The Tipton Daily Tribune from Tipton, Indiana on June 7, 1935 · Page 8
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The Tipton Daily Tribune from Tipton, Indiana · Page 8

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Tipton, Indiana
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Friday, June 7, 1935
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Page 8
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Township Sunday ool Convention at New Lancaster Sunday. PUBLIC is INVITED The Madison township Sunday School convention will be held . Sunday afternoon at 2:00 o'clock | cash - Mr ; 1V ' T - V lmlsl 1H1 - V at the New Lancaster Christian church and the general public is Invited. HIGH ALIMONY. Indianapolis Capitalist Ordered to raj- The convention will open with Indianapolis, June 7. — Mrs. Norman A. Perry, wife of the owner of the Indianapolis baseball club, yesterday was granted an absolute divorce from her husband and $205,000 alimony by Special Judge Fred C. Uiiii.se n> .superior court. Airs. iV'rry also was granted custody oi a son, Norman A. I'erry, Jr., -0 years old. Judge Gause also ordered .Mr. Perry to pay foes totaling $20,ouu to attorneys for his wife in the divorce action. Mrs. Perry hud asked alimony of $1,000,000. In addition to the $205,000 his wife, and the attorney fees, he also was ordered to pay $2,GGG.6r> lo Mrs. Perry for expenses incurred in Tit SEEN LAVAL mm filing the divorce suit congregational singing "followed | aild S 1 -""" j " ^'l'!""' 1 »>»»«>• lll:l1 by the invocation and special mu- j already had been approved by the sical numbers will precede the ad- l ' otlrt dress to be delivered by Rev. H. M. Thrasher, pastor of the Atlanta Methodist church. Reports or the nominating committee and the secretary will be given following the address and election of officers held. Special instrumental and vocal numbers will feature the excellent program arranged for this meeting and all of the county officers are expected to be present. The convention will award a flag to the Sunday school of the township having the largest representation present and practically all of the Sunday schools will have a part in the program, which is open to the~public. Indiana Bankers Pass Resolutions .on the Federal Situation. STRIKE CENTRAL BANK Indianapolis. June 7. — Public officials were called upon yesterday by tho Indiana Hankers' Association to abandon as rapidly as possible emorj. r eney measures set up (luring the last two three last Satnr som had dom. ieen paid tor his free- 1 D1E1> FROM POISON. Frank L. Roissner, Father of Mrs. Harrison Smit-soii Succumbed. In Frank L. Reissner, for many years secretary of the Indianapolis school board, died at the Methodist hospital in Indianapolis Thursday night from .blood poisoning starting .from puncturing the palm of his right hand with a lead pencil. The injury was sustained Saturday morning in his office, and j was considered of little importance. Sunday his hand and arm began to swell and Tuesday his condition- became such that he was taken to the hospital. Wednesday night he appeared bet- er and it \fas believed the poison lad been Qhecked, but Thursday or j afternoon lils son-in-law, Harrison years neeause '"the period of 'c; m jt son ency has largely passed." the n solutions adopted at Says They Hamper His Ef forts to Form a Strong Police Force. STRONG VERBAL BLAST Political Crisis Ends for a Time With Formation of New Cabinet. VAXXUYS BACK IIOMK. CHANGE IN ENGLAND • he close of the thirty-ninth annual convention in tho Claypool holel, tlif bankers demanded the hulam-ing of the national budget as soon as possible and abolition of the posial savings system in communities having dopusit-in- sured banks. The bankers declared they strongly oppose all provisions of the proposed federal a-ct which j "threatens tho existence and Per-| i earnc( | received a telephone message from his wife, who was j at the hospital, that the attending physicians gave but little hope for his recovery. Mr. Roissner 'was born in Indianapolis 72; years ago and for 42 years was secretary of the Indianapolis school board, being personally acquainted with more school teachers than any other man in Indianapolis and perhaps the state, i No funeral arrangements were the ing. P.M "a. ion- of the |, U ], pendent I been arrang ^ ear , prW banking" and "the independence ; of the several slates in the rrea- linn and supervision of stale banking institutions." Changes in the federal rrservo ict were branded as "ruvoliition- iry and transcend tho fiindamenr.- "c***!!