The Palm Beach Post from West Palm Beach, Florida on December 4, 1997 · Page 284
Get access to this page with a Free Trial
Click to view larger version
December 4, 1997

A Publisher Extra Newspaper

The Palm Beach Post from West Palm Beach, Florida · Page 284

Publication:
Location:
West Palm Beach, Florida
Issue Date:
Thursday, December 4, 1997
Page:
Page 284
Cancel
Start Free Trial

Page 284 article text (OCR)

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 4, 1997 3 The Palm Beach Post m sl SECTION FN QUICK BITES INSIDE LIFE OF THE PARTY Homemade eggnog or a fruit concoction are sure to please ; at your holiday gathering. : PAGE 4FN JAVA AND LAMS Instead of using stock or water for a lamb stew or casserole, try adding black coffee. It complements lamb surprisingly well and makes the .meat juices rich. DINING FOOD Beans can bail you out at dinner 5 By Alicia Ross, with Beverly Mills Special to the Palm Beach Post ; "; ;pne of our favorite desperation din-net solutions is to rely on pantry-based jrecipes. If you can stash away ingredi-feOts when you're not stressed out, rey can be a welcome relief during those times when you are. : Today's recipe uses fresh bell pep A r& EXUBERANT PI pers, but 11 you re fresh out of those at the moment when desperation hits, just leave the peppers out entirely. Menu: Bail-out beans with corn chips; simple green salad with bottled 1 DESPERATION ' DINNERS dressing. I r) 1 ml i i In 1 " 7 " : i Bail-out beans ByJanNorris 1 Palm Beach Post Food Editor The sizzling-hot TV chef kicks it up a notch with a new cookbook, an award-winning show and two more restaurants in the works. BOCA RATON Emeril Lagasse is digging enthusiastically into a plate of stone crabs at lunch after a recent book-signing. He loves food, almost any kind of food, with one exception. "I can't think of anything I won't eat, except fast food," he said. The hyperkinetic, hugely popular TV chef blames that very same fast food for the downfall of family dining in America. But Lagasse (pronounced la-GAS-ee) is trying to change all that. He happens to be at the top of the cooking world's A-list at the moment. Lagasse is running three successful restaurants in New Orleans and Las Vegas, opening a couple more by the end of next year, touring the country to promote his new cookbook (Emeril's Creole Christmas), and hosting an award-winning TV show, Emeril Live! On this day, however, after signing more than 1,200 books at Liberties bookstore, he's running low on energy. He's also very hungry. "I haven't had anything to eat to speak of in three days," he said. "To make a long story short (though he never quite manages), I won't eat airline food, and I was on a plane all day yesterday. Then we didn't get out of the event last night until 2:30 this morning. I Please see mmUZFN 1 teaspoon olive oil 1 large onion (or 1 cup chopped) IV2 teaspoons bottled minced garlic V2 large red or green bell pepper (or cup chopped) Vi large yellow bell pepper (or cup chopped) 1 can (15 ounces) pinto beans 2 cans (15 ounces each) black beans 1 teaspoon dried oregano 1 teaspoon balsamic vinegar V teaspoon cayenne pepper (omit if serving children) 3 ounces (about 28) low-fat tortilla chips 1 medium ripe tomato, optional low-Tat or fat-free sour cream, , optional , Heat the oil over medium heat in a 12-inch extra-deep, nonstick skillet that has a lid. Peel and coarsely chop the onion, adding it to the skillet as you chop. Add the garlic and cook, stirring from time to time. -' - Meanwhile, rinse and seed the bell peppers. Coarsely chop half of each . pepper, adding it to the skillet as you chop. (Reserve the remaining pepper halves for another use.) Cook until the onions and peppers are soft, about 2 minutes. Meanwhile, rinse and drain the pinto beans and 1 can of the black beans. Add the drained pintos and black beans and the undrained black beans to the skillet. Add the oregano, vinegar and cayenne pepper. Stir and raise the heat to high, and let the mixture cook until the liquid begins to reduce, about 5 minutes. While the beans cook, mash