The Ohio County News from Hartford, Kentucky on March 3, 1875 · Page 3
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The Ohio County News from Hartford, Kentucky · Page 3

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Wednesday, March 3, 1875
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3 General Williams told Holland, of the Eminence Constitutionalist, the other day, that he was approached by one of 3rakt's emissaries last winter, Who said to him: "In the new order of things you, General Williams, will be a Royal Duke." "An honor," quotha modest Old Borghdm to the astounded editor, "I respectfully declined." This little story, like nearly everything else that falls from Williams' lips, is exceed ingly apocryphal. Had any such prop osition been made him by a genuine emissary of Grant," Sorghum would have swallowed it as eagerly as a hungry trout-gulps down a fly, and instead of running over the State yelling, "Look at me! I am the he-ro of Salt-villel" we would hear him shouting at the top of his voice; " 'Rah for GrantI" The Know-Nothings of Illinois caught him with a less glittering bait than "His Royal Highness, the Grand Duke of Sorgo." The "Managers" of the Public Library Lottery announced, the evening before the drawing, that only thirty-eight per cent, of the tickets were sold, and they were compelled to razee the prizes accordingly. The Courier-Journal, a day or two prior to this, announced that Scorr Glore had purchased all the nnsold tickets, and would "sell .until the turn of the wheel." A friend at Louisville writes us that Glore's purchase amounted to $18,000. If this be true, how did the "Managers" figure out that thirty-eight per cent? We are1 not interested in the matter to the amount of a cent, pecuniarily. It is sim ply a question of arithmetic with us. The Courier-Journal is worrying it self needlessly over Grant's future designs. If it will exercise n little patience, delirium tremens will win its bugaboo for its Own before the next Presidential election. We keep a trained terrapin on our table ibr the benefit of exchange grabbers. And he hangs on to a finger real lovely. THE HERALD. IS PUBLISHED EVERY WEDNESDAY MORNING, 1JT TBI TOWS t?f IAETMED, OHIO C0DS1T, KENTUCKY, JOHN P. BARRETT.& CO., XT TEC FBICK Of sZSTTido Dollars a Year in Advance ""8 Job work of erery description done with ceatneu ui dispatch, at city price. We hire falHIne of job types, end solicit the patronage of the business community. WEDNESDAY. MARCH 3, 1875. J NO. P. BARRETT, Local Editor. A beautiful rainbow, jnet before eun- down, Monday afternoons, panned the eky. Mies J alia Town Bend, who has been ' absent for several montlip, teaching pchool in Gravson county, returned borne last week. March made its entree Sunday night rearing, plunging, pawing, roaring, bel lowing, shaking its mane, and lashing its tail, like a lion that has just stirred up a yellow-jacket a nest. "The Guiding Star," edited by that wit ty and humorous writer, Mrs. M. Mcln- tyre, will be read at the Good Templar's lodge meeting to-morrow night. A rare intellectual treat is in store (or the mem bers who attend. LeetHre by Dr. Henderson. Oar distingniehed and eloquent Super intendent of Public Instruction, Dr. II. A.M. Henderson, will deliver a lecture on popular education and kindred topics, at the courthouse to-morrow night. As the Dr. is no stranger, to our people, it will require no exhortation to induce our citi zens to turn out en masse to hear him on that occasion. Stockholders' Meeting. The annual meeting of the Stockholders of the Ohio County Agricultural and Me chanical Society, will Jbe held at the Court House in Hartford, Ky,, on March 13th 1875, for the purpose of electing a Presf dent and Board of Directors for the ensu ing year. JAS. A. THOMAS,.Tr. Feb. 18, 1675. On last Saturday, one week ago, Virgil Morris, living near Centertown precinct, was arrested, for carrying concealed a deadly weapon, and also for pejury. He was takon before W. L Bowe, J. P. O, C, and on last Thursday he was tried un der the charge of carrying concealed deadly weapons, and acquitted. Th county attorney saw proper to dismiss th other suit, and the prisoner was set at liberty. He was arrested upon the com plaint and information of R. C A eh by. We have.. received the February and " March numbers of the Uluttraltd House hold