The Tipton Daily Tribune from Tipton, Indiana on May 4, 1935 · Page 1
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The Tipton Daily Tribune from Tipton, Indiana · Page 1

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Tipton, Indiana
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Saturday, May 4, 1935
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Entered as second class matter, *¥3? Oct 4, ,1895, at post office! at Tlpton, Ind., under the act ot March 6, 1879 VOLUME XL, NO. 183. TIPTON, INDIANA, i SATURDAY EVENING, MAY 4,' WILL TEST THE LIQUOR LAW Roadhouse Owners Are Said to Have Formed.Associa- tion to Make Fight. MUST CLOSE JUNE 1st Japan Sends ISO Brides to, Seniors in Manchukoii Area Harbin, Manchukuo, May 4. —Little empire builders, parti-, .cipating in the extension of Japan's influence over Manchu- kuo, 130 Japanese girls in their teens and early twenties have left here to marry Japanese frontiermen they have never seen. The girls departed by a Sun- gari river steamer for the village of Chiluli, east, of Ilan, where several hundred armed Japanese soldiers have been established in a farming community. The hamlet, "capable of self-defense," is one of s£v- eral created to aid In holding northeastern ManchukHO under Japanese domination. Auxiliary of Oral Wisehart Post, Kempton, Sponsoring One May 9.. Many Operators Face Loss of Large Sums Invested in Their Places. Indianapolis, May 4.—Faced with the necessity of closing June 1, Indiana roadhouse owners are organizing a "protective association" to fight the new state liquor law, it was learned today. , The movement is state wide and each roadhouse operator is requested to pay a license fee of $25 to become a member of the organization', the United Press was told. Under the new law all roadhouses will be barred from selling liquor or beer after June 1. If their licenses extend beyond that date they will be given rebates by the state excise depart- | splelldid Mothers Day program to ment. j , le g j vpn Thursday evening. May Roadhouse owners in the larR- i9 ja tlle bageme nt of the Kemper counties are faced with the tou c i ir j at j an church. Invitations have been extended to ladies of all surrounding chapters,- and a number of the Tipton members are planning to be among those attending. The program will open at 7:30 o'clock with group singing -by the entire assemblage. Mrs. Frank Russell of this city will sing two solo numbers, followed by a reading and violin solo by Blanche Durgett. Mrs. Irene Fullerton of Huntington, district president, will be one of the outstanding speakers of the evening, taking as her subject, "Making Motherhood Safer for Mothers." Mrs. Zuma Mar- ALL CHAPTERS INVITED The Kempton American Legion Auxiliary is arranging for a loss of large investments. Their - '-Continued on Page 2. ILIAESS FATAK. Mrs. Helen (O'Mallry) Sprinpnaii Died at Home of Ptitlvrr. Mrs. Helen (O'Malley) Springman, daughter of John O'Malley residing northeast of Tipton died at the father's home shortly a/t<;r noon Saturday, death following u long battle for health" More than a year ago Mrs. Springman suffered an attack of nervous troubIS and a slight cerebral hemorrhage and early Saturday morning shy suffered another and more se- quis of Kokom0i district child wel- she her vere one. A doctor who was called gave no hope stating that she could not survive the day. The death of this splendid 'young woman is a matter of much regret to all and with the exception of a few years which lived In Indianapolis with husband Lee Springman all her Ufa. was spent here. Following the death the body was brought to the Young par- low tor preparation and will be Returned to* the home Saturday ! evening to He in state until the /idur of 'the service. ••''%•'-. Thei deceased was born in Tip- ; j|ojf;eounty 36 years ago northeast WILL OPPOSE AHEMP1 TO NAME Faces Chair for Wreck Deat& fare chairman, will talk on "Child Welfare,'' describing many of the problems and difficulties to be met and overcome in' this work. Mrs. Claudia Smith of the Beechwood hospital, will also deliver an interesting message on the subject, "What Constitutes Adequate Maternity Care." Mrs. Smith is a former Tipton county Red Cross nurse, and has recently added to the Beecbwood hospital a complete and modern maternity ward with every convenience for the comfort of the patients. All war mothers who can attend will be honor guests for the .-™*'Tipton. being one of several j evening, and every mother :ir«~- "Ihildren born to John and Sa-j 61 " w " receive special tr'bjta. brina (Tobin) O'Malley and was Tin general public Is cordlal'y in; .... -__ v-,, „» M,» st vl'ed to be present and eniov the life lonp member of the St. .