St. Louis Post-Dispatch from St. Louis, Missouri on October 30, 1886 · Page 10
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St. Louis Post-Dispatch from St. Louis, Missouri · Page 10

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Saturday, October 30, 1886
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TIIEY NEVER LIE. yiQUKES IN THE CASK OF THE LEAGUE VS. THE ASSOCIATION. " Th National Body Oat-Played, at Almost All Points by the American Aaalysis of Thirty Games Between Representative Clubs in Both Local Billiard News Football Sporting: Notes. Not a little discussion has been caused by the question ' ' Which is the better as a base ball organization, the American Association or the National League?" The question is one which will produce no end of wrangling, which leads on all sides to no very pleasant result and al ways ends unsatisfactorily lor the parties concerned. League men point proudly to the precedence of their organization ; to the fact that it holds a majority of the men whose names have been for years Identified with the diamond; to the great contests it has had and all that sort of tiling, at the same time smiling on the League's younger brother with an expression of toleration, but no more. The main drift of opinion in the direction of the League's alleged superiority cau be traced to the fact that in many cities the people wno so belittle the Association have never seen its clubs play bail between themselves, let alone with renresentative cluDS or tne national body and.besaing the question from the start. Dutit down in their notebooks as a foregone conclusion that clubs in the Association have no more business with their own than a dray horse has with a thoroughbred. Ihis seems to be the case, particularly with Chicago, where the absurd question, "What is the Association?" has often been asked! Apart from the fact that Chicago was answered fully and completely on the White Stocking ball ground in that city and at Sportsman's Park in this, other cities, in the Union have been answered as well, and it is to particularize this fact that the Post-Dispatch presents its readers with the figures given below. Taking thirty games played this fall between the clubs of the two organizations, it has been found that at every point almost the Association has shown itself vastly superior to the older aggregation. It must be remembered, too, that these results were worked out when the men on the playing clubs were all In good condition, fresh from the long season's practices; that the clubs had their best teams in the field , and that the final results were all that were looked to. The first remarkable defeat suffered by the League was in a eame which Chicago played With Pittsburg before the season had come to a close. In that game the League champions were badly defeated by the Smoky City lads. To the 3 runs made by Chicago, Pittsburg scored 10; of earned runs, 3 went down for Pittsburg and a goose egg for Chicago. The score and summary of the game showed this result: Base hits, Pittsburg, 14; Chicago, 6; errors, Pittsburg, 4; Chicago, 7; three-base hits, Pittsburg, 3; Chicago, 0; struck out, Pittsburg, 1; Chicago. 6; first base on balls, Pittsburg, 4; Chicago, 2. Each club made one double play. Thus it will be seen that "Hustling Horace and his aggregation" outplayed the Chicago people at every point. In- two games which the Pittsburgers played with the next best club in the League, the Detroits, Phillips' team shut out the League men In one and tied them in the other. In the two games Pittsburg men crossed the plate 10 . times to Detroit's 4; made 11 hit to the 9 of Detroit; made 4 errors to Detroit's 9; earned 8 runs while Detroit earned 2. Detroit's pitchers sent six Pittsburgers to bases on balls and Pittsburg's but 1; seven balls were ?assed"toy Detroit's catcbers- ami none by itt-?bure's. Other work was: Two base nits, Pittsburg, 2; Detroits, 0; 3 base hits. Detroit. 2j:'Ut3burK, 0. For Detroit 14 men struck out " 0lfor Pittsburg, 12. Detroit -made double are'rr' games played by Louisville and Kan-t"T the lilue-grass crowd scored 18 times j fln,vT3f the cowboys winnin- both games, neoned out 2a 8inle8 to their 21; made 3 ine igaers and 1 two bagger to the 1 each of -, -pponents and scored 9 errors to their Jh!J'f earned runs Louisville batted out 7 and j,;"a8 City 0. The cowbovs' pitchers, how-v, struck out 13 of the Heckerites and 10 7 boys fanned out. Passed balls, Louis-.lle. 3; Kansas City. 2; of baseson balls Louis-.ille took 7 and the cowboys 5; Louisville made 2 wild pitches and Kansas City 1 and the only double play had to be given to Louisville. f Baltimore and Washington, the tail-endrs respectively oi the Association and the Leaarue. make a fine comparison in five trames they played together. Although Bamie's club won three out of the fiv games the Nationals had more runs to their credit, for the reason that in one of the games the score was 191 in their favor. Had the runs been made In proportion they would have been greatly smaller in number for the League club. However, to the 19 runs brought in by Baltimore In the five games, Washington had 29 to its credit. In errors Washington had 16 while Baltimore had 21. Of hits 27 were chalked down for the Church City, while the Capital had 2 more to their credit. Two-base hits Washington, 6; Baltimore. 4; three-base hits, 2 each ; struck out, each 26; passed balls By Baltimore catchers, 6; by Washington catchers, 9. Of the Baltimores 17 men took first on six balls, and of Washington 9. Of earned runs Washington piled up 8 and Baltimore 4. Baltimore stole 8 bases and Washington 3, and the only double play was made by Baltimore. Although th e totals will not show it, Baltimore out-piayea the Wastt-ingtons in all the games but the last, which negatived all their good work in tha other four. One game was played between the Association tail-enders and the Detroits, and the latter were easily defeated, the Baltimores clearly outplaying the Wolverines at all points and stages of the game. The score-book showed that the Association club made 9 runs to the 4 of the Detroits, one of the former's being earned. The errors were 4 to 6 in Baltimore's favor. This club made 2 three-base hits, and 1 double was made by both. Baltimore batters hit safely 11 times, w hile Detroit got there but 6. Strike outs-Baltimore, 7; Detroit, 7. Passed balls Detroit. 1. Wild Ditches Detroit, 1. Stolen bases Baltimore, 7: Detroit, 1. Double plays Detroit, 2. In two games played between the Phlladel-phlas and the Athletics, the League club won one and the other was a tie. In both Philadelphia scored 11 runs and the Athletics but 6. as they were shut out. 60, in the first game. The 1 hillies earned 3 out of the 11 runs, and the Athletics. 