Magazine, published at 41 Park Row, New York. C D. Findley. editor. It is a marvel of typographical neatness, literary excellence, and cheapness, being mailed to subscribers for only 1 a year. Each number contains forty pages ol reading matter that will compare favorably with the contents of any magazine in the coup try. The'pumber for the current month is the! third ''of tne sixteenth .volume, Wood'slHouscbold.Magaane ha"bn in corporatcd with this publication. The TroHble Between Mr. and Mrs. Martin Scnulan. Martin Scanlan is a small farmer, who lives in McLean county, near the Ohio county line, whence he recently removed from Muhlenburg county. Martin is also well advanced in yar, is married, and loves his "bitters." Besides, he is a genuine Frenchman from Ireland. Mrs. Scanlan is not half .the age of Mar tin, and is represented to us as being a buxom, fine-looking, frisky young native woman, who is as fond of company as Martin is of his bottle. "She can talk to and entertain a feller," asseverated our in formant, "as nice as any gal." It appears that there is ayoungVfeller" in the neighborhood who is particularly fond of .being entertained by her indeed, enjoyed her society so thoroughly, that he spent the larger half of his time at Martin's house. As he paid no board, and his horse was eating up the old. man's corn, Martin at laet grew tired of feeding him and his an imal, and invited him to make his visits shorter and come less frequently. At least he said he was tired of supporting t'other fellow. But his wife accused him of being jealous. Martin denied. Mrs. Martin repeated the accusation, and declared her intention to have the young man come whenever she wanted to se him, and that would be" every day, if she felt like it. Martin swore he shouldn't come, and went out to the crib and took counsel of his bottle. She declared he should, and snatched Martin's dudhcen from the mantel and smashed it on the hearth. He guzzled and she stormed until bedtime, when they retired, both mad and one drunk. Now, we have no idea that Martin ever beard of Othello, and how that dusky worthy put a quietus on Desdemo-na, but Mrs. Martin is very certain that when she woke up about the noon of last Friday night, Martin had the pillow on her face and was enacting the smothering scene to perfection. Mrs. Martin, being woman who won't put up with nonsenee, and also stouter than her husband, and duly sober, soon reversed the situation, and the first thing our Milesian Othello knew, he wab flat of his back, the deadly pillow across his face, and Mrs. Martin calmly sitting atop of it. And she didn't leave her perch until the old man was al-most in eight of "kingdom come." Next morning she bundled up all of her clothing she could conveniently carry, and started off afoot for ber former home and people in Muhlenburg, while Martin betook himself to the woods to hunt squirrels. These things quickly reached the ears of the young feilow who had caused all the trouble, who, imagining that he was the particular squirrel Martin was after, "swore his life agin him," and it was at the examination of the old man laet Monday before a magistrate that the above facts transpired. f Ku-KIni. " - Last Thursday night a number of masked men went to the house of Mrs. Casinger, about eight miles north of Hart ford, in this county, and railed out a young man by the name of Cain, who was living with Mrs. C, and ordered him to leave the county in ten days, and, if he failed to do so, they would come back at the expiration of the time, treat him to a dose of hickory sprouts, and give him an other tea days in which to leave. If he still refused to depart, tbey would come back and kill him. Mrs. Casinger is grass-widow with several children, living alone, having been deserted by her bus-. band, L. N. Casinger, abuut a year ago. Young Cain was hired by her to work her farm, and was the only man about the place. We can learn of no reason why Mr. Cain should be requested to leave the county. Obstreperous Darkies. Thornton Carter and James Oliver Ruck er, two of the government's special wards, had an altercation on Tuesday of last week, in which Carter got his head badly mashed up with the soft side of a brickbat He forthwith went to the police judge and got a writ against Rucker, charging him with intent ro kill. After hearing the case on Wednesday last, the