-John's Catholic "church, being iibrmerly actively Identified with the" various departments of the chttrch. She was married to Lee Bprln*man About aeven years taking place at gt, John's church of Tipton. Hie husband is employed in • Indianapolis 'but has been spendlnf r«11- the time possible with jiif 3«if6 since her illness, besides the mother Mrs. t Harry Jo- idlng northeast of at the Pen- Store Iff Tipton jaret Rahe of Mun> ; Jmirvlved by one at home, and 'O'Malley. II >death occurred : and. one broth- her to the t * -* , splendid TJj an! splendid program An optimist Is a person who believes that if the League of Nations starts a war the world court could stop It. Oil Industry Drafts Program and Resolution to Present to Congress. NOT PUBLIC UTILITY Leaders Say Users Are Best Served by F:ee Compe- -tion in the Fields. (By United Press). Chicago. May 4.—The oil industry today announced a program vigorously opposing any efforts to establish a federal petroleum board classifying it as a public utility, but admitting a need for control of crude oil production . The program was drafted by 40 leading oil men, governor of the American Petroleum Institute, in an effort to harmonize attacks on the entire NRA oil code and a contention of producers that they have profited by federal and stale control. A lengthy resolution was prepared for submission to congress referring to the Thomas bill, for creation of a petroleum board as 'an economic strait jacket." "Any such economic strait jacket as is contained in senate bill 2445 or similar proposals for the enlargement of the NRA would serve to increase the price of gasoline and demoralize the industry," the resolution said. 'Users of petroleum are best served when competition is free, when the operation of economic law is unhampered and when the profit incentive stimulates Initiative and inspires invention The free operation of these forces inevitably tends to insure quality and reduce prices." Legislative uncertainties and threats of government-control are retarding progress in the industry, it was claimed. Citing a record of efficiency and cost cutting to consumers, the industry asserted its hands "should not be tied by governmental bureaucracy." The institute declared that, although It is a duty of oil producing states to prevent waste of crude oil, the responsibility does not justify attempts to make the industry a public utility "any more ttian In the case of any producer or manufacturer of a commodity in general use." "There should be no economic tinkering and no political control," the resolution to congress stated. "Unfortunately, governmental agencies ,once organized and endowed with some measure of authority, aspire to continue their existence and increase . their authority." The federal government, it was pointed out, should encourage and Continued on Page 2. Hubert LindMy—- Hubert lindsey, shown inset at the right yith his attorney during; Us trial at! Columbus, Oi, faces the electric jchair on a murder charge ta connection with the death of three mten killed in a train wreck last December for which the state claims Lindsey and two others i were responsible. FIELDi Motor Speedway Preparing for the AnnWl 500-Mile Classic May 30. FIRST PRIZE IS $10,000 Indianapolis, Ind., >lay 4.J— Nearly three score of ;the fleetest racing cars in the land are pointed towards a speedy treasure hunt here Miy 30. i i They are entered in the 23rd annual 500-mile race at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Decoration Day pid $100,000 jis to be the award' lor their roaring efforts. j | The entry list! has closed and 58 have elected themselves in the contest. Of this number onlyj the 33 fastest will start and ten of those lucky ones will participate In the big j purse. Elimination : trials to select the starting 33 will get under way May 18 and continue until two days before the big race. " i Veterans who have felt the thrill of victory before, ambitious Greatest War Armada Ever Assembled by United States During Time of Peace Probation Week to Be 0 Celebrated May 12 to 18 in I Many Cities. PROGRAMS ON THE AIR youngsters ; who their second or are making third attempt. newcomers with fresh laurels of dirt track achievements about their heads, are among those who seek lame and gold. Three former winners head the list of favorites.' Louis Meyer, quiet yqnng California pilot! who won both in 1928 and 193J3J may become! the winner of the racing classic. . Bill Cummings, last year's vlt- tor, may be the only driver to r become a I successive i winner. Popular Pete Dek'aolo, ; who set a trade reccird irl 1925 which stood for silt yet rs, Is attempting a come-back Washington, May 4. — The greatest fighting armada ever assembled ,by the United States in peace time f steamed northwestward yesterday for the navy's annual spring plowing of the oceans In maneuvers and fleet exercises. In these exercises, which will occupy about three weeks, the U, fl. fleet, break new ground. They will; be held in the huge triangle of ,[waters between .Pnget » »na Hawaii, with l^fiat the waterp of scene , of t&»< pletes a- project begun several years ago when the first maneuvers were held in the Pacific. At that time the scene was in the southern Pacific, not far-off the Panama canal. The object of the "attacking fleet" at that time was to break through the "defending fleet" and capture, or seriously damage, the Panama canal. The next year the maneuvers ware moved to the Hawaiian Island*, the object ot the attaok-by tb**M«ok