Ukiah Daily Journal from Ukiah, California on March 8, 2004 · Page 5
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Ukiah Daily Journal from Ukiah, California · Page 5

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Ukiah, California
Issue Date:
Monday, March 8, 2004
Page:
Page 5
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COMMUNITY MONDAY. MARCH 8, 2004 - 5 Look for additional Students of the Month this week Students of the Month for January 2004 Frank Zeek Elementary School Nokomis Elementary School Yokavo Elementary School Frank Zeek Students of the Month for January 2004 are clockwise from the front left: Taryn Mobley, 4th grade; Natasha Haskell, 5th grade; Cody Davis, 4th grade; Joe Neustel, 5th grade; Roberto Fuentes, 6th grade; and middle, Kaysha Isgrigg, 6th grade. Nokomis Students of the Month for January 2004 are clockwise from the front left: Silvia Iniguez, 4th grade; Revecca Malddnado, 6th grade; William Cayler, 5th grade; Ramon Plaza, 6th grade; Ashlyn Fellman, 5th grade; and Salvador Gomez, 4th grade. Yokayo Students of the Month for January 2004 clockwise from the front middle: Brenna Monroe, grade; Brand! Wallis, 5th grade; Zach Covey, grade; Victor Gonzalez, 5th grade; Ben Lampson, grade; and Kassie Smith, 5th grade. are 4th 5tH 4th Oak Manor Elementary School Redwood Valley Elementary School Hopland Elementary School Oak Manor Students of the Month for January 2004 are front row from the left: Alyssa Waddington, 4th grade; Alexis Johnson, 6th grade; and Jazzmin Barnes, 5th grade. Back frow from the left: Elijah Maples, 5th grade; Garrett Taylor, 4th grade; and Tyler Rockel, 6th grade. Redwood Valley Students of the Month for January 2004 are clockwise from the front left: Yhovana Martinez, 4th grade; Savannah Drew, 5th grade; Lucero Galvez, 5th grade; and Marissa Eaquinto, 4th grade. La Vida Continued from Page 3 resisted ... Following the war of 1812, the U.S. adopted a policy of the wholesale removal of Native American peoples to the Indian Territory west of the Mississippi river. Removal was made a basic tenet of most treaties. By 1830, President Jackson got the • Indian Removal Act through Congress; this authorized the president to set up districts within the Western Indian Territory for eastern peoples who agreed to relocate. Entire tribes were forced to resettle, and several wars resulted when Native Americans refused to accept resettlement. Like their counterparts in the northern plains, southern plains Indians fought against being relocated to reserva-. tions. Their resistance was incited by such outrages as the Sand Creek massacre in Colorado. On Nov. 29, 1864 John Chivington commanded his Colorado volunteers in an assault on a clump of dwellings occupied by Black Kettle and his band, who had been assured they would be unmolested on their forsaken reservation. Cheyenne men, women and children, numbering around 200, were annihilated. Indian forays onto frontier settlements in Colorado, Kansas, New Mexico and Texas came to a head in the Red River War of 1874-75. The results of this conflict were several: • The Indians were deprived of their homelands and forced to relocate to reservations in Oklahoma. • The near-extinction of the buffalo continued unabated. • The region was thrown open to white settlement, including ranching and farming. The Ute nation also rose episodically against the whites. Mormon settlers were relentlessly overtaking Ute lands and exhausting their resources and wildlife. Seeing that the Mormon intrusion was getting worse, some of the Ute precipitated a series of forays into Mormon settlements. This was called the Walker War, which resulted in orders from President Abraham Lincoln to force them onto Uintah Valley Reservation... The whole concept of this essay for me is to tell you that white people didn't even try to rebuild our society; they stuck us on reservations and told us to deal with it. Native American Indians are a people in transition between history and contemporary America. The challenge for Native Americans is to maintain their heritage, erase a stereotype and adjust their recognition in society. Native Americans are too often stereotyped by antiquated and discriminatory attitudes which misrepresent valued contributions to America's development and growth. I mean, sure the government gives us money, but we still don't have our freedom, we don't have the way of life that used to be ours that no one else could take from us. We live by their rules now. Hopland Students of the Month for January 2004 are clockwise from the front left: Juanita Castro, 5th grade; Juliana Castro, 6th grade; and Gurdeep Walia, 4th grade. WYMT IRRIGATION • AG • PLUMBING • FIRE PROTECTION AGRICULTURAL IRRIGATION • DRIP & FROST 462-7473 2200 N. State Street • Ukiah Mesothelioma or Lung Cancer If you have been diagnosed with MESOTHELIOMA the likely cause is exposure to ASBESTOS. Medical science has proven that even slight exposures to asbestos can cause mesothelioma. One eyenin cd n chdiii ^^M^^^^^mWf -4^^^^P W'^MI^^P-jpP urdirecti You and your family may be entitled to compensation. Call for information about your legal rights. 1-800-440-4262 * Free Consultation * 25 Years Experience Ukiah Campus Teaching Credential Programs • Info Session in Lakeport • Thursday, March 11*6 p.m. • Earn your credential on the weekends, close to home. • • Multiple Subject, Single Subject, and Special Education Teaching Credentials available • Finish in two semesters • Earn your credential at the university that leads the way in teacher education • Lake County Office of Education • 1152 South Main Street • Lakeport • For information Call 707-463-4800 or toll free 1>800*541>4884. www.dominican.edu This place changes people. DOMINICAN UNIVERSITY »/CALIFORNIA IB JO '..I

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