Ukiah Daily Journal from Ukiah, California on March 8, 2004 · Page 2
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Ukiah Daily Journal from Ukiah, California · Page 2

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Monday, March 8, 2004
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2 - MONDAY, MARCH 8, 2004 DAILY DIGEST Stewart jurors swayed by assistant, perplexed by limited defense Group believed key "We tried five ways Friday to take it from different angles. To work it through. And — that prosecution witnesses "We tried five ways Friday to take it from different angles. To work it through. And was it. We were ... we just could not have done anything else." •MEG CRANE, juror in Martha Stewart case NEW YORK (AP) — Jurors who convicted Martha Stewart of lying about a stock sale said they believed the key prosecution witnesses against the homemaking guru and were surprised that her team didn't ;rnount a more aggressive defense. •\- They also said Stewart's reputation as a stickler for detail belied her Iclaim that she did not remember ; receiving a message from her broker warning her the price of a stock she held was about to fall. , "That wasn't really believable. 'Cause this is a woman who pays attention to details," juror Rosemary McMahon told Dateline NBC in an interview with six jurors scheduled to air Sunday. A jury of eight women and four men deliberated 12 hours over three days before returning guilty verdicts Friday on all four counts against Stewart — conspiracy, obstruction and two counts of making false statements. Stewart was expected to meet with her probation officer as soon as Monday. All the charges relate to an accusation that Stewart lied to cover up the reason she sold 3,928 shares of ImClone Systems stock on Dec. 27, 2001 — avoiding a hefty loss when the company announced bad news the next day. Prosecutors had offered Stewart a chance last April to plead guilty to just one of the four charges against her — making a false statement — in exchange for a probation sentence, Newsweek reported Sunday, quoting several unidentified sources close to the case. But a defense source told the magazine that prosecutors could not guarantee that Stewart would avoid jail time completely and Stewart refused the offer, Newsweek reported. Jurors said while they spent days exhaustively going over the evidence, they always came to the same conclusion. "We tried five ways Friday to take it from different angles," juror Meg Crane said. "To work it through. And — and that was it. We were ... we just could not have done anything else." Jurors said they were surprised the defense spent less than an hour presenting its side, after the prosecution took four weeks to make its case. "We thought there was going to be more from the defense," said juror Jonathan Laskin, 48, a paralegal and translator. "We ... were hoping they would put up more of a fight or something. Or give us more to chew on. But it wasn't there." Jurors said the most compelling testimony came from Stewart's assistant Ann Armstrong, who testified that Stewart sat down at Armstrong's desk to change a message from her broker, Peter Bacanovic, that informed her that he thought the ImClone stock price would start falling. "She ultimately gave the testimony that was going to bring Martha down. That was a very important piece," said juror Chappell Hartridge. Despite efforts by the defense to discredit the prosecution's star witness, Douglas Faneuil, jurors said they believed the testimony of the former Merrill Lynch assistant. "We all agreed that he was very rehearsed, and we did take a long look at that," juror Laskin said. But, he added, "we ultimately felt that it (his testimony) was essentially credible." Many jurors said they were stunned by longtime Stewart friend Mariana Pasternak's testimony that Stewart had told her she knew ImClone CEO Sam Waksal was selling his stock. Pasternak testified she remembered Stewart saying, "Isn't it nice to have brokers who tell you those things?" although she backed off that claim on cross- examination. "We were like, 'Wow,'" juror Dana D'Allessandro said. "That blew me away." Hartridge said, "It took down two people with one shot." Bacanovic was convicted of obstruction, making false statements, conspiracy and perjury. Jurors also said they weren't impressed by the courtroom visits of some of Stewart's celebrity friends, including Rosie O'Donnell and Bill Cosby. "I felt, 'Are we being manipulated here in some way?'" Laskin said. Both Stewart and Bacanovic have vowed to appeal. Maryland ag officials order slaughter after bird flu found Avian influenza prompts killing of more than 300,000 birds By GRETCHEN PARKER The Associated Press POCOMOKE CITY, Md. — The discovery of avian influenza in Maryland compelled agriculture officials to order the slaughter of 328,000 birds