The Palm Beach Post from West Palm Beach, Florida on December 7, 1997 · Page 94
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December 7, 1997

A Publisher Extra Newspaper

The Palm Beach Post from West Palm Beach, Florida · Page 94

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West Palm Beach, Florida
Issue Date:
Sunday, December 7, 1997
Page:
Page 94
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THE PALM BEACH POST SUNDAY, DECEMBER 7, 1997 6E Bully of Baghdad got away with murder From World War II to the Gulf War, America has made major mistakes in foreign policy and in military strategy over the years. Our goal should be never to repeat them. ' ' came from the Far East, not from Europe. In retaliation for Japan's military assault on China in 1937 and its occupation of Indochina in 1940, Roosevelt halted the shipment of rubber, gasoline, steel and iron to Japan and froze that country's assets in the U.S. He hoped to stop Japan's aggression through economic sanctions. The strategy did not work. Japan proceeded to attack the American fleet and seize the Philippines, Guam, Wake Island, Singapore and other valuable lands on the Pacific Rim. ; Before Pearl Harbor, no one in the Far East had tried to stop Japan's land grab.; In Europe, no one had tried to halt the aggression of Germany and Italy before September 1939. The League of Nations, without the U.S. among its members, demonstrated no courage and no strength as Hitler took over most of Western Europe, Italy invaded Ethiopia and Japan invaded China. ; We learned that a brute is not stopped by appeasement That is why the United Nations was founded. Although it often has proved flaccid in trying to prevent conflict, it remains a valuable weapon in the fight for peace, i History may appear old and creaky j to many people. But it is the lesson book from which we learn and Pearl Harbor has proved a lasting lesson. ' TYRANTS FnwJ " Hussein underestimated Mr. Bush's resolve ki that showdown, and he may have miscalculated President Clinton's in the current confrontation. Mr. Clinton is the first president since Pearl Harbor who has no actual memory of the attack that propelled America into war on the quiet day of Dec. 7, 1941. But that fateful Sunday, when carrier-based Japanese war-planes decimated much of America's Pacific fleet as it lay at anchor, is etched in the consciousness of every American who was alive at the time. , - It was a tragedy that cannot and should not be forgotten. From that event we learned, as we never had before, that when despots are on the rampage, their villainy knows no bounds. World War II provided Mr. Clinton's 10 immediate predecessors, from Franklin D. Roosevelt to Mr. Bush, with an invaluable standard of reference in the conduct of national security policy based on nations working in unison to try to halt tyranny. Along with the lessons gleaned from that conflict, however, we learned other lessons from Vietnam. We learned that we must never enter a war without a clear understanding of the resolve possessed by our enemy and the unity or disunity of our own people; we must never again fight a war we cannot win or one that does not have the official sanction of' Congress. ' , One of America's wisest military leaders, Gen. George C. Marshall, once said: "It is not enough to fight It is the spirit which we bring to the fight mat decides the issue. It is morale that wins the victory." We have made major mistakes in foreign policy and in military strategy over the years. , Our goal should be never to repeat them. From the moment England and France declared war against Hitler's Germany in September 1939, many Americans, including President Roosevelt, were determined to provide the Third Reich's victims with all the aid possible short of war. Isolationists, who were extremely influential in the nation's political life, saw Lend-Lease and other programs of aid to Britain, Russia and China as acts of war. Then to the surprise of most Americans, the act that decided our entry into Combat 0)1 7 y I-- wwlk n I O V7 i'AraO fl n n nyyfrof) Ik Strife cols including advanced treatments that can make a life-saving difference when administered within three hours after a stroke occurs. Our Stroke Centers will be the only ones in Palm Beach County equipped with on-site CT scanners so you can be diagnosed and treated without delay. We also provide comprehensive care for stroke victims, from complete emergency and hospital treatment to rehabilitation and home care. So at the first sign of a stroke, call 9-1-1 immediately. And get medical attention fast. A stroke occurs when the oxygen supply to your brain is cut off, resulting in serious, and often permanent, neurological damage. Stroke is the third leading cause of death and the number one cause of disability in the nation. That's why it's critical to call 9-1-1 immediately if you experience any of these warning signs. At The Stroke Centers at Good Samaritan and St. Mary's, we're ready to treat you the moment you arrive. Our stroke teams are led by neurologists who specialize in diagnosing and caring for stroke patients, with special proto- . Sudden weakness or numbness of the face, arm or leg on one side of the body. 2. Sudden dimness or loss of vision, particularly in one eye. 3. Loss of speech, or trouble talking or understanding speech. 4. Sudden severe headaches with no known cause. 5. Unexplained dizziness, unsteadiness or sudden falls, especially along with any of the previous symptoms. Symptoms appear suddenly with no apparent cause. If you experience any of these warning signs, call 9-1-1 immediately. THE STROKE CENTERS AT GOOD SAMARITAN S ST. MARY'S Affiliates of Intracoastal Health Systems, Inc. Intracoastal Health Systems, Inc. is Palm Beach County's largest, community-based, not-for-profit health system. If your group would like a presentation on stroke from The Stroke Centers' team at Good Samaritan & St. Mary's Medical Centers, call 561-650-6240. m 9 MHHMHHIIIHnHi t

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