Alton Evening Telegraph from Alton, Illinois on July 7, 1958 · Page 3
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Alton Evening Telegraph from Alton, Illinois · Page 3

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Alton, Illinois
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Monday, July 7, 1958
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Page 3
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MONDAY, JULV 7, 1858 ALTON EVENING TELEGRAPH PAGETHftER Brighton Guild Plans Retreat BRIGHTON - The Women' Guild of the St. John Evangel leal, and Reformed Church ar planning «. spiritual tetre'a Thursday at Rock Spring Par! in Alton. Cars will be leaving th church at 10 a.m. The Brighton women will be joined by the Al ton E^& R. Guild. Stanley Wilkie of Eden Sem inary. St, Louis, will be speake and his talk will be on "Mission In Africa." The women will hav a sack lunch at noon. fish fry Nets $4* BRIGHTON-The two Brighton Bantam Khoury teams playec ball here July 4 following a fisl fry which netted the two team $20 each. Sam Cardinal manages the No 1 Bantam team and Mayor Eu gene Bott the No. 2 Wildcats The No. 1 team defeated the No 2 team, 13 to 8. Sputniks Win BRIGHTON —The Sputniks o the 7-9 Khoury league defeatec the Tigers 94 here Saturday This was the first loss—for th Tigers. The Sputniks have woi five and lost four. Cairns pitched for the winner with Aldridge doing the catching Watts pitched for the losers wit! Oltman behind the bat. America's first schoolboy safet patrol originated in Columbus Ohio. /Ditp0M»r Trash / M<| Garbage \lmlda Your HWM( »-«.«. .-•••~~-~—.—' OtaRin RomiinG tiff INCINERATOR Quick Burns BOTH Gatkaqe nnd Tiosli! • FIREBRICK LINING (Won't RIM! or tor* Outn • PORCELAIN FINISH • URGE CAPACITY • AMERICA'S TOP SELLING GAS MCINERATOR V. W stand fish Betsey Ann Chairmen Appointed BRlGHTON-Harold Bott, pres ident of the Betsey Ann Picnic Association, announced today names of chairmen appointed for the annual picnic to be held Friday and Saturday, July 25 and 26. They are: concessions: James Hughes, Albert Oertei, Carl Col' lins; burgoo: Ralph Haycraft and Leland Schroeder; soda: Newel' Strohbeck; confectionery: Mr and Mrs. Harris Cafr and Reid Crowder; games: B. H. Scheffei John Jones, and John Long; lights: Claud McAfee and Donald Snell; police and parking: Elmer Bott; grounds and water Schroeder; sandwich Bruce and Allen Hanold; stand: John Ash, Marvin Powel and Albert Oertei; Signs: Harry Rondy; dinner Calvin Vonnahmen; policing grounds: Cub Scouts^^Monday morning clean-up: FrTnk Schroeder; burgoo tables: Lloyd Well and Aurellia Well; entertainment Ed Polster and V. W. Schroeder advertising: William Thyer, John Ash, and Ed Polster; and soliciting: Mrs. Ruth Reynolds, town and Mrs. Lewis Schlief, country. Officers of the association are Harold Bott, president; John Ash first vice president: Ralph Hay craft, second vice president; Bruce Hanold, treasurer; Lev Maher, secretary and V. W Schroeder, custodian of ground; and equipment. Directors of the association are: Carl Collins, Reid Crowder Donald Werts, Edward Polster Leland Schroeder, William Thyer A. A. Moehle, and Alvin Schroeder. Finn Awarded BRIGHTON — The St. Paul Metlmdiht Sunday School award ed perfect attendance pins during the Sunday School