Democrat and Chronicle from Rochester, New York on October 21, 2015 · Page D8
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October 21, 2015

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Democrat and Chronicle from Rochester, New York · Page D8

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Rochester, New York
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Wednesday, October 21, 2015
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Page8D Wednesday,October21,2015 DemocratandChronicle. com 110s 100s 90s 80s 70s 60s 50s 40s 30s 20s 10s 0s -0s -10s showerst stormscold front rainflurriessnowice warm front stationary front Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. TEMPERATURE PRECIPITATION (in inches) WIND LAKE ONTARIO NATIONAL WEATHER TODAY ALMANAC REGIONAL WEATHER TODAY Rochester Toronto CelsiusCelsiusCelsiusCelsiusCelsius Buffalo Jamestown Montauk White Plains Binghamton Syracuse Albany Poughkeepsie Lake Placid Watertown Potsdam Saratoga Springs Ithaca New York City Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows. ON THE WEB: Click weather at DemocratandChronicle.com ROCHESTER FORECAST NATIONAL CITIES INTERNATIONAL CITIES W -weather, s -sunny, pc -partly cloudy, c -cloudy, sh -showers, t -thunderstorms, r -rain, sf -snow fl urries, sn -snow, i -ice. Hi Lo W Hi Lo W Hi Lo W Hi Lo W Hi Lo W Hi Lo W Hi Lo W Hi Lo W Hi Lo W Hi Lo W Hi Lo W Hi Lo W Hi Lo W Hi Lo W SUN AND MOON THE SUN rise set THE MOON rise set MOON PHASES TODAY Mostly cloudy with a brief shower or two 64° 18° 54° 12° THU A morning shower; mostly cloudy, breezy 63° 17° 38° 3° FRI Partly sunny and cooler 48° 9° 34° 1° SAT Turning cloudy and milder; a p.m. shower 59° 15° 49° 9° SUN Mostly cloudy 59° 15° 40° 4° National Summary: Sunshine and warmth will build over the Southeastern states today. A push of cool air is forecast to contribute to rain from the Great Lakes to part of New England. Downpours will continue to increase in coverage and intensity over the South Central and Southwest states. High/low 68°/55° Normal high/low 58°/40° Record high 79° in 1971 Record low 20° in 1972 Last year high/low 54°/36° An index of energy consumption indicating how many degrees the average temperature was below 65 degrees for the day with negative values counting as zero. LAKE ONTARIO: Wind northeast 6-12 knots. Seas 1-3 feet. A little rain. FINGER LAKES: Mostly cloudy with a shower in places. BUFFALO: Mostly cloudy with a shower in the area. ADIRONDACKS: Spotty showers this afternoon. SYRACUSE: A passing shower or two. ALBANY: Mostly cloudy. NEW YORK CITY: Sunny to partly cloudy, nice and warm. TORONTO: Windy with a couple of showers, mainly early. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2015 Rochester through 5 p.m. Tuesday Level as of 7 a.m. Tue. 244.77 ft. Oct. long-term average 244.78 ft. Deep-water temperature 58° 64/54 59/56 65/56 64/50 67/55 70/49 65/51 64/53 63/49 73/45 49/44 55/49 50/44 59/47 65/50 73/56 24 hours through 5 p.m. Tue. 0.01” Month to date 1.37” Normal month to date 1.78” Year to date 31.57” Normal year to date 27.76” Tuesday 3 Season to date 314 Normal season to date 433 Last season to date 346 HEATING DEGREE DAYS Average16.0 mph Peak gust 23 mph Direction West Today Thu. Today Thu. Today Thu. Today Thu. Today Thu. Today Thu. Today Thu. Albuquerque 63 48 t 63 46 pc Anchorage 45 33 c 41 33 pc Asheville 73 40 s 75 43 s Atlanta 75 55 s 78 56 s Atlantic City 70 56 s 72 54 s Austin 85 69 c 82 64 t Baltimore 72 46 s 75 49 s Billings 64 41 s 66 41 c Birmingham 79 55 s 81 59 s Boise 66 44 s 65 40 pc Boston 60 51 c 69 47 c Brownsville 87 75 c 88 75 t Burlington, VT 53 45 sh 62 38 sh Casper 60 34 c 61 38 sh Charleston, SC 77 58 pc 80 57 pc