Alton Evening Telegraph from Alton, Illinois on October 19, 1956 · Page 18
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Alton Evening Telegraph from Alton, Illinois · Page 18

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Alton, Illinois
Issue Date:
Friday, October 19, 1956
Page:
Page 18
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PAGE ALTON EVENING TELEGRAPH FRIDAY, OCTOBER 19,1956 , fill* BfeN BOL1 John Cullen Mttrphf PIOM'Tl/6< YOU VERY ' THS IS MY Wi6MO, PEN PCXt. Ml** PAXTDtt HOW DO YOU > DO, MR. BOLT. I've StENYOU* PICTUK6 M4NY tlMES! fcEN, MOW'S 4BOUT YOU INT8O KESP6CTPUU? SOYOUCJOT PUCIWS ME ANP THE USPV, BE ON THE UPAHP UP ? t»VeutVAiftTO«WCW TO MISS.' LUCKY — TVMT'S VW4T 'THE/ OUSMT TO C/1LL ME- THE STORY OF MARTHA WAVNE By Wilson Scruggs TMCWSHTyOD SAID HE M5 HflS. FITOUS WTH SCW BFCAfSr DOVfLET VCWAlWf MADF HIM PAY BACKTHr MONEY HE 1 FOOL YOU/ r\ NEED SOME naR BOOTS AND HER BUDDIES By Edgar Martin \\\ v I OPEKJH3 lOlMtfT ' THE BWOK, THE SMITH FAMILY By Mr. and Mrs. George Smith .AHP IT LOOK& UKE. IM \T QETTlNQ FOR rtY LAST ALLEY OOP By V. T. Hamlin GQ5H,DOC,I WOULqi I [ WELL, AU. I KNOW ONLY I COWT > J - L -s,lS HE'LL CO ANVl KNOW HOW /WHATS A \THING COP, \OU'VE \ TO HANDLE I FISH GOT ) HIM TPO IF JUST GOT TO I 'IM WITHOUT} TO DO GET THKT \ A FISH.' J WITH IT?^ T'GIVE 1M,' THIMS OUTA BUTOOP.WEVE GOT NO FISH ABOUND HB?E TO GIVE 1M! ...HOW ABCLTTA CAM OF SARDINES? OUIi BOARDING HOUSE ESAD.MAKTHAfl'N eO ATTACHED TO I SHUDDER AT THE fHOOSHTOF TWe Lrrue FELLOW A6 A P PQAST/-^- HOVJEVeR, HE 15 OUT- i—I ALMOST, <.YllSH, 'AWAV/J With MAJOR HOOPLE ' THAT STATEMENT PROVES ] OtiB THIMS TO ME — YOUR k TRUMPETING ABODT WHAT h A 816, TOUGH TI6ER YoJ ARE 16 ALL 5U6HTLVOPF K'eV/—AT HEAET YOU'RE I 3UST A PIG'S BEST FRIEMD! -DM/(3UTE A PROBLEM, 80T EINlSTB^ <* $OLvieD50Me .) ALMOST AS HART)// ' ~ —\ESi- >. "'^r TJHIS (B 10 TAKB AL6EBKA' MAYBE = OUT OUR WAY By J. R. Williams I JUST REMEMBERED I \ HAVE AMOTHER APPOlMT- ) IT'LL OMLV TAICE A HALF HOUR-I'LL BE FREE BEFORE YOU GET UP THESE STAIES- THEW WE CAN GO OVEK.THAT MEW PEAWIM6 IDGETHER./ TH' PRAFTIM 1 X HE IS/ BOSS IS 61 VIM' IKWOWS ALL TH' BULLA 6OO& PIG IM THEIR LITTLE FEUP OF TRICKS.' 1 THATS A BUT HE LIKES JPltbXruS, TO PUT ONE /TOO/ HE OVER ONJ HIM 1 KNOWS IN FRONT OF / IT'LL SOON) A BIG rV BE ALL AUDIENCE OF TH' WINP- BAGSIW TK SHOP, AM' THE COURIERS FRECKLES AND HIS FRUBNDS By Merrill Blosser I WAS FIRM wrrw JILL JONES/i TOLD wee iwiRpiNG WENT" AS »R AS SUPPLYING THE TRAMSPORTATiOM ^ >T °°- / THAT MUST Be DOLLS Now/ PAP NEEPEP THE FAMILY CAR. TONIGHT, BUT WHEN I EXPLAINED ABOLTT TWIRP SEASOfJ I COOPERATEP / BRAVO FOR MR. JONES / ^ CAPTAIN EASY By Leslie Turner f ..A SfSTTEKy OF ^W *>KE . - «. , ^ VVORKIN6 TO KEWkOVE THE , W REPLV TO PR. ^> PWNT ?KON\ PR.IAtMllOW/ A McMINH'5 F|.ftTTeKlN<3^ FEW CO-EPS FA1NTEP AT 1 J 5H&LL£V/ THE BELOVEP PREXy'6 ir^r<f REMARKS ABOUT THE 5HHHJ V RUFFIANS WHO T|EP HIM UPI PLEASE, j^ .-...,.-;--. - < .AK.M<:KEE/..PART OP A REIflN OF &(? H& WA&J,..YOU'R& < TERROR THAT6WBPf PK.WcMI-i/MOMgUN 1 ^ THE USUALLY PEACEFUl -^^O LOUP I S .CAWPU5 TONI6HTI TWO CAN'T HEARywi6$IW6 FRE&HMENi FOUNP UKJPBR THE- CHI RH0 HOD60,WfRE r^—/ ) rwrnifflTinrar ™ FRISHTEN&D K ^-UaMfflKWBr^. TO TALK I PR. (AeMNN ORSEP ^h7l WOULPNT HELP IN TRACKING POWN J U$TEN TO 5UCH THE ELPERLV HOOPLUMS, t OOS5IP, WASH! WHOW HE PESCRIBEPAS 4 N °W * T ART FOLLOWS" ^^(iA. PACKIW61 # # * itl/. / x RIVETS George Sixta TUB BERRYS By Carl Grubert " BUt WHY CANT I USE OUR CHARGE ACCOUNT AT SPIEGLERS ? BECAUSE ITS JUST FOR MOTHERS CONVENIENCE JACKIE/ GEE, MXfeE UUCKV, MOM., SOU DONT NEED MONEY TO BUY THINGS.'