The Pittsburgh Press from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania on October 5, 1919 · Page 78
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The Pittsburgh Press from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania · Page 78

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Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
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Sunday, October 5, 1919
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Page 78
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Advertisements in This Section Were Received Too Late for Insertion in the Main Classified Section, Which Will Be Found in Another Part of Toda y's Paper. To Appear in the Main C. - fied Section, Which Will , n Y ft a 1 T . t T round in Anower ran 01 dav's Paner. Coov Must Be THE PITTSBURG PRESS i. Turned in by 6 P. M. Each Friday. PAGES ONE TO EIGHT PITTSBURG. PA., SUNDAY MORNING, OCTOBER 5, 1919 PAGES ONE TO EIGHT msirij?j NEW YORK'S CRIME WAVE ALARMING CITY; ACTRESS IS KEEN FOR PITTSBURG By 0. 0. Mclntyre. . Special Correspondent THE PRESS. New Tork, Oct. 4. The police and the populace are unable to explain the sudden crime wave that is weeping New York. It is particularly an offshoot of the underworld and for daring it has never been equalled. Bank tellers are stuck-up In broad daylight, men and women are held up in the street before dark and after, messenger boys walk off with more than a million dollars In securities In a month. Black-jacking is not confined to dark alleyways any more. Two young men In the latest Broadway clothes stepped up to the cashier of the Btrand Roof at noon this week and poked guns under ". his nose. When he showed resistance they slugged him and walked A off with $3,000. Thirty feet away young couples were employing the noon hour tn jazzing to the tune of a brass band. There Is no question, acording to tho health commissioner of New Tork, about more drugs being used than ever since prohibition became effective and some of the police officials believe that most of the crimes are the work of drug fiends. However, the three hotel bandits who robbed eight hotels in a week by the stick-up method were not dope fiends it was found when they were caught. There are many reasons offered for the sudden reign of lawlessness. One disciple of Freud writing to a New Tork newspaper, declares that repression of the people Is responsible for the wave of crime that Is sweeping the world and points to the Chicago and Omaha race riots as being impossible under non-prohibition. "It has been proved," he writes, "that when you repress a people they suddenly burst out In a spasm of violence. This will continue until legislators learn to keep their hands off." Another view is that many of the hold-up men arrested are soldiers who have been out of Jobs since they left the service and la many Instances they complain that their family ties have been broken up and they are going to make society pay. Still others believe ft Is a Bolshevistic plan. "Whatever it is. It is making the metropolis unsafe for the Wayfarer. People are being slugged and robbed right in the heart of the city while the police are down In the East Side coffee houses creaking up harmless stuss games and smashing HP the furniture. David Lefkovltch is an office boy In the employ of one of the. morning papers printed on Park Row. David hadn't held the Job long, but being an assiduous sort of a person, and of husky stature he received that raest Important Job of gate boy. A grate boy sits at the door leading to the editorial rooms and any person desiring to see an editor must first, give his name to the gate boy, who may forward It to the editor. . During the actors' strike four impressive looking gentlemen entered the offices where David holds forth and asked that they be escorted to the office of the managing editor. "Who wants to see him?" demanded David. "Just say Mr. Belasco and three of his friends," was the answer. David took Mr. Belasco"s card and looked it over. Then he looked over Mr. Belasco's friends. "What is it y want to see him about?" demanded David with a show of belligerence. "Just say It's David Belasco and Harrison Gray Klske and George Broadhurst and Louis Mann," was Mr. Belasco's sharp reply. Nutin' etlrrtn' " "snapped Lefkovltch," unless you tell me your busi-ness. "Just say we're Mr. Mann. David Lefkovltch's scorn was magnificent. He turned away for a moment and then eyed Mr. Mann baleful- iy. "Actors? What are