Charleston, WV 73 46 pc 75 53 s Charlotte, NC 73 42 s 77 47 s Cheyenne 47 37 r 51 39 r Chicago 76 51 c 63 47 s Cincinnati 74 54 s 77 54 pc Cleveland 71 57 pc 65 44 pc Columbia, SC 76 49 s 80 50 s Columbus, OH 72 53 pc 74 47 pc Dallas 83 67 pc 82 68 t Denver 49 37 r 53 39 r Des Moines 74 50 c 67 56 pc Detroit 70 54 sh 67 44 s Fairbanks 34 21 c 31 22 c Fargo 60 32 s 65 45 s Flagstaff 53 33 t 55 33 pc Helena 62 34 s 62 35 s Honolulu 89 77 s 89 76 s Houston 85 70 pc 78 71 t Indianapolis 76 57 pc 75 53 pc Jackson, MS 83 58 s 86 64 s Jacksonville 79 63 pc 80 63 pc Kansas City 77 59 c 76 59 pc Key West 85 78 pc 85 78 pc Las Vegas 78 60 pc 79 60 s Little Rock 81 57 s 84 62 pc Los Angeles 83 62 s 79 59 pc Louisville 78 56 s 81 56 s Memphis 81 57 s 84 63 s Miami 85 75 pc 85 75 sh Midland 76 64 c 76 56 t Milwaukee 72 48 c 62 46 s Minneapolis 65 39 pc 61 44 s Missoula 61 31 s 58 31 pc Nashville 78 49 s 80 52 s Newark 74 52 s 75 50 s New Orleans 80 68 pc 82 70 pc Norfolk 71 54 s 75 55 s Oklahoma City 79 65 pc 75 64 t Omaha 70 50 sh 69 56 c Orlando 83 69 pc 85 68 pc Philadelphia 75 52 s 75 53 s Phoenix 77 63 pc 81 63 s Pittsburgh 70 53 pc 70 42 c Portland, ME 53 42 c 61 39 r Portland, OR 67 49 pc 64 44 pc Providence 68 49 c 71 46 c Raleigh 73 44 s 76 49 s Rapid City 61 37 pc 58 40 r Reno 67 40 s 69 39 pc Richmond 73 45 s 76 51 s Sacramento 84 53 s 84 52 s St. Louis 84 62 s 82 59 pc St. Petersburg 86 71 s 86 71 pc Salt Lake City 65 46 pc 65 48 pc San Antonio 82 72 c 84 71 t San Diego 77 66 s 77 65 pc San Francisco 75 57 s 72 56 pc San Juan, PR 91 78 sh 90 78 pc Santa Fe 58 40 t 60 37 pc Seattle 61 49 pc 58 45 pc Sioux Falls 64 35 s 62 50 sh Spokane 64 43 pc 62 38 pc Tampa 87 70 s 88 69 pc Trenton 74 48 s 74 47 s Tucson 71 53 c 75 53 pc Wash., DC 74 51 s 75 54 s W. Palm Beach 84 75 sh 84 75 sh Wichita 82 63 t 78 62 sh Wilmington, DE 73 47 s 74 48 s Amsterdam 55 52 r 58 47 sh Athens 76 63 t 75 63 t Auckland 63 58 pc 66 58 pc Baghdad 96 72 c 91 67 pc Bangkok 90 77 pc 90 77 t Barbados 87 80 pc 87 80 pc Barcelona 63 51 pc 66 53 s Beijing 53 46 sh 53 42 r Berlin 51 42 c 53 46 sh Bermuda 77 73 pc 78 74 sh Bogota 71 46 c 70 47 t Buenos Aires 73 53 pc 75 49 s Cairo 90 72 s 93 77 pc Calgary 65 41 pc 55 33 pc Cancun 87 77 t 86 77 pc Copenhagen 53 49 c 55 50 sh Dublin 60 48 c 57 43 c Frankfurt 52 43 c 53 43 sh Halifax 51 36 pc 56 49 c Havana 86 71 t 87 71 pc Hong Kong 86 77 s 87 77 pc Istanbul 66 59 t 65 59 r Jerusalem 78 61 s 79 66 pc Johannesburg 82 56 pc 80 54 pc Kabul 69 37 s 69 38 s Kiev 45 38 r 47 37 sh Kinshasa 88 73 t 86 72 t Lima 74 65 pc 74 66 pc Lisbon 74 56 s 73 57 s London 58 52 r 59 42 pc Madrid 66 39 s 67 42 s Manila 87 79 c 87 78 pc Mexico City 76 56 t 70 55 t Montreal 49 39 pc 58 35 r Moscow 37 25 s 39 28 pc Nairobi 81 61 pc 80 61 pc New Delhi 93 66 pc 90 64 s Oslo 53 50 r 58 49 sh Ottawa 49 41 c 59 32 c Paris 56 50 c 58 45 sh Quebec 44 31 pc 50 31 r Rio de Janeiro 95 75 t 87 75 t Rome 67 48 pc 66 48 pc Santiago 69 44 pc 74 50 s Santo Domingo 89 73 t 90 72 t Sao Paulo 93 68 t 90 66 t Seoul 74 53 s 73 55 pc Singapore 91 79 c 91 80 pc Stockholm 50 44 c 54 42 sh Sydney 89 66 t 72 59 sh Tehran 76 55 s 73 56 t Tel Aviv 84 73 s 86 76 pc Tokyo 69 59 pc 71 61 s Toronto 59 56 sh 60 36 pc Vancouver 56 47 c 55 44 pc Vienna 51 41 pc 51 44 s Vilnius 42 35 sh 43 39 pc Warsaw 47 41 r 50 43 pc Winnipeg 53 29 c 52 38 s Zurich 51 36 pc 49 41 sh Today 7:31 a.m. 6:19 p.m. Possible sun 10 hr., 48 min. Thursday 7:32 a.m. 6:17 p.m. Possible sun 10 hr., 45 min. Today 2:49 p.m. 12:23 a.m. Thursday 3:29 p.m. 1:28 a.m. FullLastNewFirst Nov 19Nov 11Nov 3Oct 27 tracetrace 0.00.00.0 Month to date Normal M-T-D Season to date Normal S-T-D Rochester season to date Trace Buffalo season to date Trace Syracuse season to date 0.4” SNOWFALL (in inches) Rochester through 5 p.m. Tue. Tue. )94&"4+7$57#07"4246' 37!