The Advocate-Messenger from Danville, Kentucky on March 13, 1984 · Page 5
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The Advocate-Messenger from Danville, Kentucky · Page 5

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Danville, Kentucky
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Tuesday, March 13, 1984
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Page 5
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THE ADVOCATE MESSENGER, Danville, Kentucky, Tuesday, March 13, 1984 5 usoiraess Discrimination suit against McDonald's could change its franchising practices By TAMAR LEWIN 1984 N.Y. Times News Service LOS ANGELES - Charles Grif-fis came to California in 1977 when he heard he might be able to buy a McDonald's franchise in Santa Barbara. He had completed a training program for the restaurant chain, but was operating his own gasoline station in Michigan at the time. It turns out, though, that the store was in Los Angeles, "on Santa Barbara Street, right in the middle of the ghetto," says Griffis. "It was an old store in real bad shape." Griffis bought it anyway, and over the next four years he added three more McDonald's franchises in the inner-city of Los Angeles. Now he is in danger of losing them. McDonald's, which asserts that Griffis is involved in two Popeye's fried chicken outlets, is suing him for breaking a no-compete clause in the franchise contract. But Griffis is fighting back : he filed a race discrimination countersuit that could shake up the hamburger chain's franchising practices. He asserts that blacks are systematically kept from buying stores in white neighborhoods. The case comes down to a basic disagreement: McDonald's says it is being sensitive to black leaders' requests when it sends black business people into inner-city neighborhoods, but Griffis says that sensitivity confines him and other black business people to the ghetto. His suit is being watched with interest by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored approach. "McDonald's experience with its restaurants has supported the belief that successful operation for both the franchisee and McDonald's is maximized by the franchisee's personal involvement not only in the restaurant but also in the neighborhood community, by sensitivity to the stores customers and employees and their perception that, as an entrepreneur and an employer, the franchisee is contributing to the betterment of the community," the company said. "Community representatives have voiced similar concerns to McDonald's." McDonald's already has more black franchisees than most other fast-food chains. While trade publications say blacks own slightly more than 1 percent of the nation's franchised restaurants, almost 9 percent of McDonald's owners are black. "Right now, 31 percent of the people in some phase of training to be McDonald's franchise owners are minorities," Miss Skurdy said. Still, while company figures show that the average franchise owner has five stores, Griffis says the system's 137 black operators have 267 restaurants, or only about two apiece on average. Griffis got four but wanted more. In 1982, he sought a fifth franchise in Los Angeles and was turned down, and then he applied for a Popeye's franchise for his wife, Patricia. Six months later. McDonald's sued him for breach of contract, citing the franchise agreement's clause that prohibits involvement with another fast-food chain. fined to inner-city areas with high maintenance and security costs, and were usually offered only recycled stores, which are generally more expensive and less profitable than new