. (T GOES MUCH PARTNER THAN YOUR FATHERS MONEY.' DONALD DUCK By Walt Disney HENRY By Carl t Anderson PLEASE CO MOT WASTE WATER TODAY'S JUNIOR EDITORS THE STORY OE GLASS - S A Mosaic Long before glass came into general use'It was used in the palaces ol kings and princes and in churches and cathedrals thoughout Europe. Hundreds of pieces o( colored glass, held together by narrow strips of lead, were used to make Windows of great beauty, many of which are still preserved. Another way glass was used was for mosaics, or pictures made by pressing tiny pieces of colored glass Into a plaster base. The early Assyrians, Egyptians and Romans covered walls and floors with mosaics. Here is a paltern you can use for a paper mosaic. You may color It with your crayons if you wish, before pasting it down on cardboard. Be sure you paste it smoothly so you can trace over it. Take a piece ol gray or tan cardboard as a foundation and trace the pattern on to it. Trace each small piece of mosaic on to colored crepe paper-the glazed sort used to line envelopes looks particularly like glass. Thenpastethemontothe base, so you have a brightly colored mosaic ot a flower. ' (The Junior Editors $10 award goes to Alan Henricks, Oklahoma City, Okla,,-,for contributing this idea first. Perhaps you have an idea for Junior Editors. U so, send it in care of this newspaper. Violet Moore Higgins; AP Newsfeatures). 10-19 L Tomorrow: Class In our Dally Lives FUNNY BUSINESS By Hershberger "Thoughtful of the bus company, isn't it?" CARNIVAL By Dick Turner "Space travel will be no novelty to me! My wife's driving has been out of this world for years!" s True Life Adventures ARE A POOR IN TH>6 <JASE. TMB PCTOPUS KNOWS VT CANNOT owe THAT MAY rr$ INK PISCHARSE A BUT AFFE^TfS THB MORAY'S OP eMlsU. 6O THAT HB <2ANY PINP HIS VICTIM >K) THE MURKV Authority Describes SniokingAsCancerCause PROVIDENCE, R. I. w-More than 100 Rhode Island physicians and surgeons watched a closed circuit television program Wednesday night in which a medical authority described long-term smoking as a major cause of lung cancer. A reporter with them said the doctors sat in a smoke-filled hotel room with, most ol the doctors puffing on cigarettes while watching the program. In the program originating from Boston, Dr. Henry L. Bockus. ot the University of Pennsylvania said the reason for more lung cancer among males Is that men have been smoking longer than women. GtfbPerfeetl A 15-inch dolly and clothes! Perfect gift for a little girl; she'll love dressing her each day —braiding, curling dolly's hair. Pattern 576: Transfer, directions for 15-inch doll; pattern for dress, skirt, petticoat and shoes. Very easy to sew, mother! Send 215 cents In coins for tills pattern—add five cents Tor each pattern for first-class mailing. Send to Alton Telegraph, 68, Needlecraft Dopt., P.O. Box 161, Old Chelsea Station, New York 11, N. Y. Print plainly Pattern Number, your Name, and Address. Our Rift to you—two wonderful patterns for yourself, your home printed in our Laura Wheeler Needlecraft Book . . . Plus dozens of other new designs to order —crochet, knitting, embroidery, iron-ons, noveMies. Send 25 cents for your copy of this book now— with gift patterns printed in it! Waist-Sizes to 38 PATTERN 4681 WAIST Printed Pattern for the larger woman! This new skirt is designed especially for waist sizes from 28 through 38! The accent is on slenderness — with long gores, center front pleat, button- trim pockets— all to flatter your figure ! Printed Pattern 4681: Women's Waists 28, 30, 3L', 34, 36, 38 inches. Size 30 takes 2& yards 39-inch. Directions printed on each tissue pattern part. Easy-to-use, accurate, aassures perfect fit. Send 35 cents In coins for this pattern — add five cents for each pattern for firsi-cluss mailing. Send to ANNE ADAMS, care of Alton Telegraph, 177, Pattern Oept., 243 W. 17th St., New York 11, N. Y. Print plainly Name, Add r oss, Size, and Style Number, The hardest people to convince they are of retirement' age are the kids at bedtime. ©NEA® Women No Longer . Brave Crocodiles Postwomen no longer carry the mail In Nyusaland, They are no longer needed, as u plane will carry mail between Nkata Bay and Chinieche on Lake Nyasa, Women used to make the 26-mile arduous journey with mailbags on their heads, canoeing across thb cracodile-and, hippo-infested Luweya River and walking through leopard country. They were employed because men of the area would not work when women were around to do it. », <

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