Democrat and Chronicle from Rochester, New York on May 2, 1934 · Page 4
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Democrat and Chronicle from Rochester, New York · Page 4

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Rochester, New York
Issue Date:
Wednesday, May 2, 1934
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Page 4
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t 4 v, ROCHESTER DEMOCRAT AND CHRONICLE, WEDNESDAY. MAY 2. 1034 4 3 Postal wage jbill is vetoed ! AS BAD POLICY I Revenue Boost Giving j Substitutes Work, jj Says Roosevelt i i . ' Washington, May 1- CP) In Ve'olnj t bill fixing minimum 4 Wage (or postal substitutes, Pres-1 jdt , Roosevelt today Informed ft Congress Increased revenues were i providing mora work for tha sub-j aUtute carrier! who hava been Idle Jn many instance. 51 Ha vetoed tha legislation on the ground that It "la contrary to ( jiubllo policy In that It provide j compensation to a certain clam of Jjamployea regardless of tha need for .their services.' M "It la dlecrlmlnary and tstab- Jlsha a precedent which. If fol- Jowed, would undoubtedly lead to tetany abuaea," he added. f Postmaster-General Farley In letter to tha President announced that Increased business had justified him In restoring annual vacations with pay to tha regular forces Immediately. "Tha allmlnation of tha furloughs and restoration of vacation," eald Farley, "together with the resumption of normal service to meet the essential needs of tha patrons, will provide Immediate employment, particularly In tha .larger cities where the unemployment baa been most noticeable." . I CTUJTIK8 MAN POISONED i Chicago. May J-UP-Wllam I Caulfleld Sharp, 66, Identified by paper as a former vice president t Middle West Utilities Company, was found poisoned In his hotel 'room today and was taken to the Jounty hospital for emergency treatment SMITH- L A T Z HERE'S your AMERICAN COLFER fsi aivtrlitti In Fe i Htrftrt) Excluiivr milk Smith-Lilt Made of Lorraine Shir-O-Shaker it cannot shrink or fade. Tub without ironing and the gay colors will be like new. The blouse with "ted" bottom takes the place of undies and stays place from tee-off nineteenth hole, stripes, checks plaids. Sizes 14 in to In or to 40, the price ... 6.50 STORE YOUR FURS Don't wait heat, moths, fire and theft are constant menaces with your valuable furs hanging at home. The newest methods for their protection are yours when you "Store (Tie Smith-Latz Way." SMITH-LATZ ffl Maia St. East Ps President Receives 'Buddy Poppy' n,A,,.mfnq,r O mi it w GRAVES LEADS ALABAMA RACE TO TOP TICKET Heflin Trails 3-Man Race in Attempt At Comeback Birmingham, Ala., May 1 JF Former Governor ' Bibb Graves jumped lut In front lata tonight in the tabulation of returns from today's Democratic primary, bis leading mounting steadily, while In Fifth congressional district, on scattering returns, former Senator J. Thomas Henin, trailed in a three man race In his attempted "comeback." Tabulation of 620 ballot boxes out of, 2,117 In the state gave Gravea 19,338 votes, Major Frank M. Dixon of Birmingham 13,141 and Judge Leon McCord of Montgomery 10,706. Bloux Falls, 8. D., May 1 (.11 Governor Tom Berry, and Representative Theodore B. Werner, Democrats, and former Representative C A. Christopherson, Republican, apparently were successful in today's primary election on tha face of returns available late tonight, with the outcome of the two remaining major contests still In doubt. ' Dog Leads Way To Body of Youth Lock port. May 1 CW Led by a dog that acratched at tha dour, George Sllsey, a farmer, found tha body of his son, Clayton, 21, killed by a prematura blast of dynamite while he was blasting stumps In a field. , Young Silsey, accompanied by the dog, want Into the field yesterday to remove stumps. The dog returned to the farm house In the evening and tha elder Sllsey, alarmed by the animal's actions followed It back to the field where he found hie son's body. The Silsey farm-In on The "Clayton settlement road, about five miles north of Lock port, 3,000 Go on Strike At Ontario Paper Mill Fort Frsnces, Ont., May 1 .Pi-Three thousand pulp and paper mills employes struck today after a deadlock In negotiatona between two companies and their workers. The men ask an increase In pay. a 36-hour week and a new employment contract. Present basic wages are 35 cent in hour. The companies effected are the M. ft O. Papers Company. International falls, and the Fort Frances Pulp It Paper Company. First 2 Cars Cross New Span to Canada Massena, May 1 .T1 The first two cara over the new Cornwall-Northern New York International bridge across the St. Lawrence river crossed today from Rooeevel-town to Cornwall. They contained members of Mayor Thomas S. Bushwell'a committee of Mayor