^ \Vagiiif; Fight Against Ousting of Veteran Democrats. Paris, Jjino 7 new .roali- il theories on which the federal reserve system is based." Passag.? jof the measure, it was declared, would "make the federal reserve lion cabinet was finally forme:! I system completely subservient to early today by Pierre Laval aft'.'r Indianapolis, June 7. — Fred-la two-day crisis alarmed the m.i- 'erick VanNuys. senior t'nite.l! jority of tl States senator from Indiana, returned to Hoosier soil yesterday •determined to open the councils of Indiana democracy for "his I chamber of deputies into promising support. the domination of any political Mr. Reissner is survived by the widow and .three children, a son Frank L. Reissner, Jr., and Mrs. Louis S. He'nsley of Indianapolis, and Mrs. itarrison Smitson nf Tipton. He .leaves two sisters, Mrs. Albert Brandt and Miss Emma Reissner of Indianapolis, and three grandchildren. He was a .memher of the Christian Science! church. Mystic Tie administration which may at any Lodge ' F ' & ' A - lM " of Indla'napo- aud would' 1 ' 8 ' * lle In dianapolis Mannerchor 'and the Athenaeum. The home is lime be ill amount to the hral bank. The swarthy. r.2-year-nld Auv- Expressing the belief that Ruar- ergnat completed his govern- anty of bank deposits is not n * hind of Democrats." Senator VanNuys will four days in Indianapolis in an effort to break down the lines of the present state organization ~an^ see that some of the "old- timers" of the party have a voice in "shaping the policies-and naming the leaders' of Indiana democracy. Senator VanNuys minced no •words in announcing the piirpos^ tot ihis visit. "I propose to see that my kind of Democrats have a voice in -Shaping the policies and naming •the leaders who will have to carry on the fight in the oncoming eUctlon." Senator VanNuys said. •Virtually throwing down the. .gauntlet to Governor Paul V. Mc- ment lineup to the echo of strident shouts of Royalists — "th; king's henchmen"—clashing repeatedly with gendarmes in the boulevards. Three persons were injured in disturbances accompanying the crisis, as the Royalists stage.1 their street demonstrations and taxpayers held 'protest meeting-- London, June 7.—A new cabinet, with Stanley Baldwin at ltd hUm, will take over the governing «of Great Britain today—unless all predictions go astray. Prime Minister Ramsay MacDonald will call at liuck'nighapi palace to resign the oflirp he has held since I!i2!> and Itnldwin. now JJntt, with whom the senator said| lord l irpsii . dl>nt <)f "'^ counril and le has had no "break." VanXuys i loador of llu ' Conservative party. asserted he was bore to "assert the desires" of his friends who complete cure for the ills of banking, the resolutions indorsed tho provisions of pending legislation to limit to S5.000 the amount ot the maximum insurance protection. Election of officers elevated n. D. Mitchell, president of the Union IJank and Trust Company of Kolcomo. to tho presidency of th'-j association. WKVERHAKfSKR CASE. Postal Workers Could Identify Mailer of Hansom Demand.- jwill take his place. It will not bo long, •have been ruled out of the party's councils in recent months. Senator VanNuys voiced an anxiety to •cooperate to thp fullest extent -with the , state administration in Obtaining allotment of federal foods and federal aid in the present economic crisis. Elaborating on bis statement -that he was here to s^e that "bis •kind of Democrats" obtain more Teoognition from the present organization. Senator Van- political quarters predicted last night, until the veteran MucDnuald. stanch champion of the cause of prar° and erstwhile Laborito together. is out al- irndor Observation. Thomas K. Dean, well known! resident of Windfall, entered the Methodist hospital at Indianapolis Thursday and will be there for a week under observation and explained that "his kind of j treatment. Mr. Dean has not been -Democrats" were "the old-time j in SooA health for some time and ^Democrats who hove fought un-1 a complete checkup will be made ..•elflshly for more than a quarter while he is in the hospital. He is in room A-238 and the Tipton Daily Tribune will go to him daily and keep him advised as to happenings in the county, during his absence. Taooma, Wash., June 7.—Two Tacoma postal workers believe they can identify the man 1 who mailed the George Weyerhaeuser ransom note, it was learned last night, as Federal authorities released descriptions the 9-year- old kidnap victim gave them of the house where he was held. At the same time it became known known that Federal men were carrying photographs of suspected persons. Floyd E. Baker, one of the em- j ployes, told newspaper men that I the day of the kidnaping he sold .