you, anyway? A aartetr Screen scouts who have been hunting around New Tork for beautiful grotesque faces for the movies report that most of the beautiful faces are found In Brooklyn and they are owned by the working girls. Many of the lucky candidates have been asked to take- a course of train ing and later will be sent to Universal city and when' they have full developed will be sent to the Italian studios wheVe the big Roma-New York Pictures Corporation is making pictures for Russia and the near Orient. Thousands of new movie actors are going to be needed when the foreign films are being made regularly. America, it Is admitted, has the best directors and the best ideas and the American director wants his own people to direct. Many of the artists and writers are buying islands up in Maine to escape the high cost of living. An island may be secured up there for $o00 and-a house erected for about $1,500. And as John T. McCutcheon said when he bought a South Sea island "it is a nice thing to have to refer to." Speaking of the movies here is a good Arnold Daly story, Mr. Daly was doing a motion picture and stopped in front of a Fifth ave. home. After ringing the bell he asked the butler for the man of the house and when that puffing dignitary arrived Mr. Daly asked permission to do a scene in front of his home. He was promptly refused. "But do you know who I am? I am Arnold Daly." "It wouldn't make any difference if you were Charlie Chaplin" replied the man slamming the door with a bang. Pittsburg might well employ Miss Helen Curry, daughter of Thomas Curry, of the Belasco offices, as a super press agent. Miss Curry believes that Pittsburg Is the garden spot of the world, despite the fact that for years she had prejudices against the city. But shewent to Pittsburg and saw and was conquered. "I prefer it to any city I have ever visited" she says. "Recently I played there at the Al-vin and one evening Miss Gertrude Gordon of The Press called to Interview me. I was rather pouty about being away from New Tork and Miss Gordon decided to show me the real Pittsburg. "The next day I saw the many beautiful homes, the stores and shops and among other things the exhibition of wonderful impressionistic .Pittsburg paintings by Edward Trumbull' in a department store. Then we walked to the Point where I saw the great rivers r coming together. Across the Point bridge we walked and up the Duquesne ' Heights incline, I saw the city from the heights of Mt. Washington it was one of the mqst inspiring sights I ever saw, even surpassing the famous inspiration point on Riverside drive. I also took In the magnificent views at Schenley and Highland parks and around Se-wickley heights." " - Miss Curry in private life is the wife of Fred R. Buckley, a well known writer of fiction. W. & J. INSTALLS DR. S. C. BLACK ON OCTOBER 22 ning. This will take place In the gymnasium. Although formal invitations will be issued to every alumnus of the college the exercises will be open to the public and everyone Is. heartily Invited. Washington' & Jefferson college opened Wednesday, Sept. 24, and the president-elect had the privilege of welcoming the largest number of students in the history of the Institution. There are almost 400 and it is expected that the registration will "go over the top" of that number, which has long been the goal of Robert M. Murphy, college secretary. The new students total 172, 17 of whom entered the three upper classes. The freshman class of 155 is by far the largest entering class In the life of the college. That of a year ago, which was th largest up to that time, numbered only 122. The enrollment is Increased also by the return to school of a large number of service men. TO RAISE ENDOWMENT. On the recommendation of MaJ. Black the board of trustees has Just inaugurated a campaign for $2,500,000. Its present - endowment Is $1,029,000, besides buildings and grounds valued at about $300,000. "The money Is needed for the addition of new chairs, to meet Increased attendance, and the demand for somewhat extended courses, the provision of scholarships for needy men, the building and equipment of certain buildings used for many years, the establishment of a chair for Bible study and missions and a department of economics and public service," said Dr. Black. Already the alumni organization has launched a movement of which John McCarney Kennedy, of the First National Bank building, Pittsburg, is secretary. In brief . it is that each alumnus shall pay the Alumni organization $5.00 each