0; of single base hits, Philadelphia had la and the Athletics 9; only 8 errors were n il . V. , - Kin...... w ' : . . .... ' "u me laiter s twirlers made but 4 of tne opposition fan themselves to death; passed balls. 2 by Athletics, l bv Phillies: first on balls, Phillies 2. Athletics 1 No wild pitches were made by Philadelphia' and 4 by the Athletic side. Wright's base runners stole 4 bags, while only one Athletic man attempted it successfully. On double plays the Athletics beat their opponents, the score on this head being 2 to 1. .Three games were played by the New Tork ulants and tha Metropolitans and Mutrie's men captured all ol them. Tne Giants made jut three times as many runs as did the "trophy" end of the string, the total being 12 to 4. The New Yorks batted out 18 singles to 17 of the Mets and made 7 errors, 2 less than the oppo- eition. The Mets got even by making 4 two bases to the three of New York and one thrte bagger to a zero in the same line on the New York side of the house. In strike-outs the two clubs were a tie, 7 men on each dying at the hauds of their pitchers. No balls escaped the Mets' catchers while 2 got by the New Yorkers'. For each side 5 men took first base on bad balls. Of the New Yorks' 12 runs, 3 were earned and of the Mets' total, 4. 2 wers earned. New York had one stolen base and 3 double plays to its credit and the Mets no stolen bases and one double play. The Giants, how rer, met with another reception when they went across the bridge and tackled an association clnb.which while it didn't amount to much in the Association kept bet' ter company than tail-end people like the Met- . roplitans. Out of the three contests which Mutrie's self-styled pennant winners had with, tho Brooklyn team the latter club won 2. Byrnes' men scored 17 runs to the 15 of the Leaguers, though they earned only 3, which (was 1 lens than their neighbors. Of the Brook-lynttes ii went to first on safe hits, while 19 only of the New Yorks did the same thing. Brooklyn made 15 errors altogether, 1 less than . tha New l'orks, who had 16. I wo-Oase hits. A ; ,uuuu nuuuiB ciun ana 9 by Lew Simmons . Two-base hits. Phillies, 4; Athletics, 0; three-base hits. Philiies, 2- Athletics. 1. The Phillies' nitnliora t..i- .. i, I . Av.wl.n o - Itmnl Ivn 1 The V l I rv , f , - . - jCew Yorks had 8 of their men struck out, while only 6 of Brooklyn did the same tiling. The catchers on both sides let 3 bails go by. and the pitchers sent 8 New Tforkers and 11 Brooklyn men to bases on balls' Wild pitches were 3 and 4 in New York's favor. Four double plays were made by the Giants. Coming nearer home the statistics will grow more interesting." Five frames have bee ! played by the Browns and Maroons of this city, ana cue ngures reuounu w iuc thetiow champions of the world, all around. All five games have been won by the Brown Stockings teaia. and the total number of runs made bv them is 30; the total number made by the Maroons is 10. Of these the Browns earned S and the Maroons but 1. Of single base uita the Browns made 33 and the Maroons 26; of two-base hits the Browns knocked 8 and the Maroons 4. The Maroons have 28 errors on their side of the book and the Browns 19. The Association champions' pitchers struck out 31 men of the Maroons - and -the League Club pitchers 28 ot the Browns' batsmen. The Maroons' catchers permitted 6 bails to pass them by, and the Browns but half of that number. The Maroons' pitcher sent 9 men to first base by bad delivery and the Browns but 4. The Maroons' pitchers went wild 4 times and the Browns' but once. The Maroons' runners , stole 7 bases and the Browns' runners saw them and went one better. Lach club made 1 double play. Tne last series of ihter-games between clubs of the National League and the American Association is fresh yet in every mind. It was the culminating point of a two-years' agitation and was the one decisive ser.es of the National game. Six games were played by the St Louis Browns and the Chicago White Stockings, the champions of their respective organizations, and in the figures in these as in the vast majority of the games analyzed above, the superiority of the American Association is. to the League loins, painiuiiv ipimicu". Of the six games the Browns won 4 and the Chicagos, 2. The total number of runs made by the Browns was 38 while that made by the Chicago was 28. The Browns' batterv hammered out 49 single hits, 6 two base hits", 8 three base hits and 2" home runs while Chicago was satisfied with 39 singles, 5 doubles, 5 triples and3 home runs. The Browns made but 3D errors to the 41 of Chicago; their catchers had but 4 passed balls to Chicago's 8 and their pitchers sent 18 of the Chicagos to bases while the Chicagos' pitchers sent 17, only 1 less. The Chicago twiilera made 9 wild pitches and the Browns' but 2. The Browns stole 6 bases but the Chicagos could do it only 3 times. On double play, however, the White frtockings had the advantage making 4 to the Browns' 1. The Browns struck out 36 times and the Chicagos 20. In figuring out the totals on the above plan it will be found that in the thirty games described above the advantage will in almost every particular be on the side of the Assoc. a-tion: Kuus Association, 161; League, 125. Single base-hits Association, 222; League. 1S7. Errors Association, 124; League, 150. Earned runs Association, 38; League, 35. Two-base hits Association, 30; League, 23. Three-base hits Association, 20: League, 12. Home runs Association, 2; League, 3. Struck out By Association pitchers, 133; by League pitchers, 147. Bases on balls By Association pitchers to League batters. 59; by League pitchers to Association batters, 72. Passed balls By Association catchers. 27; by League catchers, 39. Stolen bases By Association runners, 30; by League runners, 19. Wild pitches By Association, 25; by League, 23. Double plays Association, 8; League,17. Out of 30 gamra played 19 were won by the Association clubs, 9 by the League clubs and 2 were tied. The following table shows how the victories and defeats were distributed: LEAGUE VS. ASSOCIATIONS i 5 s i! I 5 e c"i Samis or Clubs. i j : ?j ; Plttsourg-Detroit 2 1 0 1 Pittsburff-i hicago 110 O Louisvilie-Kansas City 2 2 0 Baltimore-Washington 5 3 2. 0 Baltimore-Detroit 110 0 Brooklyn-New York 3 2 1 0 Metropolitans-New York 3 0 3 0 Athletics-Philadelphia 2 0 1 1 Browns-Maroons 5 5 0 O Browus-Chicagod 6 4 2 0 Totals 30 19 9 2 THE 4S5UCIATIOS HEAVIER. - ' - - . - - . PLATS. Assn. Xeague. l"l! 125 222! 17 124 1 150 3i : 3? HOI 23 20 12 2! 3 1471 133 '72i 59 27i 39 30! 