles jjgPARIS — A French firm ap- Fgjars to have resolved the sticky fsjue of which shirt to wear: the Cjbjton one which needs to be j£qned or the polyester variety which makes you sweat. j Pierre Clarence claims to have taken the strain out of looking good by inventing the world's first non-crease, non-iron shirt in flure cotton. ; "This is truly a revolution,'" said Philippe Dumont, managing director. "According to our calcu- &tions, France's 18,611,000 house- tyolds spend a billipn hours a year Boning. Imagine the difference." « The shirt could be on sale in Britain before the end of the year. Targeted at both men who live alone and at women who usually get stuck with the family ironing, the shirt not only irons itself, but actively resists crumpling while you wear it, Dumont said. Lips turn red for fall NEW YORK — After seasons of brown, purple, pink and nude lips, red lips are back. Intense red, to contrast with smoky eyes and to complement the rich colors and fabrics of fall clothes. Shades range from classic pure red to reds with a hint of blue or wine. "Lips are the statement makers of the fall season," said Jose Parron, the makeup director of Barneys New York. From Wire Service Reports RA1PH WEIGH Bonds - Insurance Phone 827-2906 115 East Iron m Html Ira ta*0 Frm* EcMitMte* Toll free 1-888-825-5280 UOOW.GrandBldg.I Salina, KS (913)825-5280 INTERNET & E-MAIL ON YOUR TV? Mid-Kan Internet, Inc. 1911 S. Ohio - Saline Int*rnet*1.0* 7 (<Wjtl M ID-KAN Per Month »\ INTERNET INC. •Requires Terminal & Internet Account Some qualifications apply Computer Not Required For more Info Call Terminals Available *$100 Rebate 825-1581 Iktobcrfcstlays October 10, 11 & 12 Too long 'til next year's Smoky Hill River Festival? Missing those great Bratwursts and Kraut? Jo^n the Salina German/American Club at the Smoky Hill Vineyards and Winery's 3rd Annual Qptobwfest and savor those flavorful brats]*, Profits, from brat sales, to benefit Susie Vanderford's bionic hand fund. NewtoivTactory 3 Outlet Stores BIG DAYS! Oct. llth, 12th & 13th 9 am-8 pm Monday-Saturday, 11 am-6 pm Sunday COME AND SEE! Saturday, October 11th 12:00 to 3:00 Classic Chevy Club 12:00 to 3:00 Remote with Dennis Kinkaid of KEYN 1:00 to 3:00 Rinky Dink the Humor Technician (clown) Sunday, October 12th 1:00 to 3:00 Meet the Wichita Thunder Players and Thunder Dog 1:00 to 4:00 Rinky Dink the Humor Technician (clown) 1:00 to 5:00 Rick White (Character Artist) 7pc. STAINLESS STEEL TOOL SET $14.9? HONG KONG GARDEN NEW KIDS'MEAL!! Make Your Own Plate: 1. Choice of Chicken Fried Rice or Chicken Lo Meln 2. Choice of an Egg Roll or 2 Crab Rangoon 3. Small Drink 4. Fortune Cookie OMLY $1.S> + TAX: No Substitutions GIBSON HALLOWEEN TABLEWARE 2/11.50 OR >»l BACH DRESS BARN /DRESS BARN WOMAN AU.SWBATORS BUT ONI, GOT THE SBCOND $«% QfP BUGLE BOY BNTIRK STORK (EXCLUDING OUTERWEAR) BIG DOG SPORTSWEAR FLEECE SALE ONE 1/1 OS® MEN'S WRINKLE FREE BOTTOMS Factory Brand Shoes) REEBOK MEN'S & Brand Name Shtti for Uii WOMEN'S F2 COMFORT WALKER $39.99 s*% ore EKCOSSKQffP BAKERS SECRET BAKEWARE OPEN STOCK BAKEWARE SALE PRICED AS MARKED CHILDREN'S' WEAR - imorosnmeraas Ever Eaten A Beer? ..Buy three, get one FREE II you've never eaten a Bear Iran Rocky Mountain Chocolate Factory, you've been hibernating too long. What's a Bear? If our name lor an unbearably decadent treat ol thick carame and nuts smothered In creamy chocolate. And If you buy three, we'll give you the fourth one absolutely (real So, get out ol youVS cave and come down lor a Bear today. Newton Factory Outlet Stores •Enplres 1/31/96. JBOrte Outlet BUY ANY TAPE OR CO AT REGULAR PRICE (OF EQUAL OR LESS VALUE) VIDEO'S EXCLUDED LINEN BARN SHEET SETS 200 COUNT TWIN $&«»$$ FULL$2«»$$' QUEEN fatJft KING $$».»$ BRIDAL REGISTRY AVAILABLE • (316) 283-9535 RED TAB JEANS 2 FOR (EXCLUDING DENIM) Samsonite SALE $49.99 Uprights-Pullmans Commuter Carry-ons Duffels and Boarding Bags Select group of assorted styles to choose from. Values up to $100 CORNING REVERE FACTORY STORE PYREX PIE PLATES 2 TOR $**t<& SAV1 U» TO> W ^^P^H^^^^^^F^B^^HPVMnMnHi^MrVB LONDON FOG • Outlet Store S»v« $1® off on any purchase of $99 or more Present this coupon at the time of your purchase. This cannot be combined with any other coupon otter. Coupon expires 7/31/98. Pfaltzgraff 2nd Quality ,99 * $2*99 Wicker I$% off LINGERIE DEPOT 2S% OFF SELECT ITEMS vrrflmin WOfllff COLLOlDALMINettAL SOURCE •GINKO BH.00A •S»TA»WBTS •90 MILLIGRAMS fl.Jf REG. $2.99 LIMIT 2 PER CUSTOMER & WHILE SUPPLIES LAST Anniversary Special: • 2 slices and a , • small drink for ' Outlet Store NEW MILLENNIUM NON-STICK 10 QT. STOCK POT-REO. SPECIAL PURCHASE>$4)$«$$ @ OUTLETS ONLY WHILE QUANTITIES LAST PUBLISHERS W BOOKS FOR LESS SELECT NOVELS 4 FOB KRICKETS SELECT SUMMER? APPAREL ; HARBOR VIEW MINIATURE GOLF Of* BUY ONE GET ONE FREE ON I BUMPER CARS OR CAROUSED RUE 21 7»% ore SUMMER CLOTHES COME & CHECK IT OUT

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