year until his death. . "Dr. Black, the new president. Is taking hold energetically," wrote Mr. Kennedy, and added, "He has a huge task and should not be expected to swing it alone; let's help him." HAS VARIED CAREER. MaJ. Black succeeds In the presidency the Rev. ' Dr. Frederick W. Hinitt, who after an incumbency of three years left and assumed the pas torate of the First Presbyterian church, Indiana, Pa. Maj. Black comes to the college presidency with unusual equipment In the way of experience. He has been a soldier, an administrator, a pastor, an author, a lecturer, a professor and a business man. Added to this he is one of the youngest college presidents , In the United States. He was 50, years old Sept. 6, last. Dr. Black was one of the few clergymen commissioned In the United States army In a branch other than the chaplain corps. It was at Camp Gordon, near Atlanta, where MaJ. Black made his military record. The work of Dr. Black among the men attracted . the attention of the officers at the camp, with the result that he was made morals officer there early in 1913. He was commissioned major first In the government Intel" ligence department, of which . th morals work was then a division. On the organization of the Moral" branch, MaJ. Black was transferred to it, and remained there until ti enel of his war service. v Dr. Black Is the author of numerou religious books among which are "Plain Answers to Religious Questions Modern Men are Asking," "Building a Working Church." and "Progress la Christian Culture." He Is also a contributor to magazines on religious subjects. - Except for a few weeks last summer when he took a trip to Alaska, MaJ. Black has been steadily "on the job" at his college since June 7, last. When not In his office Dr. Black It traveling about preaching or lecturing in the interest of that institution. HOLY NAME SOCIETY PLANS BIG RALLY actors" suggested - 1 ..MM' v " .. i . 1 DISCOVERED A CURE FOR ASTHMA Ckemlat Discovers a Simple Home Remedy for Asthma d Makes a Generous Offer. Mr. D. J. Dane, a chemist located at 800 Lane bldg., St. Marys, Kan., has discovered .a simple home remedy for Asthma. To test It be sent soma to people who had been suffering from Asthma for years, and to their delight they state they were easily cured. Mr. Lane is so proud of his discovery and has so much confidence in Its ability to cure that he will send a $1.25 bottle postpaid to anyone who will write for it. His offer is that he is to be paid for It if it cures. The one taking it la to be the Judge and report its effect within 10 days after using the remedy. If you suffer from Asthma write for a bottle at once. Send no money. Just your name and address To Have Curly, Wavy Hair Like 'Nature's Own' KEV. IGNATIUS SMITH. From reports received by the committees of arrangement for the big rally and mass meeting of the Holy Name society,' scheduled for next Sundas afternoon in the Exposition building, a full attendance is assured from all parts of the diocese of Pittsburg. Admiral W. S. Benson, who intends taking his vacation in the Sewlckley Valley with relatives, will talk on the principle of : self-determination for small nations. Rev. Ignatius Smith, director general of ' the Holy Name societies in America, -though young, is known as one of the great preachers of the order. JUDGE REID CHAIRMAN. Henry Fitzpatrlck, chairman of the Holy Name council, will present Judge Ambrose B. Held of the Allegheny county bench, who will conduct the meeting, which will open at 2:30 In the afternoon. Bishop Cane-vin will be present andj make a short address. N . Despite the demands for a parade, Bishop Canevin decided to put off the procession this year on account of so many Sunday parades. In this he was Joined by the executive board of the society. T. A. Walsh Is secretary of the meeting. The Very Rev. Dr. Francis J. McCabe is the spiritual director. .DR. SAMUEL CHARLES BLACK. Rev. Dr. Samuel Charles Black, formerly a major in the United States army, will be inaugurated as president of historic Washington and Jefferson college, Washington, Pa., on Wednesday, Oct. 22. This institution of learning is only 31 miles from Pittsburg and many of its citizens are among her alumn!. Seven of the board of trustees of the college are residents of Pittsburg. Maj. Black was elected to the college presidency Good Friday last, and assumed his new duties with com mencement, June 1, last. At that time be preached the baccalaureate sermon and made his first public appearance as head of