3 9 25j 23 S! 17 Runs Base nits. Errors Earned runs Two-base hits Three-base hits Home runs Struck out Bases on balls Passed balls .. Stolen bases Wild pitches Double plays In conclusion, the remarks of a well-known base-ball writer, iu comparing the base runners, pitchers and catchers of the two organizations, will come in appropriately: l win pit Latnam, icoi,coinisaey, Caruth- ers, ;ieason. V eleh, Brown. Miller, Carroll, Barkley, Stovey, liobixson. McGarr, Collins, Mack, McPhee. Corkhill. Fennelly. Fulmer. nekney, McTamany and Smith, against any similar number of League men. and feel satisfied the League would be beaten in this respect. It is claimed by the League people and their or gans that their pitchers are much superior to those of the A:?souiation, which accounted for the heavy battinsr in the latter. Assuming this to be true, how cart the Association fielders hold up ;their end so wen, as wnen tne pitching is lnenective and the batting heavy, the ball is hit much harder at the fielders than if it was effective, thus making fielding so much more difficult? But if the pitchers in the Association are inferior to those of the League, why is it that the League batters are unable to bat their delivery in the exhibition games? But this talk about the League haviag better pitchers is all nonsense. I will append a list below, niacin? the nitnher of both associations according to their rank opposite each other, and then let you take your choice : AMERICAN ASSOCIATION. NATIONAL LlAOrX Caruthers, St. LouU. Ferguson, Philadelphia. liamsev. Louisvite. Iiaiuwin. ueiroit It asev, Philadelphia, Shaw, Washington. McCormlck. Chicago. iClarksou, Cbicaeo. !elch. New York. IKadbourn, Bostou. j Whltuer. Kansas City. Ilveefe, New York. !temmyer, Boston. jWeidnian. Kansas City. Conway, Detroit. IBovle. St. Louis. IHealey, St. Louis. Kilrov. Baltimore. Morris. Pitt-htire. Meeker. Louisville. Koutz. St. Louis, liuoson. St. Louis, (ialviii, Pittbur. Cu.-hinan. Metropolitan Miller, Athletic-. Atkison. Atliletlr. Lynch. Metropolitan nan, Alllietic. Mais, Metropolitan. Porter, Brooklyn. Henderson. Itrooklyn. Matthews. Athletic. t,etzein. Uetroit. Buflinton, Boston. Kirby. St. Louis. .McKeou, Kansas City. Kailey, I hiladelphia. Maiiipan, Washington, Crane, Washington. Flynn, Chicago. Smith. Cincinnati. rerrv. Brooklyn. Handiboe, l-ttt-bnrg. Mcljinnis. Baltimore. Mullane. Cincinnati. Sliafer. Meirouolitan. Pechiney, Cincinnati. iiniu. uetroit. "This about completes the list of the pitchers of both associations, and I venture to say that a majority of people in Philadelphia, New lork and St. Louis, where they have a chance of seeing the clubs of both associations, will choose three-fourths of the American pitchers over those of the League, as f have them mated. When it conies to catchers the Association is equally well fixed. There are Bushong, Milligan, O'Brien. Carroll. .Miller. Peoples, Robinson, Iieipschlager, Baldwin, Cross, Kerins, Cook and Fulmer, who compare very lavorably with Bennett, Ewing McGuire, Clements, Gilligan, Deasley, Daily, Dealey. Flint, Kelly, Myers and the rest of them." Rase Ball Briefs. The Browns won both games they played at Little Hock with the local team there. A game is announced for to-morrow at Sportsman's Park between "Anson's Windbags" and "Comiskey's Growlers" for the benefit of the Chicago bankrupt sports. Owing to a delay at little Rock the Brown Mocking team could not arrive in the citv in time to play at Sportsman's Park this afternoon, ltid last game between the Browns and the Maroons will, therefore, be played at the luion Park to-morrow. j rinh t;J;eTQ of tlle. Cinclnnati Base Ball t.HePSdHy ,slK'lea 1K Crothers, the pitcher, for next season. Crothers and nia catcher. Buckley, have an agreement to work on the same team, and Mr. Mem will sign the other end of the battery later on. K ..J' 18 Riven out on the quiet that Kelly and W ill.amson w,U play on St. Louis elubs next year. That Is one of them will play on the Browns and one on the Maroons. How thev are to be distributed is not stated in tne rumor. As Mr. Spalding says that Kelly will play in Chicago, if he Dlavs at all, that part of the statement is worth but little. l oot Ball. The season for foot ball has opened up and some of the local kickers have already begun to practice. The Thistle Club have, survived tha not weather and will haye a oyupla of practice elevens in the field at Sportsman 8 Park to-morrow. The secretary ol the inis-tles, in speaking of the report that a Cnicago club is anxious to meet the team, said that whenever the Chicago people desired to talk business the Thistles would be ready for them. , , . The reorganization of the St. Louis toot-Ball Association which existed last year will be considered at an early date. It is proposed to form two new clubs to fill any vacancy wbicn may arise on account of the failure of any of the clubs which existed last year to apply for admission to the Association. A good season Is anticipated by the foot-ball players. BiUiards. Charley Schaefer has been added to the list of entries In the cushion carrom billiard tournament which will begin Monday evening at Scbaefer's. The first game will be played between Frank Maggioll aud Louis Keid. The game will be for 200 points. Tne following are the scores up to date of the games played in the three-cushion tournament at Baldwin's: Koody, 50; i Harris, 46; Adams, 50; Somers, 45; Jonah, 50; Kneff, 43; Adams. 50; HI o M.nf in- Shormun ftf) MaSCOt. 30 1 PetCrS, ci."n..UF V. uUf.i Kn- viiiis4inn. 46: Sher man. 50; 'Kn'eif, 28;' Kneff, 50; Adams, 47; Souiers, 60; bchaner. 22; uaruy, iw, ivuwvj , 45; Hill. 50; Roody. 42. ,. Harry Baldwin played a 14-incn balk line game, with a well-known Clayton lawyer yesterday at the Laclede parlor. Three hundred points were up and Harry defeated the limb of the law two strings. Gymnasium Notes. "Old Sport" Howard is in the city and will visit the Gymnasium Sunday at 2 p.m. Chas. Ileickroth, formerly of the Missouri Gymnasium, but lately connected with the "Three American Athletes," has gone to Hastings, Neb., to take charge of a gymnasium. Hand ball is having quite a boom and a good game may be seen eyery aay at noon between such crack players as John Dunn, Joe Tumulty, P. Carr, Broderick, Araao, A. M. Cobb, Dennis Colinan, Dr. Smith, Dr. Mulhall and the "Professor." The fall exhibition which takes place in December promises to be the best given by the gymnasium in the last two years. A great Interest is taken in it by the boys and teams of acrobats, bar performers, leapers aud tumblers are practicing daily for the event. Thursday night, November 18, will be a reception night. Besides the regular class exercises a short programme has been arranged, consisting ot sparring, club swinging aud a number 01 athletic sports. Invitation tickets will be given to members for their friends and no person will be admitted without a ticket. The Memphis Sleeting. The first race at Memphis yesterday was a selling purse for all ages, one mile and a sixteenth. It was won by Petticoat with Watch 'Em, second and Fronie Louise third. Time, 1:5414. The second race was called off for want of starters. Third race, free handicap for ail ages, run in