Aaron Horovita to arrange plana for the formal opening of the bridge June 30. STEAMER ARRIVALS At New York: Bvron. fmm Piraeus; Westernland, from Antwerp; Volendam, frOm Rotterdam; Cameronia, from Glasgow; American Banker, from London: He de Franca, from Havre; Majestic, from Southhampton. At Montreal; Ausonla, from London. At Cobh: Manhattan, from New York. At Rotterdam: Rotterdam, from New York. At Oslo: Frederik VIIL from New York. At Gothenburg; Grlpsholm, from New York. Littl Muriel Morgan, 3, cam all tha way from the home for widows and orphans maintained by tha Veteran of Foreign Wart at Eaton Rapids. Mich., to I present the first "Buddy Poppy" of the year to President Roose-velu James E. Van Zandt, commander-in-chief of the veterans, who accompanied her, looks on approvingly. Asio-ated Pre Photo. A 17 rA.Yj v i. BANK PAY-OFF COST A BILLION, SAYSTREASURY Sees Recoveries Only $724,088,196 Under Deposit Proposal .Washington, May 1 (.PiSecre-tary Morgenlhau today estimated the federal government would lose a billion dollars If called upon to carry out the McLeod bank depewit pay-orr bill. The secretary estimated Initial cost of p.ilting the measure under way would be $1,807,299,942 and the eventual loss $1,083,211,746.. Mr. Morgenthau made It clear In a communication to Representative itfown ID., Mlch.V, that his figures were Only rough estimates since it would be necessary to have an analysis of the condition of each bimk to reach an accurate figure. The secretary's estimate of the Initial cost would carry out only that provision In the McLeod measure which provides for a payment to each depositor In a closed hank up to $2,500 of his claim. Past payments would be Included In that figure. Of the total cost. Secretary Morgenthau wrote Brown ha could see only $T24.088,t96 In recoveries. He said the estimates did not in elude any Interest costs pending final liquidation of the cloned in stitutions. Brown made the Inquiry at the request of Chairman Steagall (D., Ala.), of the House Banking Com. mittee. Secretary Morgenthau did not offer a guess of the expenditure necessary to carry out the other sections of the bill. The most Important of these Is an authorize tlon for the Reconstruction Finance Corporation to purchase up to 85 per cent of the remaining assets from the banks and advaance loans on them. 2 Brothers Jailed In Woman's Death uwego woman Miicd as HI She Aids Husband Binghamton, May 1 .Pl Two brothers were under arrest as Brooms County authorities Inves tigated a brawl In an endlcott restaurant which early today resulted in tne death or a woman and sen ou Injury to her husband. Ths woman, Mrs. Lena Snow Dunham. 38. of Oweao. knocked down by one of the two men who were pummellng her husband. Sterling Dunham, when she stepped In between him ami hlr assailants. Cororner J. Edgar Polg said her neck apparently was broken as was her husband's nose. Witnesses told police ont of the two assailants was Thomas Flynn, 33, of Endlcott. He was picked up a few minutes later as he aped by the place In an automobile. Later, Flynn's brother, John, was arrested. Police said his clothes were stained with blood. PLANS MEDICAL STIDIE9 Theodora T. Slocum of Scotts-vllle, Cornell University senior, will enter Washington University Medical School, Washington, D. C, next year. Minister's Son Invents Invisible Ear Drum The Invisible Ear Drum Invented by A. O. Leonard, a son of a widely known Methodist minister, for his own relief from extreme deafness and hrad noiss. has so greatly improved his hearing that he can join in sny ordinary conversation. a lo ineaire ana near without difficulty. Inexpensive and has proven a blc-mg to mny people. Write In booklet to K U Leonard, Inc., Suite 8M. 70 Fifth Avenue, New York City. Advertisement ACTOR'S WIFE FILES SUIT FOR MAINTENANCE Mrs Bennett Declares Husband Struck Her, Threatened Life Los Angeles, May 1 (.Pi Suit for separata maintenance was filed today by Mrs. Angela Ralsch Ben nett against Richard Bennett, prominent stage and screen actor. The suit charged the actor beat his wife, threatened to kill her Ith a pistol and once stabbed her through tha cheek with a nail Me. Mrs. Bennett askslhal her hus band be restrained from disposing of community property valued In excess of $75,000. She also petitioned the court to award her $3,- 000 monthly for living expenses, $5,000 for legal fees and $1,000 for court costa. Bennett, the father of Constance, Joan and Barbara Bennett, all screen actressefl. was described as a person of mcnlucal moods." Mrs. Bennett, formerly prominent In San Francisco society, alleged the actor "so beat and struck" her last month aha was forced to go to a hospital. The complaint recited that on another occasion, Mrs. Bennett was struck, beaten and stabbed