The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on September 4, 1930 · Page 3
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September 4, 1930

The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 3

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Blytheville, Arkansas
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Thursday, September 4, 1930
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TMRSDAY, SRPTEMEER 4, 1930' Hl.YTJircVlM.F!, (ARK.) COURIER NEWS PACK TI1RR1 Soldier and Statesman Son o( Queen Victoria^ Statesman and Soldier, ! Now in Failing Health. ! J !, ii) SHI-TON NKA Service Writer ; LONDON.—Tlw British royal family Is concerned about the • liralih of one of its oldest and | mcst celebrated members—the puke : o! Connaug.it, son of a queen, brother of a king, uncle of a king, and father-in-law of a king. Us i:i among Hie last of tli? Victor- | iuiis, u one-time Inspector-General of all the -empire's armed forces, and a Icrnier Governor-General of Canada. ' ' , But Connaught lias passed his ! fcOlh birthday with little ol the I vigor tlmt has sustained him : through an unusually active lite. He not only Is one of-the last cl Hie Victorians; he might be called 'Jhe Victorian par excellence, for, '.'ie Is tile son of the late Queen ! Victoria. He was" barn in. the. thirteenth year of her reign and • :KW .he r on the throne for 50 yeais : more. He saw his brother, Kins '. Edward XII, rule for nine years. And he has watthed his < nephew, ELECT OFFICERS Murray I). McLeod, Warren, flrst [vice-president; Mrs. M. Drcwcry Johnson. Fort Smith; second vice- president; Mrs. J. Walter Kennedy, Be Win. Ireusurer; Mrs. Minnie John-on. Puraguuld., liMorlnn; Mix E. V. MiKsimin, clinplaln; Mrs. per- icy O.iksinlili. StuitKin-t. iiarllami-n- i larlaniMrs. J. C. I'l-rrymun, Hales- . . . ... T _.. I ' V. ^- * > 1 * J I Mil II, tll\lV-> Next Year S Department [ville, srrecanl ul arms, uml Mrs. Jue r> .• Wl'll n U 1 11 Morr'*on, alk-rniue comniitteewo- Conventiou will Be Held j i,, U n. at Monticello ! m ljs ' Ilownni l>loct ° r of my'i" 1 - aiiYionuu.au. ^ mc ttl(s ltvlwn[ imh (lls(| . kil FCKT SMITH. Ark. — Ornn J.! I"™ 1 ' 01 "' Vaughn of Searcy was elected com-; vviu;7t .' , inandcr of the Arkansas depart- ', i MJMIAI, SKNT.KNCKS mcr.l. American Legion, at Ihe clos- | Ol.OVKHSVILLE. N. Y. (Ul'>- ing session of the annual conven- j AfK-r William Cole made Ills 23rd iil-n Wednesday. Monticello wns <. apix-ariiiu-e and William Ue Muni jil'.cs-?!! for the 1931 convention. I' 1 '* ^H'. l» court on Intoxication : Oilier ofiii'crs elected were: Hai-1 charges, they were oidered 10 ' ly Miller, El Dorado, navy vlct- '• ^ rvi ;. lt]fh 59 day sentence:; 0:1 prc.ihlenl; Cecil lialelgh. C'onway, the pas | marine coips vlcf-presldenl; Miss . I* 1 - 1 " '™ . Mary Spsir, nuisei corps ,vltc- ! ' :l : commander; lioland Norrls, Rogers, 1 ;'" *"' Ul The Duke of Connaugh:. 80-jvar-cld soldier and statesman, ai;d one urmy vice-commander; Rev. W. j Sullivan Monllt-cllo, chaplain; Cc,- | cil Wright, Little nock, finance of- \ ! licer; Charles E. Scott Foil Smith,! I ::ireranl-r.t-ai-ms; Will U. O'Shea, I Fort Sinilh. historian. Command- ] | ui Vaughn, Immediately fallowing i j his election, announced the reap- T • : port Ion men t of R. W. .Sisson as]. Ui:oartment adjulanl. ; Dr. II. II. I'ralt, comiminder of j : the Jonesboro post, was chosen del! i'i«tc t- the national convention . i fiom the Hi-it congressional dis- , liict. with Uoy Wilson ol Wilson: j as alternate. | j Mrs. Thomas H. Johnson of Der- • ; molt wns unanimous elected presl- : • denl ol the American Legion aux- I Jones. "installment" plnn. They mils', Jrwn -i j), m. ciifh Saturday in. the following Monthly until the equivalent of llir 1 iias been served. ,,,, , '™ <JO(>1 » J- 11 «>nUKOH. Ha. lUPJ-Thrc- '"°" : ' s llmt , •"*, *'* m "- "• ha: *'' UU '" ; ! ''^P '»' "my 'low hln "',' °"' 1 '"«'''»» clhunond but In ^,,"^" 1 " , UMiu ,! lrt to " ls "<-" fZ' , 1 n"'! , , ' . re< T'""" IT n / ' Tl f' J *, n "\ 1( ' : "" SC * all<1 knlt llnl1 lms ba( ' nm L"' 11 1,''° i° 01 " bLs ' m '" »" >! Head tourler .