ones. And last year, the New York chapter of the Black McDonald's Operators Association wrote the New York regional vice president to complain that black McDonald's owner-operators are primarily confined to ghetto areas and not allowed to expand as fast as their white counterparts. Griffis, who is 39 years old, said: "When I applied to join McDonald's, they said they had separate lists for black applicants and white applicants, because they had trouble fitting blacks into the system. You don't even hear about stores coming up in white neighborhoods. "My stores are in hellholes," he said. "They get robbed once or twice a month, and I pay $20,000 a month in security services they don't pay in good neighborhoods. We had a murder in one and we still get the windows smashed and the bathrooms vandalized. I've upgraded my stores a lot and I don't see why I shouldn't have a shot at a store in a good neighborhood." McDonald's says it is not that simple. "In any franchising decision, we do want the best person for the community, and that's someone the community respects," said Miss Skurdy. "If the area is highly populated by Hispanics or blacks, that might be a black or a Hispanic operator." In pretrial documents, McDonald's elaborated on that People, the Rev. Jesse Jackson and black fast-food franchisees across the country. For black groups, what makes the case interesting is the chance to put pressure on McDonald's to find more minority franchisees and suppliers. "We are very concerned about what seems to be McDonald's redlining in the Los Angeles area, and we are collecting information nationwide," said John T. McDonald 3d, the Los Angeles director of the NAACP. "We are considering some sort of boycott against white-owned McDonald's. We want to see blacks getting their fair share, both as suppliers and as franchise owners. Right now, out of 137 black franchise operators nationwide, only one is in a white area." McDonald's says that is not true. "We certainly have more than one black operator in a white neighborhood," said Stephanie Skurdy, a spokesman for the chain. "We don't keep numbers and I don't know exactly how you'd define a white neighborhood, anyway, so I'm not going to get into a numbers game. We are still not satisfied with our minority participation, but we are far above others in the industry." Nonetheless, McDonald's racial practices, and Griffis's situation in particular, have become something of a cause in black business circles. Two years ago, Jackson wrote McDonald's on behalf of his Operation PUSH to complain that blacks felt they were "being subjected to a double standard" in that they were con Money back General Motors Chairman Roger Smith, right, looks over some drawings with electrical designer Richard Edward after Smith personally delivered some of the first checks of the new profit sharing program at the No. 1 U.S. automaker Monday morning. Edward's check amounted to $431.67 after taxes. Markets N.Y. Stock Exchange Wachov Cp 42', 42', 42', .WalMart s 34'; 34-. 34', WestPtPep 43' 1 43 43 Westgh El 46"'. 46', 46'. Weverhsr 31', 31', 31', WiiinMix s 30', 29', 30', Woolworth 13', 33 33'. Wnglev 45', 45'; 45', Xerox "Cp 40'. 40 4o' , ml WHITE STAG SPRINGS BEAUTIFUL ARE (i Grain futures CHICAGO ' AP' Futures trading on the Chicago Board of Trade Monday Open High Low Settle Chg. WHEAT ri.uoo bu minimum; dollars per bushel Mar 3 53'; 3.55 3.50 3 50' , (H Ma 3 52 3 54 3 49 3 49' , 05', Jul 3 43'; 3 45', 3 41'; 3 42 (13 Sep 3 47' , 3 49' 1 3 45 3 45'; 03 Dec 3 61' ; 3 64 3 till 3 61 01 Mar 3 69'; 3 73 3 69'.. 