<:%,4:$<!-87; (/(.1/1.*((( (%#" & *' ! "+ )%#"'$ democratandchronicle.com/insider Ifyouhavea subscription,then you’reanInsider! Log-inandstart takingadvantageof yourInsiderperks today! The Colts’ attempt to fool the Patriots with a fake punt Sunday night only made I ndianapolis look foolish. It might not have been the dumbest call or execution of a play in NFL history, but it certainly ranks down there in the litany of failures. And there are many to rival this one, in which Indy, trailing by six points in the t hird quarter, lined up nine players to the r ight, with only the snapper (wideout Griff Whalen) and the quarterback (safety Colt Anderson) on the left. N ew England wasn’t tricked a bit, and the Colts’ plan was supposed to include taking a delay of game. Instead, Anders on took a premature snap and was at the bottom of a tidal wave of Patriots tacklers. G ame over, basically. “The whole idea there was on fourth- a nd-3 or less, shift our alignment to where you either catch them misaligned, they try to sub some people in, catch t hem with 12 men on the field, and if you get a certain look, you can make a play,” coach Chuck Pagano said. “Alignment- w ise, we weren’t lined up correctly, and then there was a communication prob- l em on the snap, and I take responsibility for that.” Who gets the blame on some of the other classic Bozo plays in NFL annals? Read on: Abner Haynes — The star running b ack for the AFL’s Dallas Texans in 1962 misunderstood coach Hank Stram’s directions on the coin flip for overtime. He w on and chose to kick off into a hefty wind. Fortunately for Haynes, the Texans (now the Kansas City Chiefs) held off t he Oilers and won in double OT. Jim Marshall — One of the most dura- b le players in NFL history, the defensive end is best known for going the wrong way with a fumble. The Vikings standout r ecovered a fumble by the 49ers’ Billy Kilmer and, disoriented, returned it 66 yards to his own end zone. Safety, San F rancisco. Garo Yepremian — Perhaps the most i nfamous play in a Super Bowl, Dolphins kicker Garo Yepremian had his attempt blocked by Washington in 1973. He picked up the ball, made a clumsy attempt to pass, and it flew directly to the Redskins’ Mike Bass. He went 49 yards f or a TD, but Miami held on to close out its perfect season. J oe Pisarcik, John McVay, Bob Gibson — The “Miracle at the Meadowlands,” when Giants QB Joe Pisarcik followed the orders of coach John McVay a nd offensive coordinator Bob Gibson to hand off to future Hall of Fame fullback Larry Csonka when kneeling would have c linched a victory over Philadelphia. Pisarcik’s attempt never got to Csonka, hit the turf and Eagles DB Herman Edwards picked up the ball and ran into the end zone for the winning points. Leon Lett — Late in Dallas’ 1993 Super Bowl rout of Buffalo, Cowboys DL L eon Lett picked up a fumble and headed d own the right sideline undisturbed. As he approached the goal line, he began showboating, sticking the ball out front. B ills receiver Don Beebe caught him and knocked the ball out of Lett’s hands for a touchback. L eon Lett (again) — This time, Miami was trying a field goal in the snow in Dallas on Thanksgiving Day — seriously. T he kick was blocked and sat on the white stuff untouched. Until Lett, des pite claiming he knew the rules that it was a dead ball if no one touched it, tried to pounce on the pigskin. It slid away, the D olphins recovered and kicked the winning field goal. Lett called it “brain freeze.” D an Orlovsky — In the midst of the NFL’s only 0-16 season, the Lions QB o bliviously stepped out of the back of the end zone while