on two huge commercial chicken farms, nearly four times the number killed when two Delaware farms were infected last month. The cases in Delaware and on Maryland's Eastern Shore 'are from the same H7 strain, which is not harmful to humans, authorities said Sunday. Maryland agriculture officials confirmed Saturday that a farm with about 118,000 chickens was infected. They ordered the slaughter of those birds, as well as 210,000 oth- eVs at another farm about a mile away under the same' ownership. The slaughter began Sunday and was expected to take until Tuesday. Agriculture officials also ordered a quarantine that cover^ eight farms within a two- mile radius of the infected farm, which grows chickens oh a contract basis for Mountaire Farms of Selbyville, Del. The department also began testing 79 poultry farms within a six- rhile radius. ' The infected farm in Worcester County is about 45 miles from the nearest infected farm in Delaware. Authorities said they had not discovered a connection between the cases, but could not rule out any relation. Officials emphasized the strain of the virus is not a threat to humans, but it can wipe out poultry farms, especially if it turns up in a highly pathogenic form. "It is discouraging, and it's surprising to us," Maryland Agriculture Secretary Lewis Riley, said Sunday at a news conference near the infected farm in Pocomoke City. "We're ready, and we're prepared to address it and to handle it." The flu case dimmed hopes that international markets banning U.S. poultry would drop their embargoes. Those with a block on imports include the 15-nation European Union, China, Japan, Mexico, Russia and South Korea. A different, more dangerous avian influenza strain has killed some 100 million birds in Asia and has been blamed for the deaths of more than 20 people in Vietnam and Thailand. "It's got everyone's palms sweating right now. It's a very serious situation," said Jeff Green, who works for a fertilizer distributor and owns a chicken farm in nearby Marion. "We hope the quarantine will get it under control." Also on Sunday^ Riley tightened a statewide ban on moving, gathering or selling live birds. Industry leaders and state officials declined to identify the infected farm to keep away visitors who might spread the disease. But it is visible from a nearby state road, and workers in white plastic bio-security suits were seen Sunday cleaning out the chicken houses as state troopers blocked off the area. Mountaire Farms officials did not immediately return a call Sunday. Officials said they discovered the flu after a grower reported many of his chickens were dying. The state ordered the slaughter of birds on that farm as well as in houses about a mile away that are under the same ownership. A third farm owned by the grower is two miles away and will be observed this week, officials said. s A more dangerous strain of avian influenza was found in Texas last month FIRES RESCUE LOTTERY NUMBERS CAR IN LAKE — At 11:39 a.m., a car with a passenger was reported to have become submerged into Lake Mendocino from the south boat ramp. The passenger was taken to a local hospital. No other information was available at press time. DAILY 3: Afternoon—5, 7, 6; Evening—9, 6, 9. FANTASY 5: 13, 18, 19, 21,34. DAILY DERBY: 1st Place: 05, California Classic; 2nd Place: 08, Gorgeous George; 3rd Place: 07, Eureka. Race time: 1:43.23. Insurgents fire rockets at U.S. coalition headquarters area BAGHDAD, Iraq (AP) — Insurgents fired at least seven rockets on the U.S. coalition headquarters in Baghdad Sunday night, hitting a hotel used by U.S. occupation officials and wounding one American, the military said. It was the biggest attack on the Green Zone in weeks. A series of explosions echoed across central Baghdad from the strike, sirens blared, and smoke and flames' were briefly visible in the Green Zone, the heavily guarded area where the U.S.-led coalition is based. Five rockets hit the Al- Rasheed hotel, where some civilian contractors are living and a coalition dining hall is located. A U.S. civilian contractor was wounded, the military said. Shots fired at demonstration to demand trial for ousted Haitian leader, at least five killed PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti (AP) — Gunshots erupted Sunday at a protest to demand that ousted Haitian President Jean-Bertrand Aristide be tried for corruption and fomenting violence. At least four demon- strators and a foreign journalist were killed. Witnesses blamed Aristide militants, but that could not immediately be confirmed. The shooting occurred as crowds gathered in front of the presidential National Palace. Witnesses said they saw Aristide supporters shooting at the crowd in front of the National Palace, and they complained that peacekeepers did nothing to prevent the violence. After the shooting, a truck with