•U 3!)25 Nopth Delaware street, Indianapolis. FEDERAL FLOOD TO STATE Evansville, June 7. — A blast directed atj his political enemies to whom he referred 'only as "those gentlemen" was unloosed by Al G. Fpeney, state director of public safety, in address before the Indiana Association of Chiefs of Police here yesterday afternoon. ! "When I: took office it was my intention to remove the state police system; from politics," Feeney said, "but I received hints that although politics had been successfully removed from the departments |n Massachusetts and Pennsylvania it wouldn't do in Indiana." j For the ipast two years, ha said, because he has fought against the, intrusion of politics, the newspapers from time to time ha.ve hinted that he was to be removed. ''These rumors don't bother me," he said, "but they do ruin the morale of the department and rob it of some of its efficiency. The battle against criminals and crooks is a big job but a bigger fight is that against self-seeking; politicians." He said attacks on him were inspired notjbecause he had failed his duty butj becausb he had "refused to* cooperate." After his; talk, a motion was made from the floor that the secretary be directed to write a letter to Governor McNutt asking Feeney's retention as safety director, but jt was withdrawn on the plea of j Feeney who said it might embarrass both himself and the governor. Indiana Is in Line for Several Millions for Use in This Work. Report Quintuplets. Madrid, Jjine 7. — Authorities investigated reports yesterday that quintuplets yrere born to a mother in the Layapies section, one of the poorest neighborhoods of the capital. Current reports said the five children! came into the Avorld without medical assistance and are thriving; PERU WOULD BENEFIT K, jpl* century, through lean years, for the good of the party." Want Ads Get Results. » '.'i.'.'t ut i. THE NEW 'ess BUILT FOB COMFORT, J&BILITYAND ITIKUOUS . Guaranteed I Mattress Little WEATHER — Generally fair tonight and Saturday; warmer Saturday and in central and north portions late tonight. a special delivery stamp to a man who placed it on an envelope marked "urgent-urgent." These words were typed across the envelope which carried the $200,000 ransom demand to Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Weyerhaeuser Jr., parents of George, who was held nearly eight days. Baker said he called the man's attention to the fact that the letter would require an additional 2 cents postage for city delivery. "I don't think it will," he said the man replied. The letter received by the Weyerhaeusers had, f Q f levees j reconatructlon O f bridges and •channel improve- PISH FRY TONIGHT. At the Friendly Inn in Sharpsville, managed by Dolly and .Perl; good music; you are welcome. c-212 ICE For Refrigeration ISeetheNEW AIR CONDITIONED REFRIGERATORS At Low Prices and Eaay Terms __ .. f -- „, . * .. t- *• only the special delivery stamp upon it. By the time a boy had dei llvered it officers were at the' house and seized the message before payment of the 2 cents due. Fred P. Schaller, the other postal employe, saw the , man when he walked to his window, next to Baker's, where the mall- ing slots are located. George's description ot the place he was held as a "gray house with two gabies," was disclosed by Federal agents yesterday in telling new steps by the boy to help them track down' 'the abductors. Whether the house was a two- s^ory~strn9ture or one of the bungalow I type, the hoy did not know* Its location is still unknown to 'the army of searchers who hay» ^-^- "woode Washington, June 7. — Indiana's participation in flood control expenditures proposed in the bill reported favorably by the house flood . control committee yesterday was estimated by Representative Griswold (D.-Ind.) at 39,723,598. ' Griswold said the committee hopes to obtain the funds to carry out the public works administration, if. not through a direct grant. The largest individual allotment proposed for Indiana would go to Peru, for bridge changes, a flood wall and levees on the Wabash river. } Other expenditures proposed in the bill for the Wabash are 1,800 at Delphi for levees and $205,000 for levees and bridge reconstruction at Wabash. | Near Indianapolis the two largest projects !are the Fall creek section of the west fork of WHlte river, where j $540,000 Is allowed ments and at the Warflelgh section of the river where posed for a west fork of Whlto $1,020,000 Is pro- similar prorgram. • Logansport is tEe only city where an Appropriation :was allowed for th J constructlpn of intercepting