the institution. MILESTONES IX IIISTORV. Almost three thousand invitations will be issued for the inauguration, and the program has grown until the function will be one of the milestones in the 11S years' history of the college. The inauguration proper will take place at half past ten o'clock in the gymnasium of the college. Judge 'James I. Brownson, of the Appellate court, will preside, and Judge John A. Mcllvaine will propound the constitutional questions. Maj. Black will take the oath of office and then will deliver his inaugural address. He has chosen as his subject, "Shall College Education be Humanized?" There will be addresses delivered by the Rev. Dr. William C. Thompson, president of Ohio Statcuniversity, Columbus, Ohio, and by the Rev. Dr. Edgar P. Hill, now the secretary of the general education board of the Presbyterian church. It was Dr. Thompson who first suggested the name of Dr. Black for the presidency. The headquarters of Dr. Hill are now in New York city, but until recently he labored In Chicago. A. luncheon will be served at noon. In the afternoon at .half past two o'clock there will be a general discussion of educational problems. Chancellor Samuel Black McCormick of the University of Pittsburg, and an alumnus of W. & J., will be the presiding officer. Last June the University of Pittsburg at its commencement honored W. & J. college by conferring the degree of doctor of laws upon MaJ. Black. - Suppers will be served by class groups to be arranged by their own members. At eight o'clock the same evening a memorial and recognition service will be held for Washington and Jefferson men who served in the recent war. As soon as full data can be secured, a bronze tablet con taining these names will be placed in the chapel. A second part of these exercises will be an address telling of the service of the more than eight hundred W. & J. men who were in the war and who still live. RECEPTION IN EVENING. A reception by the new president will be held from half past nine to half past eleven o'clock the same eve- Women who have trouble keeping: their hair In curl, or -of . securing the desired wavy effect and especially those who realise the harm that the hot iron does to the hair will do well to try plain liquid sllmerine. In no other way can they acquire such pretty waves and curia, having all the appearance of "Nature's own." And the hair, instead of being: singed, ragged or dead looking, has such a lively lustre snd wholesome beauty. If one will get a bottle of liquid sllmerine at any drug store and follow the accompanying directions, she will be simply deligntsd with the result. This product Is f caua perfectly harmless, and there Is nothlnjr sticky, greasy or unpleasant about i. IM fcadr will so Ua masajeaWe. n tii art- im wbas tiatilaa Is Is asm sju FINEVIEW WILL HOLD EVENT FOR ITS HEROES. Fineview, a little community of about 1,000 persons on top of old Nunnery hill, Northside, will hold a celebration in honor of Its returned United States service men, Oct. 10 and 11. Out of this little settlement, 119 ment went to the war as soldiers; sailors and- marines. Three were killed. . A street fair will be held, also street dancing. A bronze tablet will be erected at Meadville and Tacoma sts. and dedicated with appropriate ceremonies. A volunteer band will give the music The whole affair has been planned and arranged by Mrs. Mary Coll of 102 Henderson St., Northside, and Mrs. Xura Showalter, 215 Bell ave, Northside Cold. Catarrh, Asthma. Quickly Relieved by Mil X. Ill J S A itr a remeoy that Is auto matically administered as you breathe. And without discomfort, or Inconvenience. Each breath carries medication that quickly healp the afflicted parts. THIS NEW DISCOVERY AND INVENTION Is giving relief when all other methods fail. Used with ' won-de 1 success in treating all diseases of the Nose.-Throat and Lungs. Also for Head ''Noises and Ear Troubles. Relief is .guaranteed or No Pay. 1 kHAIL THE COUPON. Frederick HeUman Go. ; Box 4, Johnstown, Pa. Please Sea Me Pre Booklet Name Address , Come Tomorrow For AIT TlJ. FOR ONLY Mattress J r.mz. Fav GOc Weekly Kational Springs .... C.9S All Feather Pillmoa, per yatr 3.49 Bimmon'a Drop-aide Sanitary Couch and Pad $1S.75 In Our Rug Department You'll Find 9x12 Reversible Rugs, at $13.50 $xl2 Brussels Rugs, priced j. as low as.. $22.50 Room-size Velvets for. .