court discharged Rucker on the felony warrant, but held him and Carter both over under a. charge of a breach of the peace, and set their trialjor Friday last, at which time they were tried and fined four dollars each. X Call. It appearing that differences of opinion have arisen in this community, in regard to the meaning of the "Articles of Faith," of the Methodist Church South, as laid down in their "Book of Discipline."' Will Rev. B. A. Cundiff, in a course of lectures, be pleased to give the meaning of the ''Twenty-five Articles of Faith," embraced in the "Book of Discipline,' of the 1 E. Church South. B. P. Bekbtman, and others. Marriage Licences. The following is a list of the marriage li censes issued for the week ending Fcbru ary 27, 1875. Theodore N. Truman and Miss Polly A Crow. John C. Turns and Alivilda L. Daven port William H. Williams and Mrs. Mary E Tichenor. Transfers of Real Estate. The following is a list of the real estate transfers, lodged for record for the week ending February 27, 1875: John A. McCord to John W. Cannon 80 acres of land on Caney Creek. Con siderauon, $45b UU. A Successful Revival. A very interesting, protracted ,meerjng has been held at Walton s Crcejc Baptist church,- recently, by Dr; Bennett. He baptized the converts to the number of twenty five, last Sunday. Jealousy and Pistols. Crit. Park is one of our citizens, as well as one of the "superior race that was boosted something higher by the United States Senate last Saturday. Crit was Once a married man and is yet, though e don't know it but for reasons best nown to himself, divorced himself from his better it' may be his worser half, and has been' hoeing a row by himself for some time,- if not longer. Louis Griffin is a gentleman of the same persuasion, only more so, as charcoal will make a white mark" on his face. Besides, Louis is an appreciater of the gentler sex, and, possibly, can discover charms invisi ble to Crit.Vduller optics. At any rate, that which Crit. discarded as base paste Louies picked up and has been wearing in his bosom as a diamond of the first water. In other words, be has been appropriating the "bed and board'1 deserted by Crit. And right here steps in the human na ture part of the business. Crit wouldn't chaw terbaccer hisself," and he don't wan't any other nigger to "chaw" it He found no comfort in the hoe-cakes, hugging, snoring, and scolding of Mrs. Crit, and it made him mad to think that any other fellow should find comfort therein. So his eyes turned green, and his tongue grew familiar with profanity, and the honey of his heart was turned to the gall of bitterness. He saw blood on the moon, and his dreams were haunted by coffins and dead niggers, and all the "corpuses" wore the features of Louis Griffin. This sort of thing became at last unbearable. Procuring a pistol, he loaded .himself with "benzine whisky," and sallied out Monday to punctuate Louis' line of life with a leaden period. Louis beard of the howling death that was on his trail, and prepared himself to meet and repel the 'shock of war." Rumors of the pending and seemingly irrepressible conflict reached the ever open ears of our worthy town marshal, who came down upon the thirstcrs for each other's blood, "like a wolf on the fold' and yanked them both off to durance vile. Judge Luce, in consequence of pressure of business that could not well be post poned, set their trial foryesterday, when-important witnesses failing to appear the case was continued 'until to-day at one o'clock. Both the belligerents were equired to give bond for their prompt appearance. Louis "ponied np" but Crit failed to find a friend who had sufficient confidence in him to stand his sponsor on a bail-bond, and consequently bad to wag himself, together with his grief and wrongs, to the ever-hospitable caravansary of Lara Wise. This case is creating quite a sensation in upper-crust colored society, of which all' the parties are conspicuous members. Parson nnmphrejs. A petition was circulated among and universally signed by the citizens of Hartford, last Mqnday, praying the conference of the M. E. Church, which meets at Louisville on the 17th inst, to return Parson Humphreys to this charge. Mr. Humphreys is a man we can illy spare. He is a man of piety. He is a man of brains. He is not bigoted or narrow- contracted. He believes that Christ died for all