sewers. • On the wef t fork of White riyor the committee.also allowed $127,000 for drainage Improvements, levees and flood vails at Anderson and 1840,000 for bridge changes land channel Improve- property ments for piotection to lit Muncle. I On the Jover Wabaahithe committee allow id, among 1 others, 137,5001. for! levees at Terra gtontoj 1 ia6.'">0 tor, livees' at • -••- Remains Very 111. i Mrs. Anna Behymer, who has been confined to her bed at her home on Cdurt street for many weeks, remains seriously ill there being little gain. She Is very weak from her long confinement in bed and sleeps much of the time. John Barrymore r ohn Barrymore, star of stage and ?rcen, shown aboard his yacht, :fanta,' on arrival in Havana, uba, denied knowing anything of -he divorce action filed by his wife, Dolores Costello. One of the yachting party was Elaine Barrie, young actress with "whom Bariymore has been seen frequently of late. HOGS AGAIX HIGHER. Advance of lOc Registered at Indianapolis Friday. Indianapolis, June 7. — Receipts on hogs. 4,000: held over. 210; 'cattle. 300; calves, COO; sheep and lambs, 1.200. Hog prices early today in the local live stock market were generally lOc higher, with the top, $10.10 ifor best selections; pigs and light weights, up to 160 pounds, sold at $8.50 to $9.75; 100 to 275 pounds,, $9.90 to $10; 275 pounds up, $9.70 to $9:85; sows, $8.50 to $9.60. Cattle trading was slow at barely steady : prices; calves were steady at $9.50 down, and spring lambs were 50c higher, at $10.00 down, fed lambs, $7.75 down. Chicago, June 7. — Receipts on hogs, 9,000, including 6,000 direct to packers; held over, 2,000; the market opened steady, Dearly top $10.00; cattle, (2,000; sheep and lambs, 10,000. SUITE & BARRUM LEAVELL& BATES LOANS Citizens National Rank Bid*. Fhone !«. ; Yo s Paraffin Oil For Oiling Floors — and — ! Polishing .Furniture OIL CO. EIAVOOD MARKET Phone 53. I. DUFFEY & SONS CO. No Commission - No Yardage Elwood, June 7. — Hogs, 160 to ISO Ibs., $9.85; ISO to 200 Ibs., $9.80; 200 to 225 Ibs., S9.65; 225 to 250 Ibs., $9.70; 250 to 275 IDS., $9.65; 275 to 300 Ibs., $9.60; 300 to 325 Ibs., $9.50; sows, $8.75 down; calves and lambs Wednesday and. Thursday. Local Uraln Market Wheat, No. 2, 74c; Not 1 75c Oats : 29c Corn, per 100 Ibs. _ $1.10 Local Produce Market. (Moore & Moore) Eggs, per dozen 19c > Indianapolis Produce Prices. Eggs—Indianapolis jobbers offer country shippers (or strictly fresh stock, 19c at country- points, 20c delivered at Indianapolis. Poultry — Jobbers paying for heavy hens, 16c; Leghorns;- 15c; broilers, 2 Ibs. up, 17c; Leghorns, 2 Ibs., 16c; -cocks and stags, 7c; geese, 5c; ducks, 7c; guineas, 15c. Butter—Jobbers' selling prices for creamery butter, .fresh firsts, No. 1, 27-28c; No. 2, 25-26c; in quarters a*d halves. Ic more. Butter Fat—Buyers -paying 22c a pound delivered at Indianapolis. Moore's Market Groceries—Meats 130 — Phones — 27 Kf . If Yoi ISleetf • . Vacation Fujnds . :. - I '•• I I' • 'I? I'- M i LL Don't let the state of your finances interfere with your summer's pleasure. Don't deprive yourself of the good times you should have, merely because of, temporary shortage of funds. You can do what you want—have the most glorious vacation ever —-and pay for it in a simple, easy, convenient way. Leavell 6-Bates Tipton, Ind. Phone 16 Saturday Special Formerly Priced $4.95 and $5.95, Reduced to $2.75 $3.75 Attention! You who want fine quality well made silks. They are in all colors, from ~:...L.l shades to navy blue. A new collar is just what you need to completely change that dress. A large assortment of new styles, just in- Regular price 98c; Saturday only, 75c. ; | formerly Priced $1,00 Reduced to '•. ' 89c Washington Maid stockings; you .will like i th'e smooth, dull finish and the beauty of the silk;! -arid with a weather eye to your budget, you'll appreciate this reduced #rice; satisfaction guaranteed.! Phone 182 39 E. Jeffersori Stj. ii •• Ql Hennery Browttir -------- ^ Hennery White --------- 3D*: Pints ---------------- 18c" POULTRY Hens 15c? Hens, Leghorn ------- ' — tile Boosters _____________ i 7o : We Oafl for Tour PaOtXy at Xbese Price»-)£c Store M ~ ' DeUveredl , widi Ivory soap and water. "T* rrpp-i f^n - : - r" p rr WHAT_A BIG JOB IT DOES AND HOW EASILY ... Burdsal-s Luster-Low in- I 1 | • I j ' \ ! I tenor finish gives you a beautiful, uniform luster- - '•& rf?. 'i l^tli I ' 1111 , ! no bright spots {here and dull, spots j there. Easy toj apply,—leaves nib bn e h marks. Actually wasriable—dirt; grea s;, ink and pencil niarlis can be remo>ejc!

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