through her cheek with a nail file. As a result of the attack, the woman charged, it was necessary to sub mit to medicaj and surgical treat ment This assault, the complaint The Worsted-tex Suits LINED WITH $42 You see in Worsted-tex a suit of the finest type. It is sold at the moderate price of $42 because the makers have spent years and years of study and intense concentration on a single idea. You. will not find this cloth in any other suit. It is exclusive and every pattern is exclusive. The models are designed to get away from the ready-to-wear appearance and to give you that custom-tailored look, . - We have been selling Worsted-tex Suits to our best customers for many, many years. Let iis show them to you. Stop in. SECOND FLOOR Do-Do-De-Do-Ho-De-Wa-Da Claimed Boop-a-Doop Parent New York, May 1 (United News) Court stenographers who have struggled to record in shorthand the "boop-oop-doop's" of Helen Kane ware on the verge of hysterica tonight. ' Supreme Court Judge Edward J. McGoldrlck ordered them to set down ''Po-do-de-do-ho-de-wa-da-de-da." The "Boop-oop-a-doop" trial, In which Helen Kane seeks $250,000 damages from the animated carton creators of "Betty Boop," became this complicated when Lou Bolton testified, for the defense, Bolton testified that nine yeara ago In Chicago he taught Baby Esther, a negro child under his management, to interpolate "Do-do- read, took place In "an Oklahoma hotel." Mrs. Bennett also alleged she was ln mortal fear of her Ufa" due to "Bennett allegedly threatening to kill her with a pistol and then commit suicide. "On occasions too numerous to mention," the complaint recited, Bennett called his wife "vllo, Indecent and opprobrious names, too filthy and profane to set forth, all of which caused plaintiff to suffer great humiliation and mental anguish." During the latter part of last March, Mrs. Bennett alleged, she found her husband In his bedroom, "clothed only in a bedroom robe," In company of his Zemale secretary," She related she protested against his conduct and was told by Bennett "If rne did not like It she could leave." Mrs. Bennett declare In the document that Bennett "flies Into rages and tempers with no provocation whatsoever where this plaintiff li concerned." The complaint set forth that the fend SUPER - CELANESE SIBLEY, LINDSAY de-do-ho-de-wa-da-de-da" between the bars of music In popular songs. "Will you spell that 7" asked court stenographer. "I can't, replied the witness. "Put It down as It sounds,' or-; dered Judge McGoldrlck. Bolton said Miss Kane heard Baby Esthers song treatment here In 1928 and shortly afterward began her famous "booping." Testimony alsowas heard today from Bonny Poe and Margie Hines. two petite, piping-voiced misses who said they were hired by the Max Fleischer studios as voices for Betty Boop after winning "Helen Kane contests." Miss Hines said she won a preliminary contest before she ever heard Miss Kane. couple were mairled July 11, 1927, and separated last Apr. 3. A complaint charging battery was issued against the actor several weeks ago at the request of Mrs. Bennett, but later the charge was dismissed. Gen. Scott to Have Burial in Arlington Washington, May 1 (United News) Gen. Hugh L. Scott, who pushed the American frontier westward against the Indians, will be burled Wednesday In Arlington National Cemetery. His life, rich in fame and the traditions of the Wild West, ended last night after a two months Illness. Although much of the first half of Scott's life was devoted to sorties against the Sioux, In his riper years he became the trusted friend of the Indian. The Library of Congress recogniied him as the outstanding expert in the sign language of the plains. of doth :'-:.'':-'':-V''; STORE FOR MEN- 1 DENY OIL THEFT Arraigned In City Court yester- day on charges of burglary, third degree, and petit larceny, Cyrus Ayres, 32, of 9 Wayne Place, and Clarence Ball, 25, of 448 Froet Ave - jfST MS.SMITH THIS HARD L SHNG f s3$$i MRS. BROWN JM FOR rich, hard-working suds on washday, use your regular laundry soap, your regular washing method then add 2 tablespoons or to of LUX. This gives gorgeous suds. Speeds up washing leaves clothes lovely! NOTE i Use only Liu no other soap for silks, woolen, rayons. Delicate fabrics should never be expoicd to harib alkali or cake-soap rubbing. wUm. ,f '1 In l'f mm snkfi Above is the self check, one of the newest and smartest patterns. Of course there are many other patterns blended plaids, subdued pencil stripes, mixtures and smart plain shades. & CURR nue, pleaded not guilty. Their casa was adjourned to May 22. Tha two j are accused of breaking Into a I gas station operated by John Rlcey at 500 Frost Avenue and stealing ' gasoline and oil. CO.

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