Democrat and Chronicle from Rochester, New York on October 18, 2015 · Page E5
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October 18, 2015

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Democrat and Chronicle from Rochester, New York · Page E5

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Sunday, October 18, 2015
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DemocratandChronicle .com Sunday,October18,2015 Page5E Sometimes in business, it’s about who you know. Katiuscia Baldwin put her networking skills to use earlier this year while shopping for a new location for Envision Graphics. “I got lucky because my new landlord had been one of my customers. That’s how I really found out about it, just asking around,” said shop owner Baldwin, 38. “I was definitely nervous about making the move from East Rochester, but I knew having this bay was crucial.” The 50-foot heated garage bay in the new space in Brighton allows the five- p erson, all-woman team to work on vehicle graphics and wraps all year long, something that wasn’t possible at the previous location. The bay also makes it possible for Baldwin to go after a 3M certification for her shop. A lot of the vinyl materials used at Envision Graphics are products of 3M, and after training and testing, Envision Graphics will hopefully be certified installers. The training will happen later this winter. “If I’m able to get it, I’ll be the first woman to be 3M certified in New York State,” says Baldwin, an Ontario resident. We spoke with the owner recently about girl power, competing with Staples and more. O n obtaining her WBE (Woman B usiness Enterprise) certification in May: “This will allow me to bid on certain New York State projects where government funding is involved. A lot of government-funded projects require a certain percentage to go to a woman- owned business or a minority-owned business. So it’s definitely given me a lot more opportunities to bid on larger projects across the state.” On being the small fry: “Attaining new customers is always difficult. I try to do different things, add on new services or try a different type of advertising. Competing with online businesses has made things a little difficult, with Staples, Vistaprint and Office Max offering signs and banners. We always try to put forth our quality and the fact that we’re a local business. You can actually talk to us! It’s always harder when you’re asmall business trying to compete with someone like Staples.” O n new services: “We've really started to offer more photography services recently. Not just for businesses, but for the person looking for holiday portraits or a unique photo shoot. That’s still under works. We’re fine-tuning that before we really launch for the holidays this year.” On her background and influences: “I’m a fine artist. I’ve been a painter ever since I can remember. I went to Cazenovia College and majored in commercial illustration. … My whole team has a creative background. We try our best to incorporate it in all of our projects we work on. We specifically use Adobe Creative Suite or Illustrator or Photoshop to put together a lot of our designs, and then we print everything on our large-format printer.” O n girl power: “My biggest recent success was definitely getting the WBE certification. I’m very excited to be able to have that, especially in our field. The sign and graphic industry is male-dominated. I’m definitely out there to promote girl power and try to do whatever I can to be at the top or to be the first female to do something in this industry.” For more information: Envision Graphics, Inc., 2340 Brighton-Henrietta Town LineRoad, Brighton. Call (585) 3816800 or go to www.envisiondgp.com. Catching up with Katiuscia Baldwin Envision Graphics thinks big and gains momentum Jinelle Shengulette REBECCA PHILLIPS Katiuscia Baldwin STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST Ametek AME 45.12 57.67 -3.4 2.8 +14.9 20.5 21 0.7 Bank America BAC 14.60 18.48 3.5 -9.9 +1.5 6.6 12 1.2 CIBER CBR 2.84 4.21 3.5 -0.8 +3.5 0.9 ... ... CmtyBS CBU 33.03 40.50 0.7 1.7 +14.9 13.7 17 3.2 Constellation Br A 80.70 138.67 -1.3 37.6 +65.3 48.1 28 0.9 Cooper COO 136.75 190.00 4.9 -11.0 —2.4 23.4 36 ... Corning 15.42 25.16 -3.6 -26.3 —0.9 -0.2 10 2.8 Document DSS 0.15 0.83 10.9 -52.4 —72.6 -42.8 ... ... Dr DPS 60.65 84.30 0.5 17.4 +39.0 21.2 22 2.3 Eastman Chem EMN 62.84 88.93 -2.5 -9.0 —5.0 13.9 14 2.3 Eastman KODK 13.25 23.82 1.0 -24.0 —7.3 ... ... ... Ecolab ECL 97.78 121.89 1.3 16.8 +17.1 19.5 30 1.1 EnPro 38.08 70.23 -4.7 -28.3 —23.6 6.1 ... 