Heat" In't packing all of Mrs. Nellie Blye Tyner, county probation officer nnd chairman of the district probation organization, which recently held a splendid meeting at the First Presbyterian church, has received do tails of the state-wide celebration of .'probation week. May 1218. | Governor Paul V. McNutt will open the air program Sunday night May 12 at 10:00 and Mrs. Tyner states that every radio-stain Indiana has granted time to speakers. Speakers for Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday nights, May 13, 14 and 15 are Francis ID. McCabe, director of probation: Attorney General Philip Lutz.jJr.; Dr. Murray De Armond, noted psychiatrist; Honorable Deivey E. Meyers judge of municipal court three of Indianapolis. ! On Friday night May 16, at 9:45 a play "Joe Martin," will be presented over the network of stations | by the ; Civic Theater players of Indianapolis. Mrs. Tyner states that- during the weej; of May. 12-18 the National Probation Association will have a display at the L. S. Ayres store in jlndianapqlis which every one vlsitfng In the city during ttie week should see. !. [ During the past year 3,941 delinquency cases were disposed:of by the various probation organizations o|f the state. Of that number 2,790 were boys and 1,151 girls. Cases handled were youtihs S OFF AT IDEA Army Issues Statement to ! United Press Deny: ing Rumor. AFTER RING LEADER Philippine Constabulary Disclosed That Uprising ! Was Premature. i (By United Prcsa). Manila, May 4. — Colonel W. S. Sturglll, acting chief of staff of the Philippines department of theiU. >S. army today told the United Press .that the army had- absolutely no suspicion of Japanese implication in the, Sakdal- ista uprisings. "The army made no statement nor any intimation, whatever, of any; Japanese -connection with the Sakdalistas and holds no such suspicion," he said. '.'If it has been so represented, the army desires that It be denied." (By United Press). Tokyo, -May 4. — Authorities of the Japanese foreign and war offices tonight termed ."ridiculous" rumors attributed to revolutionist agitators that Japan had a.part in the Sakdalista party uprising yesterday -in the Philippines. AJ war office official, meantime, ridiculed the thought that the "Japanese army would assist radicals! anywhere when it is well known that the army opposes uprisings anywhere." The official said he did not know Benigno Ramos, Sakdalista leadfer, who, according to the Philippine rumors, had .sought to. solicit aid in Japan for the insurrectionist case. It | was learned that Ramos definitely had been in Japan and had i attended social functions where he met some at the foreign office staff. It was said,: however, thatflhere was no hint of politics on such occasions and that he had been accepted as a visiting writer and tourist. . : One army officer said he had never heard of Ramos, but was certain whoever he claims to represent never obtained guns ov other munitions in or from Japan. Anti-Nazi Books Are Placed : on the Blacklist by Germany Berlin, May 4. — The reich chamber of literature!, controlling all publishers, authors and booksellers, has created a list of forbidden books. The decree lists the names of all boks that "endanger Nazi cultural purposes." ( Booksellers who attempt to sell the works in the list will be expelled from the chamber and thus deprived of the right to continue in business. . The decree provides that "purely scientific" books can not be placed on the list except by the minister "of education himself. Government Announces One to Be Held for Position at Windfall. me between the agesiiof 10 and Cases handled included automo- the mental, jpbys cat and chanlcal equipment necessary toj D j, e the ^ ti b^gi,^ holdup, lar- do so. I j Iceny, trujancy, running away from The entry list eatures one of 'hnmo ,,k^ n >. n .Wi<, .,<••* nfrensa. eatures one of j home, u the most formidable semi-stock jjnj ury tc car teams to eV<r seek honors at Indianapolis. I team to ever enter the face. Designed and built Miller, whose special have predominated the; race tar the past seven years, ten "Ford V-8 Specials performance' Jobs. tered by-Mill The if h! ngovernable, Is the largest by Harry A. motors wlM match their against' the special cars iself.! vere .e«r- your capable* alojal, >*ho hat mined ness and offens'es. ated in children offence person, aJota of carelesa- mischiefjillquor or drug NinetesH institutions are Indiana : delinquent they being White's Institute, Lafirange cpjunty orphan's home, Madison cbunty T. B *•• , . . Pital, Pnnkllni iottnty chfldren'o home, cenfa VI Oibault tome, JFK den homi, coloi tention la. FoWy! St. Vln- Wayne schok nee Grille; Orphan's home, Wlia B. Woj* .home. : (By Unlteil Press). Manila. P. I., May 4.