3 70 Prev sales 10.844 Prev day's open int 56.086. up 581 CORN 5.WM) bu minimum: dollars per bushel Mar 3 43'; 3 45 3 42'- 3 424 01', May 3 44 3 45'-; 3 42'; 3 43 -III', Jul 3 40', 3 42'; 3 39'.- 3 40'.. 01 Sep 3 10'-.. 3 13' ; 3 10' , 3 12' , , ' Dec 2 91 2.94', 2 91 2 01 ' . Mar 3 00 3031, 3 00 3 03 , 01 ' -.. May 3 06', 3 06'; 3 05', 3 06', t or, Prev sales 50.217 Prev day's open int 195.432. up 3. 573 OATS 5.0OU bu minimum: dollars per bushel Mar 1 79'; 1 81' 1 79'. 1 ; Mav Jul Sep Dec Prev 1 77'; 1 78'-. 1 76', 1 77': 1 754 1 75', 1 79", 1 79': sales 706 1 76 I 74' 1 78 ' 1 76'. I 74' 01' , 01 ', 01 Prev day's open int 4.406. off 122 SOYBEANS S.0O0 bu minimum: dollars per bushel Mar 7 7 6 7 83 7 7 3'; 7 74': May 7 92 7 99'; 7 88 7 89'; Jul 8 02 8 08' ; 7 99 7 99'; - Aug 7 92 7 97 7 89'; 7 90' .. Sep 7 58 7 63 7 55'; 7 55', - Nov 7 34 7 36 7 3(1 7 30' , Jan 7 45 7 48 7 42 7 42'; Mar 7 57 7.59 7 54 7 55'; -May 7 69 7 69 7 64 7 64'; - Prev sales 61.450 Prev day s open int 112.B04. up "406 SOYBEAN OIL 60.0IMI lbs: dollars per 100 lbs Mar 29 05 29 65 29 97 29 00 29 30 29 25 28 :to 27 25 25 80 25 25 25 25 25 47 29 35 29 58 29 46 28 35 27 30 25 95 25 35 25 25 25 47 Mav Jul Aug Sep Oct Dec Jan Mar 29 40 29 45 28.50 27 35 26 15 25 55 25 50 25 47 sales 17 07 14 32 18 30 30 30 29 90 28 85 27 65 26 15 25 70 25 55 25 47 .927 Prev Prev day's open int 54.095, up l,8i SOYBEAN MEAL 100 Ions: dollars per ton Mar 201 00 202 00 200 20 200 70 May 206 00 207 60 205.20 205 90 Jul 210 50 211 50 209 50 209 80 Aug 210 50 211.50 209 50 210 50 Sep 207 00 208 00 205 50 205 50 Livestock prices 1 50 - 1 80 2 10 -2 10 - 2 50 LOUISVILLE. Ky. IAP) 1USDA1 -Estimated receipts cattle and calves 2300. slaughter steers 50 higher ; slaughter heifers 50 lower, most decline on low-choice and mixed good and choice: cows 1 00 lower: slaughter bulls steady: calves and vealers steady, feeders 1.00 higher: Slaughter steers' high choice and prime 975-1145 lb 70 30-70 90; choice 24 940-1275 lb 68 00-70 00: good and choice 2 3 845-1265 lb 64 50-67 50: few good 965-1150 lb 62 00-64 50. choice 2-3 1293-1500 lb hoistems 61 30-63 70: good and choice mostly 2 8501075 lb 57 60-59 70; Slaughter heifers: choice 2-4 845-1145 lb 64 50-67 50. good and choice 2-3 850-950 lb 63 00-64.50; good 2 3 660-1025 lb 52 0060 00: some standard and good 2-3 715-1025 lb 45 90-53 25. Slaughter cows: utility and commercial 3-5 38 00-47 40; high-cutter and boning utility 1-3 39.00-46.75; low and average cutter 1-2 35 50-39 30; canner and cutter under 800 lb 31 00-35 75; Slaughter bulls yield grade I 2 1180-1520 lb 43 00-52 75; Slaughter calves and vealers: choice and high-choice 155-300 lb vealers 68 00-81 00; standard and good 53 50-64 00. choice 380-485 lb calves 53 00-58 SO, feeders-steers medium frame 300-450 lb 65 00-73 50: 450-500 lb 63 00-70 25. 500-560 lb S3 00-68 00. few 1006 lb partly fattened offerings 64 00: small 1 300-500 lb 60 00-65 00. medium 1-2 600-855 lb 57 00-61 00 small and medium 2 300-500 lb 54506500; 500-700 lb 55 00-63 00: large 2 bolsteins 375-575 I) 4 50-53 25 ; 735-1120 lb 49 00-49 75; heifers medium 300-500 lb 53 00-57.25 500-700 lb 53 00- 55 50; small 1 300-500 lb 50 00-5300. medium 2 300-500 lb 41 00-53 00; 50O-7S0 lb 45 00-53 00, Hogs: CO: bmwi and gilts 75-100 higher; US 1-1 230-345 lb 4 75-46 K US 3 230-345 lb 435-4(75; US 1-3 225-270 lb 45 50-4 35; US 3 350-300 lb 44 25-44 95; lows 1 00-3 OB higher full advance on weights over 500 i; US 11 300-350 lb 3 00-40 00; 350-40 fc 4 OUtOO. 400-450 t 43 00-44 (0: 450-50 to NEW YORK 'AP -Midday slocks: High Low i.asl AMR Corp 32'; 32 32'. AbblLabs 42', 4P. 42'. Allis C'halm 12', 12' 4 12', Alcoa 411", 4(1 40', Am Baker 16'. 