The Palm Beach Post from West Palm Beach, Florida on December 4, 1997 · Page 230
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December 4, 1997

A Publisher Extra Newspaper

The Palm Beach Post from West Palm Beach, Florida · Page 230

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West Palm Beach, Florida
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Thursday, December 4, 1997
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Page 230
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THURSDAY, DECEMBER 4, 1997 The Palm Beach Post nc SECTION E INSIDE INSIDE 'Season to Share' helps families have happy holidays and successful lives. COUPON, PAGE 3E ACCENT GOOD NEWS Catch the good word on area people who've gone the extra mile and have done well for themselves and others. PAGE 3E Palm Beach County Living . YF Those who fall in love late in life say the butterflies still flutter, the heart still throbs and the romance is as delicious as ever. ! Who says passion is only for the young? y ; . y - Low is lovelier ijnig second time around. A gorilla named Michael (left), painted the above work and, through sign language, titled it Anger. HEATHER SELWITZStaff Photographer David Heller and Pearl Eisner 'are together all day, and at 9 p.m. he kisses me good night and returns to his house."' Apes throwing monkey wrench into art world When Cupid gets his second wind, look out. We asked readers to describe late-life love, and! most said it's deja vu all over again the same ; tongue-tied, heavy-breathing, sappy, mushy, hor- ; mone-powered roller coaster ride that left them j woozy the first time. Unlike chicken pox, succumbing to love when I you're young does not confer immunity for your ! later years. ! As for whether passionate sex is possible in later years, many female respondents, while omitting descriptive detail that is certainly of no interest here, appended the following response: Yes! Yes! Yes! . : (We can't be sure they ' ; weren't faking. We'll just have to take them at their word.) ; Of the 72 couples who wrote,' faxed and e-mailed, most were I widowed after long, rewarding marriages and were sheepish to find themselves smitten. One exception to the happy Ron Wiggins .... i. , . .. ft ;, t i f I j ' . - ' . : " .' " " ' "'" " . : ' " r: . :'.' . .' - . '''''. ' ,' V. -, ' . . : ' r , t : m Ms vV - i ' ' . By Sarah Boxer The New York Times "Give! give! give! . . . Brush! brush!" "What color do you like best, Tatu?" "Black black!" "And you, Washoe. What color?" "Red, red!" "Why?" "Beautiful, beautiful!" "Do you prefer to paint or to eat?" "Eat, paint, eat, paint, painting good!" Two chimpanzees, Tatu and Washoe, are discussing their ideas about color and painting in sign language with their human handler. They are by no means the only apes in the art world. Koko and Michael, gorillas living in Woodside, Calif., are now exhibiting their work on the Web (www.gorilla.org). And last year, Cheeta, Tarzan's sidekick, became the first chimp to have his works exhibited in the National Gallery in London. (He took up painting after retiring from his film career.) It is no surprise that apes like to paint. There was a brief craze for ape art in the late 1950s. What is new now is that they are doing what their handlers insist is representational art. Francine Patterson, president of the Gorilla Foundation, a group dedicated to the preservation of gorillas, said the paintings by Koko and Michael "represent things in the real world." How does she know? When she asks what they're painting, they tell her. This is a switch from the way things were 40 years ago. In the late 1950s, arguably the high Renaissance of ape art, Desmond Morris, a British writer and ethologist with an interest in Surrealism, discovered a chimp named Congo who Could paint bold, rapid works that looked something like the action paintings of the Abstract Expressionists. Indeed, at the peak of his career many people viewed his works as a cheap attack on the splatter paintings of Jackson Pollock and the bold abstractions of Franz Kline. I : But mockery was not Morris' intention. He was interested in producing an "esthetic theory "of ape art." After conducting a series of controlled experiments at the London Zoo with Congo, he found his subject had a great sense of balance, color, playfulness and a varied repertory of dots, scapings and strokes. Congo favored a fan motif. He was self-motivated and moody about his finished work. "Congo would put down his brush or hold it Please see APE ART3 earlier marriage trend was Pearl Eisner of Delray Beach, who for 50 years was married to a man of cultivated tastes and high intellect. For all his sophistication, Eisner's husband could not bring himself to hold her hand when crossing the street or buy her a birthday card, much less say that he loved her. But: he was learned. "When my husband was cremated," she observes dryly, "a library burned down." Widowed at 71, Pearl decided she had no time to waste. "I grieved for 20 minutes and went knocking on my neighbor David's door." Himself widowed six months earlier, David Heller was definitely at home. "Unlike my late husband, this kind and handsome man is uneducated, but he knows the meaning of love. We are together all day, and at 9 p.m. he kisses me good night and returns to his house." Pearl still remembers her mother's admonition not to sleep with a man until he marries you. "But she never said anything about taking naps." And anyway, David has promised to marry Pearl if she gets pregnant. "So we're trying." When Gene and Margaret Turnbull of North Palm Beach fell in love after losing mates, they had a head start. They were pre-smitten, having dated as . high school seniors in Kearsy, NJ. in 1940. "World War II came along and we separated, and went on to marry different people." Please see W1GGINS4E More stories from other late-life lovers, Page 4E SHERMAN ZENTStaff Photographer Pat Koblentz and Allen Palent met on a golf course when she was 67 and he was 70. 'Before I knew it we were both 16 again! We couldn't believe it!' Koblentz says. Do you look like Santa (or know someone who does)? HO, HO, HO, HELP! We're cooking up some special holiday goodies for you, dear readers, but to make them work ' we need to hear from you: Tell us about your special ornaments Do you have a favorite Christmas tree ornament one that's been in your family for years or that has special significance? Tell us what makes the ornament special, and include a picture if possible. We'll feature ornaments in an upcoming Home & Garden section. Letters must be Share your Christmas miracles We're looking for heartwarming tales of holiday surprises. Maybe your soldier husband got home on furlough just in time for Christmas Mass. Maybe a child's holiday wish was granted at the last minute by an unlikely source. Heck, maybe you and your pregnant wife somehow got a room at a no-vacancy inn on a snowy Christmas Eve. Share your Christmas miracles with us. By Dec. 12, send a short description of the event, along with your name, address and daytime phone number to: Christmas Miracles Accent Department The Palm Beach Post P.O. Box 24696 West Palm Beach, Fla. 33416-4696 Or fax us: 820-4445. Or e-mail us: www.goPBI.comtellthepost n r ! S ' -V.- . j . . . '''' v! ". -8.. 1 , f ' V-. Do you or someone you know neighbor, co-worker, plumber look like Santa Claus? Might he be the jolly old elf? Send us a photo of your nominee. We'll choose finalists and hold a special Santa competition to determine the winner. And trust us: The prize will be better than cookies and milk! Please be sure to include your name and phone number as well as the name and phone number (and a picture!) of your nominee. Send entries by Dec. 10 to: Santa Look-Alikes Accent Department The Palm Beach Post P.O. Box 24696 West Palm Beach, Fla. 334164696 postmarked by Dec. 8. Send to: Holiday Ornaments Accent Department The Palm Beach Post P.O.' Box 24696 West Palm Beach, Fla. 33416-4696 LOREN G. HOSACK1989 STAFF RLE PHOTO T

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