-lewi Wnnr Adn "ai'ly Collon Prospects Have Boon Sharply Reduced in Recent Weeks. STEKLK. Mir—The finny worn i:as Invaded trie colton fields of IVmt.scol county and assisted t'.i. drouth In reducing the )x)3r pros iccl of :t crop lo !e.w limn one lull! ol a lionmil yield. 'I'he worm making Its appearance uhout ten duys ago hns sws|> over the lleltls In swarms, much a the grusshnjmei' goes through K:in . snipping Held ufler licit! of If l:u;e and damaging t:ie boll un til It Is csliiimlfd Uml Hie dam age from worms alone will rench 'Id- ji nds p:r acre the county over. The drnulli mid worm togoiht has succeeded in lednclnij the ylel horn Ihe nnniml average ofurouiii 1200 pounds to less than l!00|X)und ])ei' acre, Thousantls of pounds of cnlnlu arseniuc has ton used with llltl s'.icces-i. Owing lo the extreme dr wt-ather mid the absence jf de the plant is so dry that the polso blows olf uml Ihe worm gous • o v.ilh his work of destruction. Th orm works fast and goes from eld to Held in Hie space- of it few ours, elving me farmer llttl« niire to (ornbnt him. It Is said that the worm har- and will soon be . and «o Into win r mnuicn.s. 1 ii-!t;i-y oi liie TWO ON ONE HOOK THOUSAND ISLAND PARK, N. Y,, (UP)—James M. Coleman, of Rochester, supposes It will be called a llsh story, but ho says It's a fact lie caught two sunfkh on one hook. One was hooked through the damage I the lip and Hie other in Ihe back ___ " coiinly will I A brother, Edgar, and a son, are orlr-sl crop in ,1:11 ready lo back up Colemnn's Ktale-' •oiniiy. I nynl. It's different There Is no other malted milk exactly like Horlick's. Its quality has, been imitated, but never equaled. Made in a sunlit factory, set clown in a pleasant garden, it is the very essence of rich wholcfiomenessi Safest milk for chiU tlren. Send ten cents for sample and mixer. HORLICK'S KACINE. WISCONSIN »* King George V, reign for twenty. :f thc last of the Victorians, is shown at the left in his most recent | H^S''^l 1 ,"" 1 "."" Miss Sup ed predestined" to iT' For Then | of * Commander-in-Chief. . . ! o:her auxiliary officers are: Mrs. he was christened, his godfather ' " j" was the tirst Dutj ol Wellington, 1 jobs as representative of tiie royal' c-ne of England's greatest captains I family. He went to Sou:li Africa and the man who settled Napo- to open'the Union Parliament and; leon's fate at Waterloo. Having '. he went' to • India to Inaugurate i such a godfather seemed lo have.the Council of Slate and the Im- cclored the boy's thoughts. His; perial Legislative Assembly. Since! giandmother, the Dutches of ,.h e n he has almost withdrawn Teck. wrote of being present atitrcm public life, spending most of -Arthur's dimming lesson." At | his winters in the French Riviera,' C he chose to be painted in Ihe uni- j where I:,; is well known for his form ot the famous 'Grenadier:soldierly bearing and democratic Guards. j ways _ When he got to be old enough \ singularly few anecdotes are to consider seriously what hetiold about- him, but one thing he should do in life, he s:ill wanted j did. in 1900 won him the regard of lo be a soldier. His oldest broth-i the British people. By the death er, Edward, was destined for the of (he tlvn ruler ol the Duchy.ol throne. His next brother, th,? late Saxe-Coburg in Germany, the Duke Duke of Edinburgh, had chosen of Connaujjht fcund himself heir the .navy. So the youngster Just - to the" vacant throne. 