speakers bolted to its frame paraded around the palace, blasting music. One man speaking over a truck loudspeaker shouted at the U.S. Marines: "People are dying every day in this country. You have to do something about it." Haitian police and U.S. and French troops who had been guarding the march route began patrolling the area of the shooting to bring it back under control. Gay bishop takes over as head of diocese CONCORD, N.H. (AP) — With three mighty thumps on the church door Sunday, V. Gene Robinson knocked and was welcomed into St. Paul's sanctuary, where he officially became the Episcopal Church's first openly gay bishop. Sunday's investiture ceremony does not carry the same weight as Robinson's conse- HAIRCUTS $700 7 Ukiah Beauty College Supervised student work only. 1040 V. State St., Ikluh • 46244131 STEAK HOUSE _ ^85-7301 BROILED IN OUR OAKWOOD PIT 8400 Uva Drive Redwood Valley DINNER FOR 2 Rib Steak or Deep Fried Prawns INCLUDES Baked Potato, Green Salad and Roll* Good Monday thru Thursday Evening} OPEN MON.-THURS. 4-10 P.M.' FRIDAY-SATURDAY 4-11 P.M. SUNDAY 3-10P.M. Coupon good through April 1, 2004 PRKENT COUPOH AS YOU ORDER Switchboard, 468-3500,4684123 Jeff H. Ca§penen, Jr. • SporU Editor 468-3518 Yvonne Bell-Office Manager 468-3506 Ctoutalton ««•»» l"*» l"»bert • F«»u«S Mltor 468-3520 Circulation Manager 468-3532 OMWW 468-3535,468-3536 Chief Photographer 468-3538 Newspaper In Education Service* 468-3534 UgalrtlaMlfled Adverting 468-3529 Ann Cooper-Advertising 468-3511 UDJ Web site uld9hdalMoumal,coin Koto NcCoaaell - Publisher 468-3500 Joe Chavei-Advertlsing 468-3513 E-mail udj@paclflc.net K.C. Neadowt-EdHor 468-3526 Victoria HamUet-AdvertlsIng 468-3514 Cindy Delk -Advertising Director 468-3510 'Emily Fragoso-AdvertlslngAsst ..468-3528 LOCALLY OPERATED MEMBER Sue HfhlUi«n - Oroup Syrtew Orator ....468-3548 cration, which rocked the Episcopal Church in November. But it gave a capacity crowd of more than 600 the chance to welcome the new leader of the Diocese of New Hampshire with whistles, shouts and a standing ovation. Bishop Douglas Theuner, who officially retired Sunday, handed Robinson the ceremonial staff that transferred the diocese into his hands. They had shared power since Robinson was made a bishop. Weather was 'hateful' as Baltimore harbor ferry capsized; three still missing BALTIMORE (AP) — The Navy reservists whose quick work saved 21 people aboard a water taxi that capsized described the horrific scene in which they made their rescue: survivors clinging to the overturned vessel in frigid, choppy' water pounded by rain, telling them more were trapped below. One woman was killed in Saturday's accident in Baltimore Harbor and three people, including a child, were missing, but the reservists said Sunday they were relieved the loss of life wasn't even greater. The sailors rushed to the scene after seeing the boat in trouble. After passengers clinging to the water taxi told them others were trapped underneath, the rescuers used a ramp on their troop landing ship to lift the water taxi partly out of the water, Petty Officer Jeffrey King said. Water temperatures were in the low 40s, and heavy rain was pouring from black clouds as survivors were pulled out of the water. "It was pretty hateful," Petty Officer Henry Zecher said. "I'm relieved that we were able to save as many lives as we were." Militants pledge revenge after 14 Palestinians killed in Israeli raid in Gaza refugee camp BUREIJ REFUGEE CAMP, Gaza Strip (AP) — Israeli troops carried out their deadliest raid in Gaza in 17 months on Sunday, part of a surge of bloodshed ahead of a possible Israeli withdrawal from the coastal strip. Fourteen Palestinians were killed and 81 wounded in more than six hours of fighting on the edge of the Bureij refugee camp. The battle pitted Palestinians armed with assault rifles, anti-tank missiles and grenade launchers against Israeli troops firing from helicopters, tanks and rooftop sniper positions. Children chased tanks, throwing stones. Among the dead were three boys, ages $, 12 and 15. tiSHm*****,*^ FD-24 Find something Interesting to do in 'URNAL The Ukiah DAI The Ukiah ©2003, MedlaNews Group. Published Dally by The Ukiah Dally Journal at 590 S. School St., Ukiah, Mendocino County, CA. Phone: (707) 468-3500. Court Decree No. 9267 Periodicals Postage Paid at Ukiah, CA. To report a missed newspaper, call the Circulation Department between 5 and 6:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, or between 7 and 9 a.m. weekends. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Ukiah Dally Journal, Post Office Box 749, Ukiah, CA. 95462. Subscriptions rates for home delivery as of May 1,2001 are 3 months for $28,04; and 1 year for $112.15. All prices do not include sales tax. Publication f (USPS-646-920). '

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