some of them with the back of a spoon or fork to thicken the mixture. If using the tomato, chop it into bite-size pieces and set aside. Place 7 tortilla chips in each of 4 bowls and set aside. , When the beans are done, spoon them over the chips in each bowl. Garnish with tomato chunks and a dollop of sour cream, if desired. Serves 4. HOOKING NEW FANS Chef Emeril Lagasse has won over audiences especially men with his simple, fun approach to cooking. I shoot TV for fun. That's the God's honest truth. I'm not all wrapped up in that stuff. It's fun I'm havin' a blast!" "When I was doing Real and Rustic Louisiana I learned the appreciation for simple ingredients. A roux is a roux. You're not going to have blueberries in it." "Cooking is cool right now, and not just with guys, but with girls, with the kids everybody." "People said, 'TV? You gotta be nuts!' But if I can get one person interested or touch one person a day, I'm happy. And we are reaching tons of people, so I'm happy, happy!" 001(1 E B AKER! CRUNCH Tl ME for C Queen of the Court swears vegetarian diet a winner ' f ByJanNorris Palm Beach Post Food Editor ; Think you love cookies? Well, put your t passion up against Helen Dullaghan's. This ! i Lake Worth woman takes a week off work during the holidays to churn out hundreds of i J cookies just to give away. ; "Our whole kitchen table was filled with ' cookies last year," Dullaghan said. She and her mother, Virginia Ryan, 74, make it an . annual project. "It's quality time to spend with'. I mom," Dullaghan said. They give the cookies 4 to local firefighters, police, co-workers and J neighbors. "It's all in the spirit of giving," she( said. t She's not in an organized cookie exchange, ? but there are many of those around. These are groups of home bakers who meet and ex- 4 change by the dozen their homemade treats. I I Everyone takes home a variety. ; j Carol Csomay is a longtime member of the Delray Beach Cookie Bake. The members of J the group go to one person's house, mix their -' doughs, bake the cookies, and exchange them all in one day. J "Part of the fun is baking them off right ! there," she said. "Sometimes some of the ' ; women will make their doughs up in advance, , ' so they can start baking right away. Yeah, we . 1 eat some of the cookies there, too they're ' Please see COOKlfSW. bit Mff - 4 -i -7"' By Jan Norm Palm Beach Post Food Editor If she had known how good it felt to be a vegetarian, Martina Navratilova would have gone without meat a long time ago. "I did it for philosophical reasons the health benefits came later." The diet has clearly helped her tennis playing, she said. "I perform better than ever now," she said in a recent visit to Palm Beach. She was in town meeting with Chris Evert about the Virginia Slims Legends Tour (Delray Beach Tennis Center, Saturday and Sunday). "I was telling Chris yesterday I am less stiff, I warm up much quicker than 10 years ago," she said. "When I became a vegetarian five years ago, I started in January. I played my first tournament in May in Italy that year. It was cold, raining; but I didn't get as stiff as I would have before in that kind of weather. It used to take me a long time to get my joints and muscles warmed up." No one would call her old at 34. The Queen of the Court (she holds the most singles women's tennis titles in the world) still reigns over most tournaments she plays. She also plays hard at playing snowboarding, snow skiing, basketball and golf. Though her diet isn't unique among athletes, it's still enough of a novelty that she has to look for food on Please see NAVRATILOVA Martina Navratilova says her vegetarian diet has helped her tennis. 'I perform better than ever now,' she says. IANNIS WATERSStaff Photographer Outside, clockwise from top: almond stamped cookies, Florentines, strawberry-topped chocolate cheesecake bar, almond cookies, raspberry swirl pinwheels. Inside: pecan crescents. Center: whAe-chocolate-covered Ritz-Bits, love tortes.

Get full access with a Free Trial

Start Free Trial

What members have found on this page