16'. 16't AmBrands 55';: 55 55' 4 Amer Can 47:'. 46U 47r-. Am Cyan 4B'; 48 4S'i AmFamil 1? 17 17 Amentech n 67T 67'', ti77. Am Motors 5' i 5', 5', AmStand ;'. 2H'. 28'. Amer T4T n 17' i 17', 17', Beat Food 33 32'. 32'. BellAtlan n 71', 71 71', BellSouth n 94';. 94'. 94'. Beth Steel 20 25;. 2fi Boeing 4(1', 40', 40'. Borden 55 54"4 -54'-. Burlngt Ind 29'. 29'. 29'. CSXCp s 22', 21'.. 22 CaroPwLt 21", 21'3 21S. Celanese 6'4 69'. 69', Cent Sova 15', 15 15', Champ 'int 24 23", 23', Chrysler 28 27'', 27', CocaCola S3'. 53'2 53'.. Colg Palm 23' 4 23', 23', Com Edis 23-, 23', 23': ConAgra 32'. 32', 32'. Contl Group 49', 49", 49', Crown Zell 34'; 34', 34';. DeltaAirl 36 35', 35', DowChem 29 29', 29', duPont 47'2 47', 47', Duke Pow 23', 22', 23' EastnAirl. 6', 6', 6', Easl Kodak 67', 66', 67', EatonCp 464 45-', 46', Esmark s 41 '; 41 41 Exxon 39', 39', 39', Firestone 17 16" , 16', FlaPowLt 36', 36', 36', FlaProgress 19'. 19', 19', FordMot s 38', 38', 38', Fuqua s 26', 26', 26', CTE Corp 37', 37'. 37'-, GnDynam 45', 44' . 45' j UenlElect s 51', 51', 51', Cien Food 48 47', 47'. Gen Mills 47', 47'; 47"-, Gen Motors 58 67 ', 67 ', Gen Tire 32'. 32-. 32;, (JenuParts :18-. 38' : 38-, GaPacif 22', 22', 22"-, Goodrich 31'.. 31'; 31', Goodyear 26', 26s, 26', Grace Co 41', 40 ' 41 Gt.NorNek s 38 '4 38'.- 38', Greyhound 23'; 23'. 23'-.. GulfCorp 65', 64', 65 Herculeslnc 31', 31', 31', Honeywell s 54'; 53', 54'. HosptCp 18', ;I8 38 ITT Corp 40'; 40', 40', lng Rand 49'; 49 49'; IBM 111 110. HO, lntl Harv 9', 9', 9'4 Int Paper 56', 56' 4 56' , IntRectif s i 16', 16', Kmart 31'; 31. 31'; KaisrAlum 18 18 18 KanebSvc 14' 1 14', 14'4 KrogerCo 31 '4 31', 31', Lockhed s 32 '4 32'; 32s, Loews Corp 196' 2 196 196'; Masonite s 29 29-H 29-', McDermlnt 28'2 28', 28'2 McKesson 35 35 35 Mead Corp 35", 35'; 354 MinnMM 76 75"4 75', Mobil 30 29', 29', Monsanto tro 894 89'- NCNBCp 24', 24', 24' NabiscoBrd 41', 41S 411. Nat Distill 27', 26', 27 NorflkSou 56' 4 554 56'. NYNEX n 61", 61S 61", OlmCp 27 26', 27 Owenslll 36 36 36 PacifTel n 56 S5S 56 Penney JC 534 53 53'( PepsiCo 37' 4 37 37', Phelps Dod 27"4 274 27S PhilipMorr 664 664 66', PhlllpsPet 39 38", 38 Polaroid 284 274 284 ProctGamb 46', 46"4 46', Quaker Oat 604 60 604 RCA 30 29S 29', RalstnPur 26S, 26 " 26S, RepubAir 4", 44 44 Republic Stl 224 22", 22", Revkm C 294 294 Reynldlnd 56 55", 55"4 Rockwl s 264 264 26 S, RoyCrown 36"4 36"4 3XJS, StKeglsCp 37S 30S 36", Scott Paper 284 284 284 SealdPwr s 254 254 25", SearsRoeb 34", 34", 34", Sriaklee s 16", i4 16", Skyline Cp 134 134 131. Sony Corp 16", 164 16S Southern Co 15", 154 154 SwstBeU n 59", 59 59, Sperry Cp 40"4 40", 40". StdOUCal 344 34", 344 StdOUInd 544 534 534 StdOUOh 47 46S 46H Sleveai JP 21 ij 21 TRW Ioc 644 644 MS Teuco Inc 364 3(4 S TexEastn 62", (24 . S24 CMC lad 154 144 144 Un Camp 754 744 744 Ub Carbide 554 554 55-4 Umroyil 14 US IIS US Sled 294 JH 94 USWM 54 H4 5 Unocal 33S S3S S3S Express yourself beautifully this Spring with White Stag ' The Clipper polo is a natural for Spring, and it's a classic accompaniment to the coordinating Centennial belted pant shown left. The plaid camp shirt creates a remarkable combination when worn with the Centennial belted culotte, center The Clipper v-neck in coordinating stripes coupled with the belted Centennial pant is well suited for Spring This collection of White Stag' sailcloth in Geranium and Sand is in The Green Room - Second Floor Shop 10-5, Monday-Saturday Use your HUB Charge, Visa, or MasterCard Phone: 236-6131 500-4BC ft 0tv61 40: medium 34.-3t W; boon mr 300 lb 33 0O-34.M: Shnp untaxed

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