men, and not for those of his par ticular faith. And he preaches a whole some and liberal doctrine, the sequence of such belief. We should be sorry to lose him, and hope the prayer of the. petition will be granted by the conference. New Millinery Establishment. We learn that as soon as the spring opens Sirs. Laura naynes, Misa ,mma Houston, and Miss Belle Sullenger, pro pose to open a millinery store in our town. As these ladies are "home folks," and propose to furnish just as good work as can be obtained in the city, and at as low prices as anybody, we bespeak for them a liberal patronage. They also propose to conduct the dress making and hair-braid- inz business along with the other. Full particulars will be announced in due sea' son by advertisement and circulars. Local Option. The petition of about thirty voters of the lower town precinct, (number seven), was filed in the county court last Monday, asking the county judge to orderan election to be held in said district, at the May election, under the "Local Option Law." The order was made as desired. The friends of Local Option who desire to test the 'question in other districts, have no time to lose in getting up and filing their petition, as they will have to be filed on or before the first Monday in April to be in time. Railroad Election. At the annual meeting of the stock holders of the Hartford Railroad and Mining Company, held at the courthouse in Hartford on Monday, the first day of March, 1875, the following officers were elected for the ensuing yean James A. Thomas, President; John P, Barrett. Secretary; E. D. Walker O. P, Johnson, L. Barrett, A. P. Hudson, John P. Tracy, A. B. Baird and John P. Bar rett, Directors. The recent heavy rains, following each other so rapidly, have thrown all the riv ers and creeks out of banks. The indi cations are that we will have higher wa ter than has been known for many years. The county roads are almost impassible. We are again under obligations to th clever and popular landlady of the Crow House, , our good friend Mrs., Vaught, for another fine luncheon sent up to us last night Mr. and Mrs: Howard Drey, of Shelby ville, Ky'., arrived in our town yesterday evening., Mrs. Grey is a daughter of Dr. John E. Pendleton of this place. THE. PROFITS OFISHEEP RAISING. An Intermtlng letter In Regard to Hhevp llnubnndry. Taylortown, Ohio Co.. Kt. 1 February 23, 1875. f Editor Hartford Herald: By your kindness, I would be pleased to give the readers of your excellent paper the result of a friendly visit I paid to my hospitable and genenerous friend, W. D. Coleman, who is, by the way, one of the most suc cessful dealers in blooded stock we have in Ohio county. For several years past he has been devoting a great deal of at tention to the improving of his hogs and sheep, and the result of his labor is a lot of hogs and sheep that it is a delight to look upon. While I was admiring the latter, I casually remarked that it was a very common idea that raising sheep was unprofitable. His reply to this was a request that I make a calculation of the profits he derived in one year on fourteen head of sheep, which 1 here present, and which may be relied on as strictly correct: Cash received for wool $ 47 85 Cash received for muttons.... 12 09 Cash received for lambs 50 00 Whole amount received $109 49 Cost of feed and time spent in feeding. .. 35 60 Gain in one year $ 79 44 From this, it is plain to see that rais ing sheep does pay, the testimony of many good farmers to the contrary notwithstanding. Just so long as farmerspermit their sheep to run in the woods in the fall till they become poor, or let them go unsheltered through the winter, with an occasional feeding or Baiting, or do not pay the proper attention to crossing the breeds, just so long will sheep raising remain un profitable. Thanking you for a small space, I remain an earnest reader and admirer of the Hsbald. H. B. T. OUR ROCKPORT LETTER. Eockpobt, Sr., Mar. 2. SWEET TLATTER7. Dear Herald: My first communica tion proving successful, encourages me to try again. Your paper is gaining friends here fast, and I hope soon to be able to send you a list of subscribers. It seems hard for the people to believe that a paper printed a t Hartford can live at alL They don't ask. Can anything good come out of Hart ford?" The Hibald has prove! that too iocontestably but Beem to