1.8 Exelon Corp EXC 28.41 38.93 -1.2 -17.9 —7.0 -2.1 11 4.1 ExxonMobil 66.55 97.20 4.1 -10.8 —5.8 7.7 15 3.5 Financial Inst. FISI 21.67 27.02 1.3 1.0 +7.7 10.2 11 3.1 First Fin FNFG 7.00 10.82 1.4 25.4 +34.0 1.7 ... 3.0 Ford F 10.44 16.74 2.1 -1.4 +13.4 4.1 17 3.9 Frontier Comm FTR 4.19 8.46 0.8 -21.7 —7.5 -2.1 ... 8.0 Co GCI 10.75 16.00 -0.5 5.5 -999.0 ... ... 4.3 Electric GE 19.37 28.68 3.2 14.7 +23.3 15.0 ... 3.2 Co 24.62 38.99 0.6 -5.0 +15.1 12.6a 12 4.3 57.29 105.49 -5.5 -28.5 —27.1 7.5 14 ... Corp 15.71 34.65 -2.1 -37.5 —41.1 2.2 12 1.8 HSBC HSBC 36.78 51.20 -0.5 -14.5 —13.5 -0.3 ... 6.2 60.78 84.78 1.1 6.6 +24.6 13.6 23 2.6 IEC Electronics IEC 3.15 5.60 -2.9 -28.4 —26.1 -8.3 ... ... IDEX Corp IEX 65.45 80.31 -3.2 -3.7 +10.6 16.9 21 1.7 IBM IBM 140.56 186.65 -1.3 -6.3 —13.7 3.7 12 3.5 JPMorgCh 50.07 70.61 0.8 0.4 +16.4 13.2 11 2.8 & 81.79 109.49 3.0 -6.1 +4.5 11.8 18 3.1 KEY 11.55 15.70 1.1 -5.0 +10.7 12.0 12 2.3 L-3 Communications 101.11 132.92 -2.9 -12.6 +3.4 12.2 16 2.4 3 Commun 37.61 57.08 5.3 -4.1 +18.8 29.1 54 ... M&T Bank MTB 111.50 134.00 -2.2 -6.9 +3.1 11.7 16 2.4 & 7.01 16.52 -6.5 -42.5 —44.6 -6.7a 7 8.1 MDLZ 31.83 48.58 1.9 26.2 +44.8 19.2 36 1.5 46.93 71.45 0.3 21.8 +41.3 17.0 36 0.9 93.47 133.41 -4.9 -22.0 -1.9 9.1 14 2.5 A 41.59 51.72 0.3 8.8 +20.2 15.6 26 3.3 Corp 6.74 10.76 -2.0 -32.0 —20.4 16.2 14 ... Corp SPXC 11.02 26.01 -6.7 -46.2 —40.9 0.1 8 ... Foods SENEB 30.40 43.85 -0.7 -0.5 +4.9 5.1 35 ... 21.57 32.59 -2.3 -10.2 —19.5 13.3 ... ... STC 27.31 43.02 0.0 14.7 +47.3 30.4 26 2.4 Corp 35.45 41.87 1.2 4.4 +17.7 10.0 26 2.9 TGNA 20.75 33.40 -2.9 -0.3 +19.9 22.8 5 2.2 Fisher 107.33 141.25 -0.1 0.9 +15.8 21.4 26 0.5 Corp (The) 34.88 42.64 0.3 3.0 +20.8 4.6 16 3.2 Cable TWC 128.78 194.22 0.7 24.1 +45.9 29.0 27 1.6 Financial 44.07 57.18 -0.8 -2.0 +17.7 8.7 14 3.1 8.56 10.55 7.8 -2.3 +7.2 7.8 17 ... ULBI 2.83 6.39 14.5 93.0 +104.8 4.9 ... ... 111.41 263.81 0.9 24.1 +49.8 46.2 73 ... Comm 38.06 51.73 1.2 -4.4 —1.6 11.2 19 5.1 VSCP 1.73 4.36 4.1 -36.0 —51.9 -26.5 ... ... Corp 2.65 7.60 -1.9 19.3 +89.8 -8.8 ... ... 4.42 16.62 3.6 -46.8 —35.2 11.5 ... 8.8 9.45 14.36 -3.3 -26.4 —15.8 0.4 19 2.7 data: returns, 1-year , price. ree-year five-year annualized. Ellipses available. Price-earnings closed-end quarters. U.S.-listed shares, 20 (far-left box) 20 (far-right box). $CHG %CHG %CHG %RTN %RTN October is National Bullying P revention Awareness Month. Have you been bullied in the workplace? Or have you bullied someone else by intimidation, humiliation, threatening, work interference or verbally abusing them? I t is useful to realize that b ullying has nothing whatsoever to do with the person being bullied. It is all about the bully a nd he/she will usually keep it up as long as the “victim” reacts to it. When we realize the a ttacks aren’t personal and don’t say anything about us, we stop reacting emotionally and t he bully usually stops. Bullies interfere with, t hreaten or humiliate another person. The 2014 Workplace Bullying Institute’s, US Work- p lace Bullying Surveyattribut- ed bullying to the fact that the “perpetrators’ need to control t argeted individual(s).” This is so they can feel in control of t hemselves and in workplace situations. The survey goes on to say “(Bullying) undermines legitimate business interests, when bullies’ personal agendas take precedence over work itself. T he behavior may be severe enough to affect a targeted worker’s health, jeopardize his/her job, and strain his/her relationships with family and friends. It has nothing to do with the work itself.” When my two sons were in elementary school there was a bully at their bus stop. One winter morning, “Bullie” grabbed Eric’s hat and held it u ptoo high for Eric to reach. Eric kept telling “Bullie” to g ive it back, he was cold, it was his hat. “Bullie” threw it in the air, hid it behind his back, etc. u ntil the bus came. Eric was still upset when he boarded the school bus. Another morning, “Bullie” grabbed my other son’s, Jared, hat and went through the same keep-away antics. Jared didn’t p ay any attention to “Bullie” or h is hat. In less than a minute “Bullie” handed Jared his hat back. W e are responsible for how we feel, act, or react. We have the ability to decide how