mile heats. Dausinan won both heats. The fourth race was tor the Gayoso Hotel sweepstakes, ail ages, mile aud one-quarter, and was won by sir Joseph, with Hopedale second. Time, 2 :15'. Sport ins Notes. Jimmy Mitchell and Walter Campbell, his friena and second, now in the city, indulged in a six-round glove iiht last night at a local resort. Neither man was knocked out. Charley Daly received a letter to-dav from L. Cheney saying he would go toStreator, 111., and arrange a match to a finish with Myers for 6500 a side. The articles to be drawn up Tuesday. Jack McAuliff and Billy Frazier fought last night at Boston for $1,0J0 and the light-weight champiouship. McAuliffe won in the twenty-first round by hitting Erazier a settler on the neck. Corr'.gan's horses will winter at Mobile. He will personally supervise the care of his extensive stable. Mr. Corrigan has not yet given up hopes of bringiug I'reeiand out in ltes7. Since the race between Oliver K. and Harry Wilkes, Charley Schwartz has been flooded with challenges for a brush with Oliver K. ;-chwartz offers to bet $1,000' to 55.000 that Oliver K. can beat Majolica on any good track in the country outside of Fleetwood Park. Among the race-horses dead this year are Charley Kempland. Carrie Stewart, Elmen-dori, Enright, Earrell, Forrest. Harriuan, Heretogist, Hobson's Choice. Joe S., Miss Brewster, Nitot, Prodigal, Quebec. Rapids, aracon, Tony Barton, Thistie, St. Patrick, Tiitord, Trombone, Waddell, Bryant, Glenul-len, and, of course, the great Dew Drop. Baby to heaven soon may go, Strauss keeps its bright face here below. LIFE AT THE CLCBS. Preparations for the Social Season Banquets and Receptions in the West End. The clubs have scarcely settled down to-winter life as yet. During the season of fall festivities the members stirred themselves to entertain their visiting friends, but with the closing of the Exposition came somewhat of a lull in club circles which will probably continue until after Thanksgiving. The committees of entertainment for th winter have been appointed at all the leading clubs, however, aud the Geriuania and Liederkraaz programmes have already been announced through the columns of the Post-Dispatch. The indications are favorable for a brilliant social season on every side. SOCIAL GATHERINGS. The University Club will lead off the season at the new house in the Wast Bud with a reception on Tuesday evening. November 9. There will be music, light refreshments and dancing. The new quarters are admirably adapted for social gatherings and there will be a large and fashionable attendance. 'lhis evening a complimentary banquet will be given to Gen. Wni. T. Sherman at the fct. Louis Club by the Commercial Club. It will be an elegant affair in every respect, and every member of the distinguished club will be in attendance to do honor to the general. Although as yet onlx three dates have been positively fixed by the Germania Club for their winter programme, including he Christmas entertainment and the uiaiqu " -'j, several other entertainments win ' 'ed during the season, ol which due . ill be given in these columns. President Mosss Fraley of thecarmonie Club has made a special appeal tolhe members to attena the first entertainment of the season, which is announced to take place this evening, at the club-kause on Olive and Eighteenth streets. An excellent programme has been arranged, the company assembling at 9 o'clock, A hop will follow. Several banquets have been given during the week at the Mercantile Club, the arrangements throughout reflecting great credit upon the management of that house. A superb menu was furnished for the complimentary gathering in honor of Mr. Joseph Spec-ht and the Loyal Legion banquet to Gen. Sherman was a success in every leature. Receiver'. Sals ol Engravings, Etc. Great bargains In engravings, etchings, etc., at liedheffer & Koch's, 1000 Olive street. SrSPKNDKD IN M1I-AIB Remarkable Accident to m Driver and His Kijr at Catskill, N. Y. By Telegraph to the Post-Dispatch. Catskill, X. T. , October 30. A remarkable accident, particularly in regard to its results, occurred here yesterday. Arthur Story was delivering a barrel of flour at a house near the east end of the bridge of the West Shore Koad, which spans Catskill Creek. The house is built near the brink of the rock, which has a precipitous deseent of more than one hundred feet. The horse took fright and backed suddenly, to the indescribable horror of those who witnessed the accidsnt disappearing with its driver over the cliff' After falling about half the distance the wagoa was caught by the limbs of a tree, the horse hanging head downward, suspended in the air. Tne driver, who had held on to the wagon, now descended the tree, and the horse by its struggles broke the harness, and rolling over several times, brought up against a stump of another tree on a narrow ledge of ri. U was brought down with considerable aifltcuity when lurther assistance was obtained. Beyond some rather severe cuts and Druises no injury was suffered by either man or beast. or Bronchial. Asthmatic, and Pulmonary Complaints, "Brovn't Bronchial Trochea" manifest remarkable curative properties. ioli only in bote. . SOCIETY GOSSIP- Miss Lottie Willis is visiting friends at Ful- ! ton. Mo. Miss Mamie Kozler is visiting friends la tho - country. ! Mrs. Edgar Tilton has gone to Chicago for a short visit. I i Mrs. James Dun of the Iron works spent last week in the city. Miss Christine Eno is entertaining her friend. Miss Lizzie Irwin. i Miss Adele Norcom left this weak to visit friends in Chicago. i Mrs. Cozard of Dayton, O., is visiting her later, Mrs. Jacobs. , Mrs. Nelson Birch is visiting her relatives at Independence, Mo. Mrs. Smith of Milwaukee, nee Garrison, is Visiting her parents. . ,1 Mrs. A. C. Davis left last week to visit her uncle at Bunker Hill. Miss Florence Fortune was expected home this week from St. Paul. Mrs. May B. Pearman and son ate not goinar to Europe as announced. Mrs. Geo. 8. Robinson is entertaining her sister, Mrs. L. D. Grover. Mrs. George D. Reynolds of Jefferson City is visiting St. Louis friends. Miss Nettie Moore is visiting her sister, Mrs. I. J. Smith, at Pierce City. Mrs. L. M. Wade left this morning to join her husband at Little Iiock. Mr. James E. Carstophan is entertaining his daughter, Mrs. R. B. Speed. Mrs. A. B. Garrison has returned from a visit to her sister, Mrs. Hale. Mrs. W. A. Todd and family of St. Clair will spend the winter in the city. Mrs. Frank Hamlin is visiting her sister, Mrs. Clark, at Edwardsville, Mo. Miss Lizzie Stutt has returned home after a delightful visit to Miss Kose Uhri. Miss Lee Meng, who has been visiting friends in Sedalia, has returned to Dover. Mrs. J. W. Dawson left last week to visit her sister-in-law. Mrs. W. C- Dawson. Miss Belie Rowland is visiting her friend, Mrs. Charlie