hour Sunday. Recipients were: Mary Jean Swan, 16 years; Carol Mae Well 15 years; Becky Swan, 14 years; Shirley Burk, 11 years; Steven Schallenberg, 8 years; Marsha Well, 7 years; Donna Williamson, 6 years; Judy Lee, Monty Stubblefield, Jeff Blumstein and Charles Blumstein, 1 year; Bobby Seaman, Becky Seaman, Terry Bolin, and Dean Ohlmeyer, six months; Terry Robinson, Dennis Robinson, Jerry Robinson and Jerry Bowman, three months. Royal Neighbors to Meet Brighton — The Royal Neighbors will meet Tuesday evening at 8 o'clock in the home of Mrs. Harold Bott on Vine street. Scrap Containers BRIGHTON — Cub Scouts of Pack 39 have placed four yellow trash containers in the Junior High school yard. Printed on the containers are the words: "don't be a litter bug,"'hoping everyone will cooperate in keeping the school yard cleared of waste papers and cartons. Rod and Gun Club to Meet BRIGHTON —The Tri County Shop Mon. Nite Till 9 MONDAY SPECIALS ON SALE MONDAY 5 TO 9 Ladies' Baby Doll PJ.'s 1.29 Value Plain colored cotton plisse with luxury nylon net , trims. Midriff top is elas ticized ot neck ond waist. . S-M-L sizes. ••y't Kntt ihlrt 0»y Blazer Stripe Patterns l.lf Boy'i Cool Play Shortf 77' Vtlut 77' Comfortable Fraternity Prep ribbed crew neck shirt. In waihtast, combed cotton. Sizes 12 through 16. Buy now. Sanforized (max shr. 1%) cotton play shorts In gabardines, crash linens, seersuckers. Latest color*. Sixes 440. VOW HONEY I4CK- ALTON Mill 8 Minor Fires Are Reported Over Weekend Three calls to minor fires and one inhalator call comprised the score for Alton Fire Department over last weekend. At 12:58 p.m. Saturday, No. t Company responded with the inhalator to the Thomas Sandidge residence, 203 W. 13th St. Mr. Sandidge had been moved hy ambulance to St. Joseph's Hospital where he was pronounced dead. Earlier, Nos. 1 and 2 had investigated a rubbish blaze near Gospel Tabernacle, Spring street and Quincy court, at 10:32 a.m. Saturday. At 3:58 p.m. Saturday, No. 4 company extinguished an atitr carburetor flash fire at Main street and College avenue. Owner of the car was listed as Lcroy Emmons, Cottage Hills. Nos. 1 and 3 companies at 10:18 p.m. Sunday extinguished a carburetor flash fire in the automobile of Steve Muscarella, 611 Emerald St., when the vehicle was at Third and Piasa streets. Damage to wiring, the carburetor and paint on the hood was extensive, said Assistant Chief Warren Grable. Etdrod ELfiftED -* lihe Household Science Club was entertained • Thursday afternoon at the home of Mrs. Charles King with 12 members present. Roll call was "Opportuni ties of an American Citizen". Papers read were: "Drama of Vincennes" by Mrs. William Ivers and! "Accidental Fourth" by Mrs. Dav id King. Prizes for games played were won by Mrs. L. T. Whiteside, Mrs. Irl Davidson, Mrs. Jesse Davidson and Mrs. Dean Bushnell. The next meeting will be at KANE—Mrs. Mary L. Kraus haar, Alton, spent Friday with her sister, Mrs. VV. H. Brady. In the evening Mr. and Mrs. Brady and their guest were supper guests of Mr. and Mrs. VV. M. Brady. Guests Friday of Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Bates were Mr. and Mrs. Delbert Williams and children, Mrs. Russel Williams of E. St Louis, Mrs. Jessie Williams White Hall, and Mr. and Mrs. Neal Hawkins, Godfrey. Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Trump and children, Mr. and Mrs. Billy Witt spent Friday at the letter's club house near Nutwood. Mr. and Mrs. Winfred Baugh and Miss Helen and Miss Mary Rue of Dow were guests Friday of Mr. and Mrs. E. I. Ozbun. Warren Greene entered Jersey Hospital Friday for observation and treatment. Mr. and Mrs. Lynn Cochran and children of Alton visited Friday with Mrs. Cochran's mother, Mrs. C. E. Hutchens. Mrs. Richard Carr and children and Mrs. Kentner Crotchet* and children of Bethalto visited Friday with their mother, Mrs Ross Crotchet!, Mrs. Henry Roewe. Miss Marie Roewe, and D. J. Calvey of Alton were dinner guests Friday of Mr and Mrs. Harry DeShasier. Rod and Gun Club monthly meeting is scheduled for Tuesday evening at 8 p.m. at which time a special vote is to be taken. All members are urged to be present. Brighton Notes BRIGHTON — Mr. and Mrs. George Brown and daughter, Cindy, of Chicago, were weekend visitors of Miss Anne Blodget. Saturday evening Mr. and Mrs Brown, and Miss Blodget accompanied Mr. and Mrs. Sam Cardinal to St. Louis to the opera. Miss Phoebe Andrews visited during the weekend with Mrs Gilson Brown in Alton. Mrs. James Weiss and children, Dana, Nancy, Jan, and Robin, of Walnut Grove, 111., visited Sunday with Mr. and Mrs Harold Bott and also attended the Methodist Church morning service. The Rev. Weiss was a former pastor here and is attending summer school at Ames, Iowa. the home of Mrs. L. T. Whiteside, 1 July 17. .* Miss Janet Roster is visiting at Elkvitle as a guest of Miss JoAnn Moore. Mr. and Mrs. Donald Camcrer and family.of Fitchberg, Mass., are visiting relatives here. , Mrs. Douglas Brannan and daughter of'Columbia. Mo., spent the weekend with her parents, Mt. and Mrs. Sam Camerer. Nearly two million people visit the Black Hills National Forest every year. Car Hits State Hospital Fence COTTAGE HILLS—A car driven by James Coffman, ForRst Homes, who was travelling north on Stanley Road, wp.nt out o{ control, i crossed to the other sidp of thp road and ran into a fence nn the Alton State Hospital grounds at the entrance of Stanley Ave. at 3 a.m. Saturday. Deputy Sheriff Lee Moss investigated and reported the accident. To VMt Enropw COTTAGE HILLS-The Rev. Ed-1 gar Croll. pastor of Concordiaj Lutheran Church, will fly to Paris) on July 20 for a 21-dajr European tour. He will visit the Brussels World Fair, and will also visit friends at Headquarters U.S.A.R.E.U.R.. an air base at Heidelberg. Germany. More than 1,000 Africander cattle have died within the last year around Rustenburg, South Africa, from eating poison plants. Greenfield Woman's Brother Succumbs GREENFIELD — Mrs. Frank Parks received word Saturday of the death of her brother, Louis Dollinger, in Champaign. Mr. Dollinger, who observed his 71sl birthday June 11, died suddenly following a heart attack. He had visited frequently at the Parks home. Woodhnrit First city to havp a public defender was Los Angeles, Calif., where one was appointed in 1914. Notfeft WOO&BUftN - Mrs. LafchW Heal returned Wednesday tram A visit with her son, Lt. Earl Heal, Dover, Del. Mfs. Leonora Elliott and Miss Lillian Elliott have returned-from a visit at Wftiter Haven, Fla., with Mr. and Mrs. Roy Hancock. The new Havana (Cuba) Hilton Hotel, 30 stories and 630 rooms, has almost doubled that city's firstclass tourist accommodations. OPEN MONDAY NIGHT 'TIL 9! TREMENDOUS JULY * A*,Wk £u1*^ A***.