scrambling, awarding the Vikings a safety. Mark Sanchez — New England could give thanks to Jets QB Mark Sanchez on Thanksgiving night when his running b ack missed a handoff, so Sanchez took off and smacked into the butt of guard B randon Moore. Out came the ball, scooped up by Patriots DB Steve Gregory, who trotted into the end zone for a touchdown. D wayne Rudd — Cleveland linebacker Dwayne Rudd blew his top and cost the Browns a win. Rudd was penalized f or ripping off his helmet and flinging it in celebration during the final seconds against Kansas City. That extended the opening game in 2002, and the Chiefs won. Jim Schwartz — What is it about Thanksgiving? Jim Schwartz threw his r ed flag on a play that already would be r eviewed, Justin Forsett’s 81-yard TD run for Houston. But because the Lions coach challenged — considered a delay o f the next snap by league rules — the replay official couldn’t initiate a review. What should have been an 8-yard rush b ecause Forsett was down by conduct turned into a touchdown. Detroit lost in overtime. D arius Reynaud — The Titans opened the 2013 season at Pittsburgh in f ine fashion. Darius Reynaud botched handling the opening kickoff outside the end zone, and stepped back over the goal l ine to down the ball. Two points for the Steelers. Pete Carroll, Darrell Bevell — A “ Beast” of a botched play. With perhaps the best short-yardage back in football, M arshawn Lynch, on the field, the Sea- hawks threw on second down from the Patriots 1. The ball was intercepted to clinch New England’s victory. In the Super Bowl. Did we say dumb? NFL Fake punt by Colts didn’t fool Pats Another in a long list of dumb plays in NFL history BARRY WILNER ASSOCIATED PRESS AP Cowboys Leon Lett celebrates as he heads for the goal line after recovering a Bills fumble during Super Bowl XXVII . Bills' Don Beebe, l eft, stripped the ball from Lett. DES MOINES, Iowa - Iowa coach Kirk F erentz banned his players from Twitter once he realized the potential pitfalls of s ocial media. Some of his Big Ten colleagues might start thinking that Ferentz is on to some- t hing. T he downside to social media again became apparent last weekend. Michi- g an athletic director Jim Hackett re- l eased an open letter on Sunday urging fans to avoid “thoughtless comments” following Michigan State’s last-play 2723 win over the Wolverines. M uch of negative online chatter focused on Michigan punter Blake O’Neill, w hose fumble led to the game-winning touchdown for the Spartans. “It’s very disappointing. But it’s the w orld we’re living in right now, too. Peo- p le tend to attack other people via social media,” Spartans coach Mark Dantonio s aid. “It’s just one play. It should not de- f ine a person.” Unlike Ferentz, most Big Ten coaches have accepted social media as a fact of life for themselves and their players. N orthwestern coach Pat Fitzgerald is one of the more active Big Ten coaches o n Twitter. Fitzgerald said he uses social media to “spread the good news” about the Wildcats and interact with fans. Fitzg erald said dealing with “trolls” is part o f his job. But Fitzgerald had some strong word f or what he dubbed “haters” who took to t heir computers and phones to bash O’Neill. “I feel sorry for those people. I really do,” Fitzgerald said. “Every young man i s trying to go out there and make a play and do what’s right. When that doesn’t go r ight, nobody feels worse than that young person. As a coach, that’s where you try and step in and give them every- t hing you can and try to be supportive of t hem.” COLLEGE FOOTBALL Big Ten coaches irked by online attacks against punter LUKE MEREDITH ASSOCIATED PRESS WEATHER/SPORTS

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