Landers of St. Joseph. Mrs. Hugh Nicol left Inst week to visit her mother, Mrs. Stroch of Kansas City. Mr. and Mrs. Richard Shaoleigh are with their parents on Washington avenue. Mr. and Mrs. N. M. Garland have moved from Chestnut street to 3;!25 Pine street. Mrs. C. C. Hardcastle has returned from a visit to her sister. Mrs. G. M. Patterson. Mrs. W. B. Wertcottof 2034 Chestnut street has returned from a visit to her parents. Mrs. E. B. Oyerstreet is entertaining her friend, Mrs. Duncan of Montgomery City. Mrs. Messier of Dayton. O.. Is the guest of her sister, Mrs. Jacobs of Chestnut street. Mrs. Charlotte Hoffman of Edwardsville is in the city, residing at30i7 Easton avenue. Miss Nellie Thompson has returned from a visit to Mrs. A. P. Williams of Springfield. Miss Mav Dwight-Foote left thi week for Boston, after a charming visit to St. Louis. Mrs. Virginia Castleman left last week for a little visit to her children at Louisville. Ky. Miss Julia Brookwalter who has been visiting Miss Moilie Tansey, has returned home. Mr9. Gen. Boyle is entertaining Mrs. Dr. Isaac Scott of New Orleans, nee Dora Deane. Miss Heyl of Texas is the guest of Misses Turner at their country home, "The shelter. " Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Darst are expected this week from their bridal tour of the West. The Misses Sterling have arrived from Europe and are visiting their aunt in New York. Mrs. John Overall is entertaining Mrs. T. A. Hockaday and Mrs. James Rollins of Columbia. The first ball of the Germania Club will be given Saturday evening, the 13th of .November. Prof. Tiedman, who with his mother and Bister spent last week in the dity, has returned home. Mr. J. Q. A. Fritchie will leave soon to Join his wife in Denver, where they will remain all winter. ' Prof. A. G. Robyn is very proud of a little nephew aged 2 weeks, named Alfred G. Robyn Kilgen. Mr. and Mrs. John Kauffman are expected home from Europe soon after the 1st of November. Dr. L. N. nornsby of South St. Louis, with his daughter, is visiting his brother. Dr. R. J. Hornsby. Sliss Minnie Rumbold is visiting Miss Brella Sherwood, daughter of Judge Sherwood, at Springfield. Mr. Geo. W. Powell will arrive in New York on Monday after an extended tour abroad of six months. Mr. end Mrs. Henry Farley have taken the house. No. 2S24 Pine street, where they will keep house. Miss Lula Scott gave a dinner party to twelve young ladies and gentlemen on Monday evening. Mr. and Mrs. W. II Thornburg of Washing ton avenue are very proud of their baby boy, aged 1 month. Miss Mason Rogers, who has been visiting her aunt, Mrs. Sallie Haley, at Wrebster, has returned home. Mrs. James Waugh. who has been spending the Carnival season with St. Louis friends, has returned home. Lieut, and Mrs. Mitchell of Frankfort. Kv.. are visisting their sister, Mrs. Chariess Cab-anne, this week. Mrs. Harry Kirk, who has been visiting her mother. Mrs. S. Grooms, has returned to her home, in Illinois. Mrs. J. W. Allen is expected home soon from the East where she attended the mar riage of her niece. Miss Clara Jennings and Miss Drew nf Moberly. Mo., have gone home after a visit to Mrs. Edgar Tilton. Mrs. McClure is with her daughter Mm Clark at the Southern Hotel, where they are spending the winter. Mrs. McNair and daughter will leave this afternoon for Pass Christian, accompanied by her son Mr. John McNair. Ex-Goy. and Mrs. Stanard and family have gone to Chieago.aceompanying Miss Ella Stanard, who has been very ill. Misses Llllie and Katie Roberts, who are at school at Baird College, spent Sunday in the city visiting their relatives. Miss Florence Bowman has gone with hr mother, Mrs. M. V. Bowman, to visit her grandmother at Carondelet. Miss Irene McNeal of Tennessee is Tioit.in. her relatives, and has been delightfullv en tertained during her visit here. Mrs. Frank Kauffman has gone back to Kan. sas City to visit her parents, and will spend the greater part of the season there. Miss Jones of Tennessee has been riviio-ht- fully entertain t d during her visit to MrsTM J. Byrnds of Washington avenue. Miss Wilhelmine Meyer, who has spending several weeks delightfully with St Louis friends, has returned home. Mrs. Dr. Glasgow is entertaining hor .wr. Bisters, the Misses Englesing from Mississippi, Miss Emma Funsten of Baltimore is vlsit'ng her sister, Mrs. Reed, having come on to attend the Funstou-i orbes wedding. Mr. A. II. Handlan is very happy over a babv girl who arrived on Thursday. He says she weighs twelve pounds and is a daisy. Mrs. Kerens of Morgan street gave a dinner party to twelve on Tuesday evening. The menu was served in courses by Beers. Miss Eva Paddock gave a handsome german on Monday evening to Miss Mary Dwiut-Foote, prior to her departure for Boston. 0 Mrs. Garth of Washington avenue will give up her house to be with her sister, Mrs. John Shapleigh, nee Nannie Merritt, this winter. Mrs. Henshaw of New Iberia. La., arrived last week to visit her parents and attend the marriage of her uister Miss Nannie Chouteau. Mrs. Bathurst Smith and partv arrived early this week in New York, and "are daily expected home. Mrs. R. K. Walker is with her. Mr. J. A. Deegan and daughter. Miss May Deegan, of Rolla, Mo., have returned home after a short but pleasant visit to their friends. The Misses Stirling from Louisiana, who have been stopping at the Lindell Hotel, have gone home after a very gay visit with a irty of mends. Mr. and Mrs. Dey M. Hough, nee Shannie Morgan, who were married on the 27th, at Denver, are expected soon and will be located at Hotel Beers. Mi"9,Cl0.ra mith of Cleveland. O.. who was one of the bndemaida at the Vaughn-Jacobs weaain, is rt-inainiug to visit her cousin. Miss Lulu Jacobs. r-ffiI9"iaA'iM' Longweil and her sister, Miss T ?hZt al,nei8'Wa have been visiting friends iu the ity for several weeks past, return home to North Springfield, Mo., to-morrow. Mrs. J. L..D. Morrison entertained the Old Friends Club on Tuesday evening, in compliment to her sister, Mme Puegnet of Paris and her daughters. Misses Gertrude and Jessie Matthews, chaperoned by Mrs. Turner McBain, were at the Southern last week visiting the Exposition and hearing Booth. Mrs. Albert Ridenow has been entertaining her mother, Mrs. BJdenow of Washington, D. C. They spent last week with Mrs. E. W. Harper at Carthage. Mr. Charles Sawyer left Thursday to return to Dallas, Tex. Mrs. Sawyer will not return until the completion of her new home which he is building for her. Mrs.' Wilson Motts who has been spending the past three weeks with her sister Mrs. Dowdy, has returned home, taking her sister with her for a short visit. Miss McRoberts of Danville, Ky., who has been visiting Mrs. Logan Hunter in St. Louis County, has gone to visit Mrs. E. C. Moore of Columbia before returning home. Mrs. Robert Floyd -Jones is visiting this week br cousin, Mrs. Tiernan, of