'Without naturally turned to the army. A .a moment's hesitation, he declined 16 he entered the Royal Military it. He was born a Britcn, and a Academy al Woolwich. Two years ! Briton he would die. later 1:3 passed out Into the Royal i Engineers. But shortly thereafter ! he transferred as a second lieuten- j ant. into the Royal Artillery and i from that into the Ride Brig'ade. a ; 'celebra";-?d Corps v.:h which he: has maintained close relations j cUwn to this very hour. He was' made a captain in 1871 at the age | of 21. He became a majo r in 18751 • • •• -, , „ , . , . i andiin. 1876'took commission as a I 1 I! ( OPE ' K Alk , <up >- J " mb °. 6'-I '• anv member" of the melon patch., t ^ reclined today in the b=st appoint- 1 - ed window in this city awailing J ) what honorary disposition that' • might be accorded a walermaloi 1 .. The watermelon, the product o-' > A. B. Turner's patch and discrim'.- 160 Pound Hope Melon to Make Trip to Boston became ' lieutenant colonel. He Colonel-in-chlef in 1880. Sa^j Active Service But he did more than step up.! He saw active service and Einelled I gunpowder. In 1870 he was In '• Canada under General Wolseley Pasha's revolt in Egypt took him ,, there in command of the Guards! e brigade. He was m ac Ion at Man- The A = nerican Le gioTi purchased mula and Tel-el-Kebi r and was it , or ^ (rom thc Tcm lc Colton thrice mentioned _ in dispatches. comm T1 , win .,,„„ u ob0iUci Lord Wolseley privately wrote the ( he Arkansas Special to the nation- Qurai that her son had borne L al legion conve niion in Boston ir hlmjelf gallantly under flre. He ! November afterwards received the thanks of j production of Ihe giant mjlon i) Parliament for his services in (he | Ihe result of competitive efforls of I" 16 ' 1 !. nve years by planters here to outdo He undoubtedly owed a lot of i tn e olher. Last year, the late Ed- his rapid'advancement to the facti gar La se ter won honors with his that he was a royal prince. But once having reached a certain high position, his royal blood and con- ncctioas then became a handicap. He had held army commands at Bombay, India, in the southern English district, and at Alder;hot. When -the broke out, 152'1- pound melon. Several year.- 1 ago a drug store started the co:u- pelition in Hempstead county by offering prizes for the largest, melons. "Jumbo" has become thc "Stnr of Hope." It is the subject of many South African war ; news stories and the object of great : :s strongly desired to : civic pride. Men! Here's the Greatest SUIT Value You've Ever Seen -All Wool Fabrics -Hand Tailored --New Patterns --New Models hold an independent command in the field. But his very royalty BLIND PIC HEALTHY ' barred him. i JERSEYVILLE. 