fear, as I said( that it won't live long. EXCEPT ONE VAX. Your stand upon the subject of Sorghum Democracy meets with tbe most heaity approval from everybody I hare heard peak of it, but one man, and he, Heav ens I how can I record it? will not sub' scribe for tbe Herald, nor vote for any man whose election it advocates. You would naturally suppose this man had been a soldier, battling bravely through the whole war for his beloved Confedera cy, perhaps one of Gen. W'a aids-de camp not so, however. I am credibly in formed that the only battle he was ever in was at home, when his wife, armed with woman's universal weapon, the broom-stick, put him to an ignominous flight, and he took refuge under the bed, A riEST-CLASS APOLOGY. Allow me here to apologise to the "Big Judge" for what he seems to consider an affront, in my notice of him in my former communication. Now. Judge, I meant no insult nor affront, I assure you. I bad no allusion whatever to your mental bigness, but to your corporeal greatness, and J am sure that your sense of honesty and trnth will convince you that there is not so much "ridiculous absurdity" in my assertion, as you might at first have im agined. Some men, you know; Judge, are intellectual giants while mere pigmies in size, and others are the reverse. BOCK IS BOOKED OCT OF CAMP. Henry Rock's bomb-shell fell with t terrible shriek and caused great conster nation in the ranks of the faithful here about. Their wrath is terrible, their curses are not loud but deep. The im precations they heap upon him are enough to damn a State, let alone poor Henry. I attended one of their meet ings, and heard him anathematized and formally read out of the party in the fol lowing forcible and fervid language by the chairman: "Feller citzens of the great an glorus national Repubhkun party lat man dat low white man dat Henry Rock he's a trater to de coun try which General Grant djscubber an which de saintly Ben Butler fit and died an stole fur.and is now presidence of de congreshnul bobcrashun of de, nation (fur which place 1 is a candydunce per vided I kin git votes enufT). After dat white man dun bin treated as often by de cullud popelasbun, as he is, drunk as much corn-jooce at our expense, as hs is an bin shuck by de ban by epektable cullud pussens, as he is, and den becase de Demecrats wus de stronges and beat him, gits mad, like he is, an turns agin his friens, like he is, an goes .off an jines de enemy, like he is, all dis chile's got to say is. let 'im go. Damph I keer. Let b go an licker." "COME UNTO MB." Now, Mr. Editor, what, allow me to ask, is to become of Bro. Rock ? He won't go into the Sorghum ranks, and he is far too clever and nice a man to be left to drift about at the mercy of the tide and every strong wind that blows. You must take him in and christen him into full fellowship. Terhaps he will be unabl to 'stand strong meat at first, but a few dishes of Gruelfle) will bring him aroun all right, and he will make a very re spcctable Democrat. I am well acquainted with him and can vouch for him after baptism. I would recommend tho', that, when you baptize him, you soak mm wen. jtcMpcviiuiiy, -r, AUGUST ELECTOS, 1875. Auditor Public Accounts. Fayette Hewitt, of Hardin county, Is a can didate for th office of Auditor of Publio Ac counts at tho August election, 1875. Subject to the action of the Democratic (Jonvontion called fur May 6, 1875. Register of tbe Land Office. C. J. Hinkle, of Shelby county is a eandi- ate for Register of the Land OEo. Subject to the action of tho Democratic Party. E, P. BARNETT, PRACTICAL SURVEYOR, HARTFORD, KY. Would respectfully announce to the people of Ohio county that ho li prepared, stall timet. to do any kind or surveying, running lines, laying off lands and lots, Ac. at sh.ott notice. Terms reasonable and to suit times. not 2m THE CROW HOUSE, Opposite the Courthouse H1RTFOED, XT, VAUOHT k HUDSON, .... PsoMirroits. Comfortable rooms, prompt attention, ana low prices. Tho traveling publio are respect fully lnvitea to gtve us a snare 01 patronage. .Every exertion maae to renacr guests comiori- able. STAGE LIVE. Vauzht k Hudson also run a stage twice a day between Hartford and Beaver Dam. morning and evening, connecting with all passenger trains on the L. P. k Southwestern rail-Toad. Passengers set down wherever they desire, not ly wi. bakdwicx, a. t. sail. HARD