** NO MONEY DOWN! pay as little as 4 a month save on mens wear save on fabrics TAKE 10 MONTHS TO PAY ON OUR C.C.A.PLAN Open a convenient "C.C.A.* Continuous Credit Account And do all your shopping everyday without cash. •ik any *0fe«per<on for o C. C. A. application CLEARANCE OF J WOMEN'S FASHIONS | 5 Big Groups! I WOMEN'S DRESSES I Hurry in for best choice of tome of our finest dresses! j Tailored, casual styles; solids, motif designs, and floral » l j patterns; Juniors, Misses, Women's sizes! ' Regular $6.98 Values ......$ 4.00 .*» *< Car Saving Call BARABOO, Wis. if— A flustered motorist at Devils Lake State Park got out o! a tough spot recently when two game wardens came along in a telephone-equipped car The motorist was stuck crossways on a park railroad track. A quick call to the nearest railroad station was .just in time to flag down a freight train. Who took tho button out of Mr. Murphy's hoarlng aid? SONOTONE D/D/Our«n«. ing eyeglMf model let* him hear with both e«r§ ... yet be we«ra nothing in either eiirl How ii it done . . . with no button, no cord, nothinu in either ear? The secret is the new binanral hearing method combined with Sonotone's originul bone-conduction invention. Mr. Murjjhy hear* all the •ounds around him the "natural" way - with both ear*. Yet everything is hidden in his good-looking glasses. Latest styles available now lor both men and women. COM! M. WON! 0« WMI SONOTONB OF AI.TON-WW fUdj. Phone 8.|7»« H«un » I* (MSat, 1 1« I. I*'I \i" i [l\> C* v *5 3 Regular $8.98 Values . . Reg. $10.98 - $12.98 Values Reg. $14.98 - $17.98 Values Reg. $17.98 - $22.98 Values WOMEN'S HOUSECOATS 'N ROBES Regular $5.98 values! Choose from good assortment of nylon or cotton in flower print design. Sizes 10-20. MISSES' RAINCOATS Regular $14.98 values. In quality poplin with matching hat. Suntan. Sizes 14-16-18 only. WOMEN'S FAILLE DUSTERS Regular $10.98 values! Clearance of fine quality dusters in aqua, beige, orchid. Sizes 12-18. Second Floor .$ 6.00 .$ 8.00 . $12.00 .$15.00 4.88 8.88 .§• ^\ «V I MORE FASHION SPECIALS! $ 1.44 88 3.33 MISSES' SPORTSWEAR Values to $2.98! Choose from shorts, Jamaica* and pedal pushers. Assorted colors and sizes. LADIES' COORDINATES Regular $16.98 values! Fine cotton tops with quilted skirts. sorted patterns. MISSES' SUMMER BLOUSES Regular $5.98 values! Some of our finer sportswear reduced for clearance. Ass't fabrics 'n sizes. MISSES' COTTON COORDINATES Values were to $8.98! Gay flowered patterns and bright new solid tones. fixes 10.18. Second Floor FASHION ACCESSORIES MISSES' SUN BRAS Regular values to $1.98! Assortment of plains and printed cotton styles. LADIES' STRAW BELTS Values to $2,00! First quality straw fabrics in sizes 24-21. Summer colors. MISSES' STRAW BAGS Regular $7.91 values! In tones of navy, black or natural ten, Final clearance! LADIES' SUMMER HANDBAGS Values to $4.911 Assortment of *«?% 4% f\ box, clutch «nd tote ityUs. Hurry in * J J M $ f * 1.00 5.99 for bait choice) Main Floor Check On Our Easy Credit/ MEN'S KNIT SHIRTS Values were regularly $2.98! Some Ivy styles in quality combed cotton knit. S-M-L MEN'S SPORT SHIRTS Regularly were $2.98! Famous name brand - in summer weights. Stripes, -solids, fancy motifs. S-M-L. $ 1.99 1.99 Values to $7.99 Pair! WASH. 