111., (UP)—A pig His mat.ier, the Queen, fearing i that can neither hear nor see. is for his safety, vetoed his apira- ' owned by Stephen Woolsey. a far- tions and he had to be content j mer residing near here. Despite with being Commander-in-Chief j Ihe handicap; the animal is grow- of the forcer in Ireland. U was '"S fat- The pig lias eye sockels generally thought he was destin-' but no eyes, and the cars, which cA to succeed his great-uncle, the ' are normal in appearance, have no Duke of Cambridge, as Command- : openings leading to organs of hear- cr-ln-chief of the British army . '"S^ Woolsey believes the ani- Thc gr^at statesman. Disraeli, in;'"»' locales food by its sense fact, advised the Queen to retain i of tmell alone. When corn is the supreme army command in the ' thrown to the litter, the blind pig royal family. But Ihe limes were 11 huslles around and secures its becoming more democratic and It share. j |ij was deemed wiser policy to name Lord Wolseley as more represen- lalive of -the British people. Connaughl was given consolation in the shape oT a Field Mar- shalship in 1902. When th? posl of Commander-in-chief uas abolished and an Army Council established in its place, the Duke was made Inspecto r General of all the armed forces. As such he traveled tritely, seeing the troops in ! Two tablespoonfuls of that amoz- Egypt, South Africa, Hong Kong j jngiy refreshing and fool in vigor, and Malaysia. Then he was made | ating Radox to one gallon of wat- j Commander-in-chief of the Medl-; er makes a footbath which after' terranean forces. After that he 3 or 4 nights' soaking lifts out left the army, convinced there was |aching, maddening corns, callouses.' no further career Ihere for him. I loo—root" and all. ', Dut scon a new call was made 1 Radox s.-ftens the hard outer' upon him. In 1911, he was ap- layers of corn—and oxygen which pointed Governor-General of Can- p a dox liberates, enters the 'pores. : ada and was one of tte most pop- each n\g:A penetrating'further and <i!ar that great Dominion ever further, carrying the salts right to had. This public esteem he shar- rC ot of corn which can be lifted ed with his daughter, Princess Pa-! out bodily. tricla—known all over Canada as j Wcnderful to take oul pain and "Princess Pat." and after whom burning and refresh lired feet! was named a famous Canadian! del a package of Radox at Kirby regiment which won glory for it- : Druj Co. or any drugstore and self on many a field in France and know the Joyous comfort of corn Flanders. Owing to the outbreak a nd callous free fceU-Uadox is of the war, the Duke served as the mcdern. scientific method to Governor General for an unusually remove corns which completely eli- kng period, only relinquishing the minatcs old fashioned plasters, task in 1916. •dan^rous cutting, skin destroying He also performed Iwo olher acids and obsolete methods,—Adv. Yes sir, they're hand tailored throuRhout of all wool fabrics in a wide range itf new p.'itlcrns in blues, greys, browns and mixtures. We w;mt you to see these superior suit values made possible by the new low prices. Joyous Foot Bath i Then Lift Out j CORNS! Root and AH—Out To Stay! ; NEWHATS S5 buys a mighty good Hat this Fall — new shapes and colors are here awaiting your approval. NEW SHOES Reaulifully styled, all 'eather shoes — Wing Tips, i'lain Toes and conservative models — every pair a real value al 5 $ 5 R. D. HUGtiES & CO. Complete OutflUers for Men and Hoys EASY TO LOOK AT—good to look at—that's your reaction to charm and beauty. Easy to smoke—good to smoke—that's the lure of Camels. Good because of thc natural mildness and fragrance of mellow tohaccos, with all the delicacy and aroma preserved by scientific skill in preparation and blending—good because there's no over-processing or doctoring—no flatness of taste. Easy—because they are so mild and smooth that you can smoke them all the day through with never a suggestion of throat discomfort. Notice that it's Camels now — your crowd and elsewhere — because Camels are so good to smoke. CAMELS

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