Kansas City, who has been spending the past few weeks in the city with her mother, Mrs. Curtis. Mr. and Mrs. Logan S wope of Independence, who have been visiting Mrs. Arthur Gale of Pine street, are visiting the family of Col. E. C. Moore at Columbia, en route for their home. Mr. and Mrs. nenry Davis celebrated last week their wooden wedding. Among the guests was her sister. Mis. D. P. Woodward, who left soon after to attend the wooden anniversary of her brother at Bunker Hill. The Orion Club, a party of young gentlemen from the best German circles, have sent out handsomely illuminated invitation carus for next Friday evening, which is the date of their first ball for the season at the Germania. Mrs. Berthoud of Laclede avenue, has returned home after six weeks spent delightfully in the East, chiefly in New York City. M;sa Nanuie Berthoud did not return with her mother but remained to visit friends at New Haveu. The wedding and visiting cards executed by the Mermod & Jaccard Jewelry Company, Fourth and Locust, excite universal admiration for their elegance. They only charge $1 for 100 visiting cards from plate and cut; Jl. 50 for 100 cards and finely engraved copper-plate. Cards have been received announcing the marriage ot ftiies Mnmie isrowii, of Capt. Brown of Sherman, Tex daughter 1 to -Ml". Charles Chapman of the same place. The cer emony took place at the residence of the bride's father Wednesday afternoon of the 27th. Mrs. Benson of Chestnut street gave a very delightlul impromptu luncheon on Thursday complimentary to Mrs. Sneed of Frankfort, Ky. Amoug tiie guests were Mrs. Sneed, Miss Sneed, Mrs. Hyde, Miss Chaliie Hyde, Mrs. Walter S. Bartley, Mrs. Winter and others. The table was prettily decorated and the menu served iu courses. A large party of St. Louisans attended last week the golden wedding anniversary of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Clar of Bunker Hill among them Mrs. B. Graham, Misses Jennie and Marie Clark, Mrs Elliott, Mrs. H. Dyson, Mrs. a. ltossner ana airs, ttugnes. i ne -celebration was a very elegant affair, and largely attended uy menus irom a aistance. Mrs. Samuel Gaylord of 3428 Chestnut street, has issued cards lor a reception on Thursday November 4, from 3 to 5 o'clock, introducing her daughter. Miss Daisy Billon, a pretty young ueoutame, wno win oe assisteu m re ceiving by Miss Fannie Kimball, also a debu tante tins season. Mrs. Gaylord will be assisted by her daughter, Mrs. Nat Garland. , x . 1 1 1 . mis. j. ii. uessDorougn gave a ainner on Tuesday in honor of her brother, who is visiting her with bis bride from New York. Dinner was served in the private dining room at Hotel oeers wmi covers laiu lor iourteen guests. The decorations of fruits and flowers and bonbons were very handsome and the menu comprising all the delicacies of the season was served iu many courses. The ladies and gentlemen were iu full dress. Mrs. Charles McLure, nee Clara Edgar, gave a luncheon on Thursday in the private dining-room of Hotel Beers, complimentary to her friend, Mrs. Smith of Milwaukee, nee Garrison. The table was superbly decorated with flowers and French favors, and at each plate was laid a guest-card bearing the name and also the McLure coat of arms. The menu, served in many courses with appropriate wines for each, -consisted of bouillon, blue points, coquilles, orange baskets, croquettes and green peas, boned quail, chicken salad, lancy charlottes and ices, cakes, etc. Misses Minnie and Frances Russell of Chestnut street will give a Hallowe'en or Fireside party to-night, complimentary to their guest, M iss Mabel Brown of Louisville, Kv. The invitations are very unique and artistic. In the upper left-hand coiner is an "interior" done iu India ink, a fireside, with the andirons and logs heaped upon them. On the mantel shelf above is a quaint old clock, with the bands pointing to the hours at which vou are expected to arrive and depart. Then follows the invitation couched in unusual terms. "A vacant" chair. indicated by a gilt chair sketched in the right-hand corner, "awaits thee at our fireside. " Each person is notified to come prepared with a blood -curaling ghost story, to be told with the lights all ioweredl The usual Hallowe'en experiments whereby one may gain an insight into the future will be tried. One of the most noted events of the season will be the kettle-drum, which will be given at the Pickwick on Wednesday, November 10. for the benefit of the St. Louis Children 's Hospital, which was first started under the fostering auspices of Mrs. Frank P. Blair, who was for many years President of the Board of Managers, and is now Vice-President, with Mrs. McKittrick, President; Mrs. Judge Thaver, Secretary, and Mrs. Robert McKittrick Jones, Treasurer. The kettle-drum will be given under the auspices of the Imperial Club. The Pickwick will be handsomely decorated, and the young ladies, dressed to represent different flowers, will entertain the guests, while the matrons will serve tea and waters from the stage. There will be no expense attached beyond the admission fee of 51. Soiering's orchestra will be on hand, so that all who enjoy dancing may have the opportunity of indulging. Among the matrons who have the affair in charge are: Mrs. Watson B. Farr, Mrs. Newman, Mrs. Henry Potter, Mrs. Samuel, Mrs. Ed Glasgow, Mrs. J. H. Louderman and others. Among tho young ladies are: Miss Laura Garrison. Miss Dixie Thaw, Miss Jessie Tutt, Miss Mary Dameron, Miss Mattie Blow, Miss Fannie Samuels, Misses Emma and llilde-garde Sterling. Miss Fanita Hayward, Miss Lulu Scott and others. This will prove a delightful entertainment, and those who enjoy it will assist also a most worthy charity. KNTKRTAINISJG A BRIDAL PARTI. On Monday J. W. Loader of Chestnut street-gave a handsome dinner party complimentary to the Vaughn-Jacobs bridal party. The floral decorations were very handsome, and a menu was served in fourteen courses to eight guests, Miss Clara Jacobs, Miss Lulu Jacobs, Miss Scott of Dayton, O., and Miss Marie Lynch; Messrs Vaughn of Newark, Mr. Bedell of New York, Mr. Guerin of Newark and Mr. Tom Lynch. Miss Vaughn wore a lovely Bordeaux pros grain, carriage length, and bouffante. cut square at the throat, and filled with duchess lace caught by a rose of gold holding a diamond dewdrop in the center. Miss Lulu Jacobs wore pale-blue cashmere combined with garnet velvet, of which the panels which confined the full draperies were composed; corsage cut pompadour. Miss Cora Smith, an elegant black satin rha-dame, richly trimmed with ornaments and pendants ot cut jet; corsage high with gilet of jet; garniture of marigold satin ribbon. Miss Lynch, a handsome jetted toilet, with garniture of pale blue. Mrs. Loader wore tailor-made suit of white lady's cloth, and Mis s Belle Loader rose pink cashmere with garniture of oriental