Democrat and Chronicle from Rochester, New York on October 22, 2015 · Page A7
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October 22, 2015

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Democrat and Chronicle from Rochester, New York · Page A7

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Rochester, New York
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Thursday, October 22, 2015
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Page A7
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DemocratandChronicle .com E2 Thursday,October22,2015 Page7A lease. “Officer Daryl P ierson devoted his life to d efending his country and protecting the comm unity he shared with all o f us.” Pierson was killed on Sept. 3, 2014, while chasing Thomas Johnson III on Hudson Avenue. Johns on was later convicted of m urder and sentenced to 25 years to life. He was a m ember of department’s T actical Unit and was recognized for his efforts to remove illegal firearms from the streets of Rochester. H e was survived by his w ife, Amy Pierson, and two small children. T he post office, built in 1 936, is located on West Commercial Street in East Rochester and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. J HAND@Gannett . com Pierson Continued from Page 3A All is right with the w orld. The Oatka, Black, Honeoye and Canaseraga creeks are themselves once again. As I noted a couple of weeks ago, the ubiquitous Google Maps had mistakenly stripped away the namesof those four creeks, and perhaps o thers, from their online m apping application. In t heir place Google had ins erted the words “Genesee River,” thus routing t hat river into places where it doesn’t really g o. T hose creeks are trib- u taries to the Genesee, and one could speculate something had gone awry deep in the bowels of Google Maps’ difference engine. Jim Memmott, our columnist, heard from someone who pays undue attention to Google Maps t hat the problem is fixed, a nd so it seems to be. Oat- k a is Oatka once again, a nd the others too. What a relief. Google Maps r estores area creeks’ names STEVE ORR @SORR1 Current Byron-Bergen Superintendent Casey Kosiorek will take over as superintendent in Hilton in January, the district announced Wednesday. H e will take over for David Dimbleby, who is r etiring. He was chosen over two other finalists, Monroe 1BOCES Deputy Superintendent Michael D oughty and Spencerport Assistant Superintendent Daniel Milgate. "We have taken great care to select our next l eader and are confident t hat Casey will carry on the tradition of keeping our schools at the heart of the community,” School Board President Daniel W ellington said in a state- m ent. Kosiorek has been superintendent in Byron- Bergen, in Genesee County, since 2012. Be- f ore that, he was an ele- m entary school principal in Le Roy. His appointment will be made official at the Oct. 27 school board meeting. J MURPHY7@ G annett.com New schools chief named in Hilton JUSTIN MURPHY @CITIZENMURPHY PROVIDED Casey Kosiorek seat. Frankel stressed her track record of getting things done during her 20-year tenure as Brighton town supervisor, citing specific examples s uch as cutting taxes five t imes in the suburb. S he pointed to the county’s label as the most fiscally stressed in the state, according to the state comptroller, and vowed to eliminate corruption and restore fiscal stability to a county that she argued has seen too many years of Republic an mismanagement. “ It is time for a new dir ection — we deserve n othing less,” said Frankel. Dinolfo has been county clerk for over a decade and worked in civil litigation with an Irondequoit law firm before that. She emphasized her commitment to making Monroe County’s government “the most ethical in the nation,” adding that she knows what it takes to keep property taxes stab le and grow business. Barnabas, a former Rochester city teacher turned local television producer and activist, focused on issues like education, poverty and mass transit, offering innovative ideas as solutions to s ocioeconomic inequality in Rochester. “ Monroe County used to be a leader in progressive, revolutionary move- ments,” said Barnabas. “I’m running because I want to see Rochester return to its radical roots.” On questions regarding poverty and day care, Frankel promised to increase day care subsidies by using funds cut from “unnecessary” county programs. She proposed aplan to train people for s killed jobs through Monroe Community College and forgive loans after five years of work in an area of need. Barnabas proposed a countywide school system, which could solve what he called “educa- t ional apartheid” that’s contributing to poverty in R ochester. Programs involved in the fight against poverty should undergo analysis to see if they’re actually working, said Dinolfo, adding that only programs that are making a clear difference should be funded. The candidates touched on COMIDA’s tax incentives, with Barnabas asserting that neither major party is “capa- b le of distributing funds in a fair way.” Promises made by businesses assisted by the county should be promises kept, said Dinolfo, adding that COMI- DA should double its expectations for job cre- a tion from developers for projects worth more than $ 1million. Frankel argued that COMIDA needs reform because it seems to grant tax abatements to any business that comes through the door, which creates an uneven playing field in Rochester’s business sector. On property taxes, both Dinolfo and Frankel promised to hold taxes flat, with Dinolfo asserting that Frankel raised p roperty taxes by 20 percent during her tenure in Brighton. Frankel attributed that allegation to a fiscal crisis in the town, to which she responded by lowering taxes multiple times while in office. Barnabas said he w anted to abolish property taxes altogether in fa- v or of a local income tax. STADDEO@Gannett . com Debate Continued from Page 3A MIKE BRADLEY Democratic candidate Sandy Frankel, right, speaks during a debate among the three candidates for Monroe County executive Wednesday night in Rochester. Paid for by

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