'N WEAR SLACKS Easy care fabric, just wash, drip dry and wear. (Omit spin cycle.) Summer weights! 30-40. $ 5 MEN'S WALKING SHORTS Values to $4.98! Gay tartan plaids, Ivy stripes and cotton cord! Sizes 30.38! Main Floor * $ 3.99 save on boys wear BOYS' SPORT SHIRTS Regular $1.79 values! Choose gay assortment of stripes, plaids, some wash 'n wear. 6-16. BOYS' WALKING SHORTS Regularly sold for $1.98! All first quality fabric. Tartan plaids and solids. 6-18. Main Floor $ $ 1.50 1 save on lingerie NYLON WALTZ GOWNS Regular $5.98 values! Fancy lace trim, in 100% nylon! Broken sizes, 32-38. DACRON BLENDED HALF SLIPS Normally sold for $1.69! Fine dacron, cotton and nylon blend with fancy lace trim. M-L. 4.97 77 Values to $3.98 Each! ASSORTED LINGERIE Includes fine quality pajamas, long gowns, shorty gowns, and slips. Broken sizes. $ 1.47 Main floor save on hosiery NYLON STRETCH HOSE Regular $1.50 value! In fine 15 denier construction. In honey beige tones, S-A-T. MISSES' SOCKS Normally 59c pair! In soft spun cotton and stretch nylon, Ivory with (tripe top. 9-1 I, Main floor 99 44 save on cosmetics NUTRI-TONIC SHAMPOO! Regular $4.00 size! Full pound jar. t Creme base. 4 times $1.00 siiesl MAYNARDS HAND CREAM Normally $2.25! Reduced for clearance during this July event. For dry skin! Main floor 1.50 1.00 save on notions BEACH BAG 'N' PILLOW Regular $1.00 value! Ideal for beach, or outing! Handy carryall and pillow combination. MEN'S TROUSER CREASER Regularly tells for $1.00 pair! Adjust* able steel frame for quick drying. No ironing needed! C Pr. PRINTED PERCALE Regular 49c yard! Ideal for dresses, children's wear! All first quality. New patterns. 5 YARD DRESS LENGTHS Each one $3.99 value! Gay new fab- * 4^ «g ^^ 36 $3/19 3 YARDS 1.00 net in many widths. many patterns. save on girls wear GIRLS' SWIM SUITS Regular $2.98 values. Gay prints, sparkling solid colors. Assorted styles. 3-6X, 7-14. Values to 3.98! GIRLS' SUMMER DRESSES One group of fine cotton fabric dresses. Reduced for clearance.? *^% ^\ ^\ Select from dressy to casual styles. J ^f ^J Broken sizes. ^ m * ~ ~ Second floor save on domestics PASTEL PERCALE SHEETS Regular $3.59 value! Fine combed^, percale by famous manufacturer! Types) ISO thread. GOZA UTILITY MATS Regular $1.00 each! Woven matchstick type mat! Use for beach roll, shades or rug protector. Natural color. Third F loot 81x108 88 Regular 39c Values CANNON BATH TOWELS Soft, fluffy terry in bath size. Choose * pink, blue, yellow or green. Solid colors. 97 Main floor save on home-needs COTTON OR TAFFETA BEDSPREADS n* -T Normally sell for $7.98! In full or twin size. White ground with floral tern. Ruffle trim in solid color. READY-MADE DRAPERIES Regularly $7.98 pair! Solid colors with lurex stripe! Decorator shades. 45"x90". STAINLESS KITCHEN TOOLS Reg. $1.25 value! Choose spatulas, mixing spoons, turners. Black handles. Non-tarnish, non-rust. 4 CYCLE POWER MOWER Sells elsewhere to $1 19.95. 2'/4 H.P., recoil starter, 22" cut, Briggs-Stratton engine, offset wheels, alum, chassis. Basement 5.00 Pr. 1.00 $ 69 'nird f Jpor NEW SHIPMENT! U. S. KEDS $495 • BUCK • NAVY • CHINO WIDTHS N AND M "GRASSHOPPER"

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