WICK fc NAIL, DEALIB3 IS DRY GOODS, GROCERIES, HATS, CAPS, UUUiS, BllUttS, ilAKUWAKE, QUEENSWARE, Ao. Which we will sell low for cash.or exchange or country proauce, papmg tne mgnesl marker price. noliy SETII THOMAS CLOCKS. If you want a (rood clock at a moderate price, send for our new illustrated price list of Seth Thomas cloeks. Clocks securely packed and sent to -any address at our risk on receipt oi price ana mty cents .aaaitiooai tor express enarges. aioney may be sent sateiy ny regis. tered letter or express. . C.P. BARNE3 A- BRO.. Jewelers,Main st., bt. 6th k 7th,Louisvllle.Ky. J. F. COIXINS. DIALXB IN GROCERIES, COFECTIONERIES, &C, (SC. COUNTRY PRODUCE Bought at i The Highest Market Price. Tt.mnmbnr tbnnl!e. weit ildannblie sauare. opposite tne court nouie, iiaruoru, ay. nol ly. Z. WAYNE GRIFFIN. HARTFORD, KY. Dealer in Drugs, Medicine and Chemicals, Fine Toilet Soaps, Fancy Hair and Tooth- iJrusn es, renumery ana f anoy xoiiei Articles, Trasses and Shoulder Braces, Garden. Sped. Pure Wines and Liquors for medical purposes Paintt, Oils, Varnishes, Bye1 Stuffs, Letter-paper, Fens, Ink, Envelopes, Glass ratty, I'aroon on, imps ana vnimneys. Physicians' prescriptions accurately com' poun ded; nol ly WM. 11. WIIXIAJIS, Dealer in DRY GOODS, GROCERIES, .Hardtttire, Quccnsware, Hats and Caps, Boots and Shoes. Also dealers in leaf Tobacco, ! HARTFORD, KY. I will sell verv low for cash, or exchange for all kinds of country produce. My motto is" Quick sales ant small pronu. noi jy GREAT BARGAINS To be had during tho next 30 days, in DRY GOODS, CLOTHING, BOOTS, SHOES, HATS, CAPS AND NOTIONS. We are determined to close out In order-to matte room for our Spring Block. L. ROSENBE.RQ 4 BRO All kinds of Country Prodae taken in ex change for goods. jam 4w WB. I'. GREGORY. (County Judge.) ATTORNEY AT LAW, HARTFORD, KY. Prompt attention given to the collection of claims. Office In 'he courthouse. jkssx k. roan. Hartford, Ky. w. if. swtutT, Owensbors, Ky. FOGLE fc SWEENEY, ATTORNEYS AT LA W, HARTFORD, KY. Will praottee their profession In Ohio and adjoining counties and in the Court of Appeals. Office on Market street, near courthouse JOHN 0'FL,AIIEHXY. ATTORNEY AT LAW, HARTFORD, KY. Collections Promptly Attended to OSes on Market street, over Jlaurr's tin shop. jan20 ly JOHN P. BARRETT, ATTORNEY AT LAW, and Reat Gstato Agent, HARTFORD, KENTUCKY. Prompt attention riven to the collection of claims. Will buy, sell, lease, or rent lands or mineral privileges on reasonable terms. Will write aeeds. mortgages, leases, Sec, and at tend to listing and paying taxeson lands belonging to non-residents. r. r. KoBaur, o. c wissbia. MORGAN A WEDDING, ATTORNEYS AT LAW, HARTFORD, KY. (Office, west of courthouse over Hardwick A Nail's store. Will practice in inferior and superior courts of this commonwealth Special attention given to eases is bank ruptcy. F. P. Morgan Is also examiner, and will take depositions correctly will be ready to oblige all parties at all times. BKHST O. Mcn.SBT, UU. X. DILI. McIIENRY fe miX. ATTORXBYS& COUNSELLORS AT LA W HARTFORD, KY. Will practice la Ohio and adiolnlne counties. ana in tne court or Appeals or Aentueiy. not ly. D.H. FRENCH. ATTORNEY AT LAW. AXO I SAL XSTATX AO EXT, HARTFORD, KENTUCKY. Prompt attention given to the eolloetlen of Claims. Will practice in all the courts of Ohi and adjoining eeunties. Will buy, sell, lease, or rent real estate or mineral prlvueges on. reasonable terms. nol lj X. D. WALIIIB, X. C. BCSSAXS. WALKER t HUBBARD, A2T0RINEYS AT LAW, AXD RIAL XSTATS A0I5T3, HARTFORD, KENTUCKY. nol la JOHN C. TOWNSEXD. (Formerly County Judge,) ATTORNEY AT LAW, HARTFORD, KY. Will practice in all the courts of Ohio eonnty ana tne circuit courts 01 tne sin judicial dis trict, ssoi mess solicited and prompt attention guaranteed. E. SMALL'S TRADE PALACE, HARTFORD, KY. Dealer in Staple and Fancy Dry Goods, Gents and boys custom-mads CLOTHING. A No. 1 stock of BOOTS AND SHOES, HATS AND CAPS, FURNISHING GOODS, CLOAKS, BLANKETS, FURS, NO HONS, AC. I also, keep a large and well selected stook of Ladies' Dress Goods, Sold at New York Price. All kinds of COUNTRY PRODUCE Bought at the highest market price. ! II 'I BBBBBBBBBli wBaBBsl w mm V ID wA Jl Plain solid lS-kt. Gold Engagement and Wedding Rings furnished to order promptly; also Set Rings, with AmethisU Garnet, Topsu, Moss Agate, Pearl or