lace. The gentlemen were all in full dress. On Monday Mrs. T. H. Jacobs entertained the same party at a very elaborate dinner at 2 o'clock. The floral decorations were very elaborate, bunches of flowers being provided for each guest. A delightful menu comprising ail of the delicacies of the season was served. Mrs. Jacobs wore black satin rhadames, heavily trimmed with Jet, corsage cut pompadour, and filled with lace. Miss Clara Jacobs wore a poppy red cashmere, draped high over a petticoat of black velvet; corsage montant. Miss Lulu Jacobs wore a verv stylish tailor-made suit of white cloth; Miss Smith wore c'?"au-lait gros grain, made dancing length ana combined with velvet of a deeper toue; miss Lynch wore a handsome gown of peacock blue plush, made visiting length ; Mrs. tester of Dayton, O. , wore garnet velvet, ear-f'"0 length, with trimmings of duchess Y... V ai4onds; Mrs. Cozard, black satin suran. The gentlemen wore full dress K;0n, Tuesday Mr. Vaughn, t thlc to'elect- entertained the bridal party Stiii outnern Hotel dinner atSo'clock. The onette of richly trimmed nunter'i preen faille rrancais. tb iridescent passamenterie lli ?a,l"l8- hat gloves to match, iik Iu i n:b wrea pretty gown of sun. Miss smith .11 of irfl rn efc satin . , ui KifumuK vuurnc 01 utgicK Jacobs pita h?ed w'th cuJet. Miss Luiu pompadour face. ,cash:inere tfinwued ii IllsJ SMOKE GOLDEN BELT CIGA KETTES, Save the empty wrappers, and you can get 2c for each empty wrapper ot u 10c package, and lc for each empty wrapper of a 5c par katre. In any nuatitlt , if presented (with stamps destroyed) before Dec. 31 at the otlice of Blac kweli's Durham Tobacco Co.. 41ii N. Second St., St. Louis, Mo. :or you can get a handsome cabinet photograph, without advertising ou it, for lire empty 10c or ten empty 5c wrappers. PROF. CHS. LUDW1G VON SEEGER, 1 Profetsor of Medicine at the Royal University; ftninht fifth , irnl Atistt.ri.nn. f irii ir- nf th Trym Crown; Knight Commander of the Royal Spanish Order of Isabella; Knight of the Royal Prussian Order of the Red Eagle: Chevalier of the Legion of Honor, cfc, cfc, says: "LIKB1G CO'S COCA BEEF TONIC should not be confounded with the horde of trashy cure alls. It is in no sense of the word a patent remedy. I am thoroughly conversant with its mode of preparation and know it to be not only a legitimate pharmaceut'eal product, but also worthy of the high commendations it has received in all parts of the world. It contains essence of Beef. Coca, Quinine, Iron and C'alisaya, which are dissolved in pure genuineSpani-.il I in nerial Crown Sherry." invaluable to all who are Kun Down. Nervous, Dyspeptic, Bilious, Malarious or afflicted with weak kidneys. Beware of Imitations. Her Majesty's Favorite Cosmetic Glycerine. Used by her Royal Highness the Princess of Wales find Mie nobility. For the &kin. Complexion, B.uptions, Cnapping, Roughness. Sl.OO. Of druggists. L1EB1G CO'S Genuine Syrnn of Sana parilla i3 guaranteed as the best Sarsaparilla iu me markei. Depot 33 MURRAY STREET. N. Y. SKIN TORTURES That Defy All Other Remedies Speedily Cured by Cuticura. nCMTLIATING Ei uptions. Itching and Burning skin Tortures, Loathsome Sores, and every species of Itching, Scaly, 1'imply. Inherited, Scrofulous and Contagious Diseases of the blood. Skin and Scalp, with Loss of Hair, from infancy to old age, are positively cured by C'CTICUKA, the greiit Skin Cure, and CLTI-CCRA Soap, an exquisite Skin Beautifier, externally, and Cuticuka Kesoltem, the new Blood Purifier, internally. COVERED WITH SORES. I have been afflicted since last March with a Skin disease the doctors called Eczema. Mv face was covered with scabs and sores, and the itching and burning were almost unbeatable. Seeing your Cuticcha Remedies so highly rec ommended, concluded to give them atrial, using the Ccticcua and Cuticura Soap exter-. nally and Resolvent internally, for four months. I call myself cured, in gratitude for which I make this public statement. MKS. CLARA A. rUEDEKICK. Bkoad Brook, conn. SCALP, FACE, EARS AND NECK. I was afflicted with Eczema on the Scaln. Face, Ears aud Neck, which the druggist, where 1 got your remedies, pronounced one of the worst cases that had come under his notice. He advised me to try vour Cuticura Remedies, and after five days use my scalp and part of my face were entirely cured, and I hope in another week to have mv ears. neck. and the other part of my face cured. llfcKMA.N fci-ADE. 120 E. 4th Street, New Yokk. ITCHING DIKAMES CniED. Cuticura stands at the head of its class. especially is this the case with the Cuticuka Soap. Have hud an unusually good sale this summer, owing to the prevalence of an aggra vated form ol Itch through some localities in the country, in which the Cuticura Remedies proved satisfactory. . L. HARDIGG. Druggist. Usioxtowx.Kt. CUXK CBA REMEDIES Are sold bv all druggists. Price: CuTtrrrn. 50 cents; Resoi.vf.xt, 51.00; Soap, 25 cents. 1 OTTER DI.UG AND CHEMICAL CO.. Boston. Send for "How to Cure Skin Diseases." PANlln the Complexion and Skin by uing the Cuticura Soap. HOW MY SIDE ACHES! Aching Sides and Back, Hip and Kidney Pains. Rheumatic, Sciatic, Neuralgic, Sharp and Shooting 1'ains. relived in one minute hv the Cuticura Anti-Pain Plaster. Cannot fail. At druggists, 25 cents. Potter Drug and Chem ical Co. , Boston. Moot of the diseases winch uuu'i ni mi. lly caused by a disordered condition 01 the LI V ttm iiir all oumplaints ot this kind, such ae Toruiujiy of the Liver, Biliousness, Nervous Dyspepsia Indigestion, irregularity ot tue Bowels, Consapation Flatulency, Eructations aud burmug ot the blomach (som -time called Heartburn ), Miasma, Malaria, Bloody Hut Cadis aud bover, Breakbone ier. Exhaustion before or after Fevers, Cronic Diarrhoea, Loan of Appetite. Headache, Foul Breath, Irregular ties incidental to Females, BearirR- i"a?wn2..Bac,'"M:he' bTADICER'S AURAN III is invaluable. It is notapauacea the LIVER, STOMACH and BOWELb. It changes tne complexion irom a waxy, yellow tinge, to a ruddy, healtuy color. It entirely removes low. gloomy Kpints. It is one of the 6e AUtraim and Murium of the Hlowi, and . a valuahl tonic STADICER'S AURANTII For salo by ail Drafrgiste. Price S I .OO per bottle. C. F. STADICER, Proprietor, 140 SO. FRONT ST., Philadelphia, Pa. FOR WHISKERS. MUSTACHES AND BALDNESS USE KIRSUTINE. Bmui. UaaW fr"W thm Ml - M U f kMhhi ttai'. t-alaTat raaiiaBKCMrt vrttfc rrn wm ll l '. it. twali ol M tlfl. tiJW'.IMtU f m M tfcs Ml ttym Word " hsur fttmmm k .-. I wtafM nw'i fw m vrui4. O rrr-5 wo ttn ( Ob mr. t? PEC A L Wffc ft llITei. WfaulmllrHNxlLAiltMn J ) pay-king. HxBf rhWfw- ,! w an4 ttm U. t'M, C.