—IritelH- gence units of the Philippines constabulary today disclosed that a miscarriage of plans of Sakdal- ista : party leaders set off prematurely yesterday's bloody- uprising in which 61 persons were killed and j ahj undetermined number wounded: '-. Moving swiftly to clean! up ringleaders of the guerilla outbreaks in more! than a dozen scattered towns: afld villages, the constabulary | i discovered that s Benigno Ramos, fugitive Sfakdalls^a chieftain, Ordered postponement of the I Continued on Pace; 2. TO BE HELD IN TIPTON Leroy Plake, secretary of "the local civil service board has received an announcement from the United States civil service commission, regarding an examination for the position of carrier at the Windfall postoiBce. According to the announcement the examination will be held in Tipton and Mr. Plake stated it would be at the high school building, where there will be ample accommodations and quietness. : There arc two carriers at the Windfall'office, Henry Zehner and Noel Schell and according to information from the local office, both are substitute carriers. The two regular carriers William Huffman and James Sholty have not been working for some time. the announcement states that applications will be .received up to ;May 24 and blanks .can be secured from iMr. Plake at the Tipton postofflce or by writing direct to the United States civil service board at Washington, D. C. Applications will be answered by cards of admission to take thy examination and these cards will contain the date for the test tor rural route carrier. The examination can be taken by both men and women one requirement being they, must reside in the' territory served by the.of- fice at Windfall. The salary for rural -carrier on a standard route of 30 miles is $1,800 annually with an additional S2Q per mile forieaeh mile or fraction thereof over 30. The announcement for examination has caused considerable 'speculation as to whether two' appointments or one' are to be made at the office, as both carriers now 'on are said to be substitutes. = | ' '' ***• — \ ','.:. Is Improving. '' I- Mrs. Dorothy' Jaqua of this'city its reported to Ibe ' gaining very jnicely at the Bieechwood hospital •^heire she underwent a major- ojpeifatlon a -fevir days ago. Authorities Investigate Kidnaping of Two in New Mexico. PREPARING DEFENSE Communist Leader and torney for Alleged Murderers Guarded. Fore regn f jfo Quit Mwchukuo ip government HbldsFirin • u i-• .. - iT ~—i •• i •—'— : —n~ Mutdep, May 4. —' A»>are*tly | Wge.j as the. P«jl*fn L refinery ^ and convinced that the Manchnknpan goveinm int does not «• Intend weakening its standjoh the petroleum Monopoly, the British, Amer> lean*! and 'Dutch companies *re~ preparing to close their offices an,d mire from the Moftchurlan flew-H'lh ; probable that as a final gesture their. local soutjces jare capablq of at tbq most 80 per cent Bit i the. .existing Requirements; 1 ! The "Oil Moo >poly Bureau had wigjnaUy anno J ti ade, S OH Mon6 ed the , Inten- ,r»t *of u **"^ •"•"•y ^^pT * H : on! of pnrch'aK ng ithe remainder [•om the" foreisn (companies; aa 7 irtlal compensi ition for their loss i . -i? ri (By United Press}. Gallup, N. M., May 4.—Authorities by intimation today accused Robert Minor, high Communist leader, and David Levinson, labor attorney, of obstructing the investigation into their own kid- naping. Sheriff D. W. Roberts, who thought the kidnaping a hpa.s while Minor and Levinson were returning to civilization after -he? ing abandoned in the desert hy their abductors, said peace .officials had not been permitted to interview either of the men. "We hope to learn enough about the case today so that 3 definite link in the kidnaping might be established," he said. Authorities were turned away from Minor and Levinson on the plea that they were resting, Roberts said. Minor and Levinson returned here surrounded by a'.police guard provided by Gov. Clyde Tingley. Their heads were swathed in bandages and each carried a PlttgV They declared they would not 'b^ intimidated by masked men and were here for "a finish fight." Levinson and Minor today began work on the defense of IP laborers charged with murder la connection with the ; slaying of Sheriff M. R. Carmichael during a riot of the unemployed April •£ They worked with pistols in .their laps, the four state troopers gro- vided by Gov. Tingley at their backs. Although they were kidnaped. Thursday night byi men ajl masked, Minor and Levinson were • sure they could identity three ojp four of the 10 men.: ' were certain they coiild the automobile used ! hy the ductors. They were driven to th> desert 20 miles from here, iy beaten on the way, and out with sacks tied over beads. Gov. Tingley issued no ment, but provided the policy guard when requested. He asked by International labor fense officials to send the n guard here. Local pledged a thorough inyest Minor is ajmember |of tral committee of thejCom: party, ohce Communist ( for the United Stat€s!J8enatj| : 'j for mayor of New Yorjk Ctt mer editor of the Daily Wi Communist organ. H^: story of the abduction; : He and Levinson werei In an automobile! on street Thursday night, talk the wife of one of. the'«,« laborers. A cir ;sl were forced out of chine, into the other, j "I thought they: mi us," he said, "k Lye and one of them ialn the head. I wai a_few seconds. agHn. One^jof' over my month. |l! hi bit him ' J ' L ' away and cur '"ihs •they

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