Diamond settings. Plain Gold 18-kt. Rings from $3 to $15 each. In ordering, measure the largest joint of the finger you desire fitted with a narrow piece of paper, and send ns the paper. We inscribe any name, motto, er date free of charge. Rings sent by mail on receipt of price, or by express, with bill to collect ontuelivery of goods. Money may be sent safely by Express, PosUoBce Money Order, or Registered Letter. Refer to George W. Bain. C. P. BARNES i Bro., Jewelers, Main st.,bt. th&7tb, LoulaTllU.Ky. B. P. BERRYXAN, Fashionable Tailor, ;hartford, ky; Coats, Pants, and Vests cut, made and re paired in mo oeii siyiv ai iuv luncsfc fiiuvi. noil J rajs a 0jrmln TVAtrsU". WATCir. fn 1 ax. ea!n fir' htiac . Hsi4 fr of saw lUsstrat fiv List. '41'afl,StetCiM, t'Uia (M Hiar. otft OMtm.. 8LhThoma CWki, UdW Hatch. CjTKitrj mt. tctrrmatsi. (soW Vt expru C. O. D-. n Ijflet. (if 4in4), t wiuliitita ta4rTovftl l-foTrAiaf. F fear M BVsv, JVwIw a. 1875 AGAIN 1 1875 LOUISVILLE WEllltLY COUEIER-JOTJENAL Continues for the present yAr IU liWsl ar. r.ngeraent, whereby, on the Slit of December, 1875. it will distribute Impartially among its subscribers 8lO;O0O in presents, comprising greenbacks and noarlr one thousand useful and beautiful artietrs. The Courier Journal is a lum-eitiblished lire, wide-awakr, progressive, newsy, bright and spicy paper. No other paper offers such Inducements to subscribers and elub agents. Cirestars with full particulars and specimen copies sent fre on applieatisn. Aerms, 52 uo a year and liberal offers to grids. Daily edition $12. Postaea prrnaid on all papers without extra charge. Address IV. ti, 11ALDK11 Aji, . President Courier-Journal Company Louisville, Ky. 1 ROYAL IXSUBAXCE COXPAXT L1TERPOOL. Security and Indemnity. CAPITAL.-SIO.OOO.OOO GOLLV 3C -. Cash Assets, ovmt $12,000.000 Gold.' Cash Assets m V. &, $1,837,9S4 Gold. Losses paid without discount, refer to 13th con dition 01 uompany 1 pouey. BARBEE k CASTLEMAN, General" Agflli liouisvuie, Kentuoty.-' BARRETT A. BRO., Afrentav ' - HARTFORD, KY.. JOSEPH TAUGHT. BLACKSMITH,.- HARTFORD, KT. ' AU kinds of Blaoksmithing doss in, good - style and at the lowest price foraasa only. . - HORSE-SHOEING made a specialty. Will shoe all reondtor ft .! not ly . Plaw Stacklnf . and - ; , GENERAL WOODWORK!. The'tmderslfned' would resneetfuBy1 an nounce to the eitisens of Ohio county-,- that tbey are now prepared to da sil kinds or WOODWORK at their new shop is Hartford. They have s cured the services of a competent workman to STOCK PLOWS, and they guarantee satisfaction, both. as to wo ax "and nicis, hi all esses. Tiey will make WAGONS AND- BUGGIES, and wilt make and furnish- COFFINS AND BURIAL CASES at the lowest possible prices. Call and see us before engaging your work elsewhere. PATRON AQE. SOLICITED, and satisfaction guaranteed. By close applies..-tion to business we hope to merit the support of our friends, MA VZY k HURT. Jan. 20,1875. jaSO ly JOHX P. TRACY A. SOX. UNDERTAKERS, HARTFORD, KY, Manufacturers and dealers In alt kinds of wooden coffins, from the finest rose wood casket to I he cheapest pauper coffin. All kinds of coffin trimmings constantly oa hand and for sale. . Keep a fin heano always ready.to attend fnuerals. Wgons and Buggies, constantly oa hand or made to order. Parti-i ular attention given to plow stocking. --' . nol ly J. T. YAGER, Sale and Livery Stable, HARTFORD, KY. I desire to Inform the eitisens of Hartford, and vicinity that 1 am'prspared to furnish Saddle and Harness Stock, Buggies and conveyances of all kinds on the most reasonable terms. Horses taken to feed or board by the day, week or month. A liberal share of patronage solid, ted. nol ly X. J. lYOX. Dealer in Groceries and frnfedioneriea. HARTFORD, KY. Keen constant) on hand a larew assortment of all kinds of Groceries and Confection eries, ' which he will sell low for cash, or exchange for all kinds of COUNTRY PRODUCE I will also par the highest cash price for hides, sheep pelts, eggs, huttsr.bacon, potatoes, beans, eto. ualJ JAS. A. THOKAJ, OtO. A. TJ-ATT JAS. A. THOMAS & CO. HARTFORD, KY. i . 4 Dealers in. staple andjncy Notions, Fancy Goods, "Clothing, Boots and Shoes, Hats and Csps. A luge assortment of these goods-kept eonstaatly on' hand, and; i)l be sold at the very lowest wuh price, nolly r.iLiiM m

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