$35.00 V - r - Credit Is the Base of Our Home Furnishing System R iALPH WALDO EMERSON has given us many powerful epigrams, but none more literally true than the one quoted in the illustration on trie left, and none which finds more perfect application than in the sale of furniture on credit, which is the very base of our home comforts of today. The great height to which the American home has reached in recent years with its beautiful furniture and modem conveniences and comfort is due almost entirely to the broad application of credit. Today in this country where the credit plan is almost universally in vogue, the home of the. average working man possesses more beautiful furniture and more modern conveniences than th.e workman's home of any other nation. . When Uncle Sam decided to sell his Liberty Bonds on the partial payment plan basis, he gave the fullest recognition to a business principle which has worked out so successfully in the development of the home life of millions of people. . Life for those sa tkeSKado w of Deaf li JewisMVar Relief Campaign Our Credit Makes it Easy for Yon to Ows a Piano or Player- $700 PLAYER $350 $3.00 Weekly. Bench, Scarf, 15 Rolls Music Standard make player; used (or demonstrating purposes. You will be astonished at this remarkable value. We have only the one. so please act quick. Chickering . . $ 1 O C Ivers & Pond $ 1 fi C rI St Werkly (Coed WW (Cord) t Weekly ITa a Chlclterlng-- And at th price Is the most remarkably otter of tbla a a. la. "We cot ttata pta.no in trade on one of our Schubert playera. Stool aad Scarf Free Please do not mljuSe the valae of tbla Instrument on account of tho low price. yo'U be ajrreeabiy aurpriaed to find this fine piano In splendid condition. Stool and Scarf Free p zz- I May -Stern's 4-Piece Modern Colonial Rr?i-nrm Suit- olirl Oa L- t il -we -wasm aa m o o o o Terms $2 per week m n Ik a wens S-lm. 40-fm. Dicasea with 22x30 plate mirrors 32-4 a. CkUTorette with 2 deep trays and 4 roomy di DtCMlag- Takle wltk MxaO tlate Mirror aad a. roll alse, handsomely designed bed. We almost tyae up hope of ever seeing these suites. We placed our order over 8 months ag tor 162 suites. Just like the above illustration, at a price that is exactly 30 less than the present mrket price. After many delays the suites reached us last week and are now on sale. Here is, indel, a glorious opportunity to furnish your bedroom in excellent taste at a phenomenal saving in prici i l f-. r May-Stern's 9-Piece Queen Anne J Dining Room Suite Brown Sumatra Oak SERVING TABLE EXTRA Above is illustrated one of the splendid examples in Dining Room Furniture created in the beautiful Queen Anne period design and finished in Grand Rapids newest and very popular shade of Brown-Sumatra Oak. The oblong table measures 59 inches long and when extended will seat 10 people. Chairs are upholstered in genuine Spanish leather. PER WEEK ONLY $2 Delivers this full-size Cabinet Model Columbia Grafo nola 20 together with Selections on 10 Doable-disc, 85c COLUMBIA RECORDS A Total Cost of 8108.50. McDOUGALL KITCHEN CABINETS The McDougall is acclaimed everywfcre as the world's most perfect kitchen b-inet. - SOLD EXCLUSIVELY AT MAY-STE3TS Despite its supremacy over all ther makes, they cost no more, besides we rant the most liberal credit terms. A PARLOR BY DAY A BEDROOM BY NIGHT 15-piece Crystal, Oven-Glass Baking Set FREE with any Range or Heater From $25.00 and up Liberal Credit laurel Combination Coal and Gas Raa.. with warming: closot, like cut. Jewel Combination Coal and (aa Range with- warming-closet, like cut. CD Aetra Combination Coal and Gaa Ranare with . warming- clonet,. S98 S105 S125 TotOTr Combination O n 1 and Gaa Heater like cut the most :. marvelous double-fuel heater ever invented, " $39.50 Thte Splen- . a., ..- wllnV J Heater BOe TpSnf1' Weekly QrL' Cast - Iron CPn fl heatlnsr bowl 1 1 J - an top lr- C""PVd- tight base jPZITjT' ; 1 r a - flra $9.75 4 .'' V Four-Piece Divan-Bed Parlor Outfit $1.50 Per Week Pays for It .No suite of furniture made gives the amount of service this Duofold I Suite renders. The useful Library Table serves many purposes, the comfortabUArtfif Chair and perfectly balanced "Rocker are unsurpassed for luxuriousriess and the Duofql answers a. two-fold purpose that of a Reclining Couch by day and a full size ,comfortableed at night. What greater service can anyone expect? This splendidly designed Suite. gtraneed for durabihty, is' offered' by us for considerably less than its present market priceand'a dollar fifty a week pays for it. , MAY, STERN & CO. all the credit you want 914-920 PENN ANUE v.. 7 L :

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