Tyrone Daily Herald from Tyrone, Pennsylvania on March 28, 1991 · Page 5
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Tyrone Daily Herald from Tyrone, Pennsylvania · Page 5

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Tyrone, Pennsylvania
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Thursday, March 28, 1991
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Page 5
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Page 10 — THE DAILY HERALD, Tyrone, Pa., Thursday, March 28, 1991 Animal Rights Group Offers $15,000 To End Pigeon Shoot By TERRY MUTCHLER Associated Press Writer HARRISBURG (AP) — A group of animal-rights activists want to trade $15,000 for the lives of about 4,000 birds. Joe Tiikscl, president of the Mobilization for Animals Pennsylvania, Inc. of Pittsburgh, said the group would donate $15,000 to the Hegins Park Weather Fails To Stop TACO Easter Egg Hunt Approximately 150 children and adulis ignored the rain on Saturday morning, March 23, to participate in the Easier Egg Hunt sponsored by the Tyrone Area Community Organization. Almost $400 worth of Easter candy was scallercd in four separate areas of Reservoir Park for children in four age groups to find. Specially marked candy allowed eight lucky children to receive ready-made Easter baskets as additional pri/.es. Winners in the various age groups included: 0-3 years, first prize-Jessica Ncarhoof, second pri/.c-Jamic Kobuck; 4-6 years, first-Ronald Miller, second- Stacic Laird; 7-9 years, first-Jeremy Waitc, second-Michael Boytim; 10-12 years, firsi-Angel Browcr, second- Westlcy Dick. Winners of a drawing were Kay Stringer, cash; James Nogalla, stuffed camel; and Dave Miller, a set of toy cars. TACO representatives said they were pleased with the turnout and thanked all the participants. The group's next planned activity will be a Fish Rodeo for boys and girls to be held Saturday, April 20 at Reservoir Park. Senate Opposes Closing Of The Scotland School The Senate has passed a resolution opposing the closing of the Scotland School Tor Veterans' Children, according to Senator Robert C. Jubclirer (R-30), a cosponsor of Resolution 35. The school was established to provide for the education of orphans and children of honorably discharged soldiers, sailors and marines. As part of his hud pet slashing plan, Governor Casey proposed that the school be closed. The plan has drawn a great deal of criticism from veterans' groups and minorities whose families would be most affected by the closing. Senator Jubclirer said there have been some questions about the admission standards used in recent years at the school. Apart from the importance of keeping the school open, he said that issue must be addressed. Senate Resolution 35 calls on the Secretary of Education to initiate corrective action to conform the admission standards to comply with the current law. In addition, the resolution encourages the Secretary to be more aggressive in getting the word out to veterans and veterans organizations about the educational opportunities at the school. Hershey Gardens 54th Season Opening Soon Hcrshcy Gardens will open April 13 for its 54th season with its most colorful Spring display ever. Nature will put on her best dress for the opening with thousands of brightly colored tulips and other flowering bulbs providing a spectacular show. Through the continued effort of the gardeners new naturalizing mixes have been planted including even more daffodils. In addition, as the weather continues to warm, late April will bring the beauty of twenty-five thousand tulips and more than five thousand spring bulbs such as the grape hyacinth. Following a year of major improvements to the Gardeas, the new season promises to provide both Central Pennsylvania residents and others with the opportunity to savor the beauty of these important botanical gardens with renewed pleasure. A new and decorative cedar fence has been installed along the entrance drive, the stream feeding the pond in the Japanese Garden has been renovated with the removal of the black rubber liner, and the parking lot has been rcpaved and reorganized to provide for a better traffic flow. Throughout the season visitors will be able to look forward to an ever- changing panorama of bloom. Noteworthy collections of magnolias, crab apples, cherries, and dogwoods paint the hill in pastels. Later in the season the rhododendrons, azaleas, and peonies bring their own subtleties in coloration. Annuals planted in May will peak by early July, becoming fuller and remaining in bloom until mid- September or the first frost. Begun as a 3'/i acre plot with direction from Milton S. Hershey "to plant a nice garden of roses," the Gardens have expanded to become a twenty-three acre botanical display. Seasonal flowering displays, collections of specimen trees and shrubs, horliculturally- themed garden areas and several rose gardens provide enjoyment for both the casual visitor and serious gardener. Information on the Gardens may be obtained by calling (717) 534-3492 or by writing "I Love Gardens," P.O. Box 416, Hershey, PA 17033. Administered by The M.S. Hershey Foundation, Hershey Gardens is a not for profit organization located on Hotel Road. Association if it would cancel the world's largest one-day pigeon shoot. "This barbaric event has gone on long enough," Taksel said. He said members of the group donated the money to stop the Fred Coleman Memorial Shoot, which takes place every Labor Day in Hegins, Schuylkill County. Several hundred people pay an average of $75 each to shoot nearly 4,000 pigeons. In the past, event organizers have said they won't stop the shoot because it raises money for parks, fire associations and sports teams. Over the years, they claim, it has raised nearly $300,000. Herman Coleman, one of the event's original organizers, said Wednesday the controversial shoot raised nearly $50,000 in 1989-90. Coleman, 85, said