we w ant to feel and act. Not reacting to bullies may seem like we are at their mercy, but when t hey attack, it is for a desired reaction. When we stay com- f ortable within ourselves, we can know that whatever the bullies are saying and doing d oesn’t say anything about us, only about the bully. When we stop believing we a re less important because someone says we are, we are in t he drivers’ seat of our lives and of our workplace experience. We did not cause the bullying to happen and we have the power to believe in ourselves and our abilities. WBI suggests n aming bullying for what it is. I believe this is empowering, as long as we “name it” without anger, fearand stress. Remember, it is not personal — bullying is about the bully, period. However, the way we react is about us. We have choices about how we are going to feel. Feeling angry, fearful, and stressed won’t stop the bully. (It may encourage him/her to continue.) D on’t put some bully in charge of your happiness. Dec ide to be comfortable knowing you are the only authority on you. Nextpert Jackie McCullough Are you bullied in the workplace? This Week’s Nextpert Jackie McCullough is a life coach/counselor, teaching and counseling people about “Life Options” and author of You’re Not Lost to Me. Follow Jackie’s blog @JoyChoice.net. Interested in being a Nextpert? Email: RocNext@Democratand Chronicle.com . market,” said Johnson. “Our grid has been equated to the grid of a third-world country, with the number of power outages we have had as compared to other developed countries like in Europe,” Johnson said. John S. Lapp founded the company in 1 916 after partnering with Fred Locke on w hat is known as Victor Insulators, an O ntario County firm specializing in porcelain insulators. It was Locke who invented porcelain insulators. “The Rochester area has always been big in this sector of the market and successful, but it is not one that’s talked about (as being) nearly as exciting as photonics and solar, probably,” Johnson said. The emergence of new technologies a nd materials — products such as plas- t ic, fiberglass rods and silicon rubber — h ave transformed the market, which is s till growing, said Ira Knickerbocker, CEO of Victor Insulators. “The use of electric insulators is actually still growing,” Knickerbocker said. “The use of porcelain insulators is growing primarily in the substation area. Lapp is very strong in that; we are also very active in that. But a lot of the g rowth is being filled with imports.” Competition nearly forced Victor Insulators to close its 280,000-square-foot plant and lay off about 90 workers. Today, just Victor Insulators, Lapp In- s ulators and Baltimore-based NGK Locke Inc. supply porcelain insulators. All three trace their roots back to Fred Locke, Knickerbocker said. Meanwhile, Lapp survived through a s eries of strategic moves that saw own- e rship change a few times, starting in 1 999, when a management-led team b ought the company and later acquired the $30 million insulator business of ceramic components maker CeramTec. That team then sold 75 percent of the company to New York City-based private equity firm Andlinger & Co., which allowed Lapp to grow further after buying plants in Germany, Poland and Romania to grow sales outside of the U.S. “We knew we had to continue to grow t hrough a tough five-year period,” said J ohnson, referring to the beginning of t he millennium. “We needed to raise capital.” German private equity firm Quadriga Capital bought Lapp and moved the firm’s headquarters to Wunsiedel, Germany, before it finalized the deal with Pfisterer earlier this month. Lapp does about $150 million in global revenue, about 25 percent in the U.S. It employs about 1,200 workers globally. “ We’ve done a nice job to sustain the e mployment level, grow the business by a dding more value to the customers, and w e see that strategy as being a good, profitable one for the company and helping to stabilize the employment base in Genesee County,” Johnson said. “I feel really good about it for our employees and customers because it is more of a long-term stable structure.” TCLAUSEN@Gannett.com Lapp Continued from Page 3E JAY CAPERS STAFF PHOTOGRAPHERFILE PHOTO Walt Walradt, of Le Roy, a glaze operator at Lapp Insulators in Le Roy applies the glaze to a station post insulator before firing.

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