( Ml rsUltaa, Uia, G. a. A. "AOE MARK Thos. Sexton & Go,, 600 Market Street. Bole Agents for the TrtL. TT TTT 1 k Mi 1 t- duiui vail, wmup mi Jttanies. Also, for the WEST T0IXT BASE BURN EI! , which is warranted to he the best and most econom-lcal HARD COAL S-TOVE nianufactnred. SPECIAL NOTICEST" Real Estate Office of J as. Cummiskey, No. 1"J North KiKhth Mreet. To the Editor of the Globe-Democrat : ST. Lor is. Mo., October 14, l-fi.navlni r-reutly withdrawn from the firm of Booth. I'.arvla Co.. 1 have opened an otilee at No. J North st'li st where I will conduct a general real estate huine-s ' W itu ati experience 01 kfj ye-rs. and haviniMnp necessary facilities for the proper management ,f real estate placed ih my charge, I am confident .,f render niff satisfaction to all favoring me. with tliecir of their Interests The nuvinir and ."ellin of real . ...v. ..i,viiain.n .11 u.ailB Oil I CMI fMBie. tlR'Tlit ems. and general management of estates e careful aud prompt attention. I.'e-pect will receiv fully. JAMfc I MMlXr.yr 0FFICK Standard School Book Company, fc-i Locust st , sst. Louis, Mo . October i.'ti. IsmJ -1 1". annual meetlnjt of the btockholders of the ManHard f-chool Book Company for the election of IMiec,',.r, ami for the transaction of such other business as m-t come before it. will be held at the otlice ol tin ( ,. l auy. No. sjl Locust St., t. Louis. Mo . on Tuesday, November 9, lss6. attl'e hour of 9 oVWk a iu. ,. i- II. 1111EL, lTesiJenu G. M. Bartlmt, Secretary. DISSOLUTION NOTICES. KTi-!'?,T:,'V ritober ls6fi The former firm U Klotter & !cherer lias been dissolved bv mutual consent. Mr. Charles Klotter succeeds to ihe tmlt ness at the old stand. Ori N. tltli st.. and t eniru j to collect all outstanding, and as-uines all lial.llit'.Hj CHAMI.KS lv I . I I I It. ' J1AKT1N H. HI i:t:u. DOCTOU 617 St. Charles St., St. Louis. 3In. A Itepiilar Graduate of three medical rnlirm has been lonjrer eiiaped in the treatment of Clinmii-, Nervous, bkin and Blood Diseases than anv ..t r physician In 1st. Louis, as city papers show and all . 4 residents know. Consuliatiou at office or by mail, free and invited. A fnendlv talk or opinion ostt notion. AVlien Inconvenient to visit the cltv f ir treatment, meaicines sent bv mall or express ever, v here, secui-elv n.'icked. free from oh erv.iion i ifn. able cases guaranteed; where doubt exists It Is fiault. ly stated. Hours: 9 a. m. to 2 p. in.: 3 p. m. I08 p. m. ; Sundiv, 11 to I. Aervous iTo.tratfon,DeliIit.T.Mntal and Physical Weakness, ariinir from Indiscretion, Excess, Kxposureor Indulgence, producing some of the following effects: Nervousness. Debility, Dimness of tlKht, Perverted Vision, Defective Memory, pimples on the Face, Aversion to Society of t emales. Want of Pleasure In Life. Want of Ambition. Unfitness to Marrv. Melancholy, Uvs- fiepsia, stunted Development. Loss of Power. Paint n the Hack, etc., are treated with unparalleled success. Safely, privately. Curable cases ffuaranteed. Blood 1 111 purines an (J Itlood Poisoning1, Mercurial and other Affections of Throat, Skin and Hones, Blotches, Eruptions, Old Sores and Ulcers, l'aim'ul Swellings, Bone Pains, Fallin? Hair, From whatever cause, positively and forever driven from the syi.tem, by means of safe, time-tested renn--dies Miff and swolen joints and rheumatism, the result of blood ooi-oninfr. positively cured. Unnatural fJiscliarues promptly cured without nauseous drugs, privately, safely. Catarrli, Throat, Nose, Luna Diseases, Constitutional and Acquired Weaknesses ot ltntli Sexes treated sucees.-tuliv ; also Piles It Is self-evident that a phvsician pavlnp particular attention to a class of cases attains irreat skill. Akk and Kxperiem e ave Important. In this oldest otlice In America everv know n appliance is resorted tn and the PKOVKD-GOOH It K1 l.fll Kj of all aire and countries are used. M f charjres for ineiliclues ara a low as can lie nude. I 11 nnlv llie Pest. Very cheap medicine? are danjrerons and useless; avoi' t hem. - On account of the trreat number of cases a , f plyinir. thv! cbarves are kept low, often lower than V demanded hv others, anil knowiutf what to do. FXI'KKI)ll;SIS AUK iiAliK. If you secuC tile .kill And iet at.nee.iv nil r i-f m c thai Iu th Important matter. . MARRIAGE PA2(:?.s. PLATES. Cj I TT D I V . Kiepant cloth and frllt binding. Sealed for M)c la money or postage stamps. Over fiftv wonderful peti pictures true to life; articles on the following suti- jects: AVbo may marry, who not ; whv. Proper ava to marry, w no marry nrst. Manhood; womanhood; physical decay. W ho should marrv. Ynnnir and old, married or single, sick or well shniild mil f ni hoi.k. Popular edition, same as above, but paper rover aud 3U0 pages, 25 ceula by mail, iu money or postage. Grossman's Specific Mixture., With this remedy persons can cure themselves without the least exposure, change oD diet, or change in application to business. The medicine contains nothing that is of th least injury to the constitution. Aak your arugsiat for it. 1'rice. $1 a bottle. MANHOOD. rOI'THKl'L I M TRI dence. Nervous IiehilJtv. cured by iwi.iiic .lent miters, ntje. neri IMed. Co.. Philadelphia. Pa. Uruff llure,6lh i. ahlnvuin av .St.Louu. erv rittfifK lh HarA 'I'(H ; HKI K.S in hours, ciin i lit :i dav . m. r" if 4y M I - ' riiiiaaeipuu-..,! .N.J It nun mil ami vj McMUNN'S ELIXIR OF OPIUIV1 is the pnre extract from the druir from which all t1 hurtful properties are removed and the medical one retained. So heauach. i'n.iivi.nu3. .... ..n-L i.f tha stomach attend iu une. l'rico 60 ceuu. All drup Cuts. .. i! . .. .. ... . ,i"f Electric Belt Free To introduce It and obtain agents we will for the nevt sixty days (rive away, free of chanre, in eachouiuty in tho U. H. a limited number of our ;erni!in l-.levrro inlvnnie HnspensnrT Helt, I'm a positive and umailinur cure for Nervous pcbility. Varicocele. Emissions, ImiKitency tc. $ jti.im Keward paid it every pjlt we manufacture does imt irencn aireuuijieoioctnociirreut. Address at once ELKO 1 1.10 foELX AOLXCY. f. O. Box 1 , 8. Brooklyn. . V. HEALTH " RESTORED.:" Nervous Pbiiitr. JKiiriy Icny, lnnm of Manhood. Waiting Veaknes, A ai.in iioay. Mind. Jtc. qait.it if and prmanentiy cured. Our brochure containing f uii information of a remedy whirh will restore ntrtfc health spot sealed by mail FHF.E to ait atiiu td. Address Tha CUrke Medical Co.. .ast ll&ddain,Cona DB OILJ, TATKI ESS. SO ODOR. PRICE $1. AIM DSCIHtlals KP IT OX 11AXO. IXCOBPOBATED. The onlj reralar Institute of the kiaJ in inn nest. Ladies who expert their ronflnemeal ran be accommodated. , Dr. H. SEW LAND, 120.rj Chouieau avenue. nCSCWCPP Itsriie. and a nev and aocceos. ir.Hi litOU " 1'KK at your o n home, b II who was deaf twenty-etWit rears. TreaUd bv moat of the noted petlallts without benetil. Cured luniclf in three moiiih. andaluce then huudreiia of others. 'ull particular cent 011 applicatbiu. . . . - t 1- C. i'Aul 4,1 Weal 31t i,hewletlt Cltj. TIRE fill a LA hi fan mi JUfi LOST at 11 tiii iTTTTWBaaagHaaaaaiiaJ Private Lfeln Mints!

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