the Hegins Park Trustees and the Labor Day Committee would consider the group's proposal at art April 4 meeting in Hegins. He would not comment on whether he would support banning the shoot, which was named after his uncle, Fred Coleman. Park Association attorney James Dichl could not be reached for comment. A secretary said he was not in. Taksel said his group estimated the event netted $15,000 for the park association annually and is serious about their offer. "This is not a hobby with us. We mean business. There's no place for this medieval spectacle in a modem society," he said in a statement. "It's illegal in most states and should be here." In 1989, a proposal to outlaw live pigeon shoots in Pennsylvania was soundly defeated in the House. Last July, Chicago businessman Steve Hindi offered to fist fight the shoot's organizer in an attempt to stop the shoot. If Hindi won, the shoot would be stopped and the organizer would pay $10,000 to the parks association. If Hindi lost, he would have paid the group $10,000. The association rejected his offer. "My point was these guys had been very boisterous about what manly types they were and that the protesters were hippy-type leftovers," Hindi said Wednesday in a telephone interview. "If blood and guts is the only thing they can relate to, let it be between two consenting adults instead of using birds trapped in a box," he said. During the day-long event, competitors stand about 25 yards away from the birds, which are released from metal cages. The shooter uses cither a single- or double-barreled shotgun. If the birds do not die, children, known as "trapper boys," rush onto the field and pull the birds' heads off with ungloved hands. Last year's shoot drew about 300 protesters and resulted in 24 arrests. Civil War Heritage Days June 28-July 7 The Gettysburg Travel Council has announced plans for the 9th Annual Gettysburg Civil War Heritage Days to be held June 28 through July 7, in conjunction with the 128lh Anniversary of the historic battle fought in Gettysburg. This special event will be co-sponosred by the Gettysburg Travel Council, Gettysburg National Military Park, and the Mason-Dixon Civil War Collectors Association. Philip Magaldi Jr. travel council managing director said, "Each year Civil War Heritage Days continues to grow and this year we arc looking forward to the Company K Memorial Dedication activities on June 28 and 29 which will be one of the highlights of our 9-day special event. For 1991 a Civil War battle reenactment is planned for Sunday, June 30. Other highlights will include the National Park Service Living History Camp on July 6 and 7, band concerts, evening lectures by America's foremost historians, the 17th Annual Gettysburg Civil War Collectors Show, as well as the Annual Firemen's Festival. As in the past, we will be presenting a quality, special event with appeal to all members of the family that will still attract the serious student, historian, or Civil War buff." Information programs outlining all the scheduled events will be available after April 20. For further information contact: Gettysburg Travel Council, Dept. H-81,35 Carlisle St., Gettysburg, Pa. 17325. Bail Doubled For Mother Charged With Infanticide OIL CITY, Pa. (AP) — A judge doubled bail for a Venango County woman who reported her 6-week-old son missing from a supermarket cart and then allegedly confessed she killed him. County Common Pleas Judge H. William White agreed Wednesday with a prosecution request to increase bail to $100,000 for Lisa Lazzell, 22, of Oil City. Mrs. Lazzell was arrested March 20, two days after she told police her baby, Brandon, had disappeared while she shopped at the Bi-Lo Market in Sugarcreek. His body was found in a garbage bin at a shopping plaza two miles away. "We learned of her lack of strong tics to the community, the lack of employment in the family," District Attorney Marie T. Veon told the judge in arguing for higher bail. "We found information that the relationship with her husband may be on the rocks." FBI Agent John S. McCarthy testified at the bail hearing that a letter of five to six pages from Mrs. Lazzell to her husband, Michael, indicating she was going to leave him, was found in the couple's trash during the investigation. He said it was not known whether the letter was written before or after the birth Feb. 3 of 6-week-old Brandon. In granting the bail increase, White cited new information that the Lazzells have criminal records. McCarthy said Mrs. Lazzell was charged twice with shoplifting in Pennsylvania and with burglary and forgery while living in Florida, where she served 18 months' probation. When she first moved to Pennsylvania, her husband was serving 10 months of a five-year prison sentence in Florida for selling marijuana. He also had served time for stolen property, burglaries and receiving stolen property. Lazzell said he is unemployed and that he, his wife and their 3-year-old daughter live on welfare. Her attorney, Neil Rothschild, objected to the raise in bail. He noted that the suspect's parents were trying to raise their daughter's bail. Since the parents are retired and putting another child through college, raising $100,000 would cause hardship, he said. "Why is she more likely to run if the bail is $50, $5,000 or $100,000? It's excessive bail," Rothschild said. "Why Not Have Easter Dinner With Us?" COACHLITE RESTAURANT Old Rt. 220, Tyrone ,684-5410 IfeltegSingaboxofchocolates without anyntysteiy creams. Knowing how package deals usually go, we worked very hard to put together a collection of banking services you want, really. And use often. Like a no-annual-fee VISA® or MasterCard® 1 with Warranty Extension and Automatic Purchase Protection. Free checking, Smart checks, and overdraft protection! Free standard-size safe deposit box. 2 Free banking card and MAC® transactions. 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