The Palm Beach Post from West Palm Beach, Florida on November 6, 1968 · Page 2
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November 6, 1968

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The Palm Beach Post from West Palm Beach, Florida · Page 2

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West Palm Beach, Florida
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Wednesday, November 6, 1968
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2 Palm Beach Post, Wed., November 6, 1968 Revised Constitution Wins Voter Approval Early election results Indicated Florida has a new Constitution. By margins above ten per cent, Florida voters apparently passed all three revision sections and gave the 1S85 Florida Constitution the boot. In Palm Beach County the early margin was five to two in favor of the new document but many voters seemed to disregard the proposition. When 15,000 votes were tallied here only about 5,000 had acknowledged that section of the ballot by voting either yes or no, for each of the three sections. State wide approval flowed from Florida's population centers. Dade County gave the new charter a 30,000 vote margin with more than two-thirds of Its precincts tallied. Broward County gave the new paper a 3-1 early margin. Populous Duval, Hillsborough, Brevard and Pinellas Counties also gave strong backing. The thrice vote was called for by state legislators who expected Articles VI and VIII to be more controversial than the basic document. The first vote called for approval of the basic document excluding the named articles. Article VI dealt with suffrage and elections and was Initially expected to Include a provision calling for an 18-year-old voting age. The new constitution did not contain reference to a lowered voting age and Article VI Is basically the same as its 1885 counterpart. Article VIII dealt with local government and either broadens or lessens local powers, according to the Interpreters viewpoint. The article does give additional powers to county governments. Counties may tax up to 20-mllls while cities are limited to 10-mills. Counties are also provided with an option to charter and function with all the powers of a municipality. The charter by option will determine whether municipal or county laws are supreme In cases of conflict. The new charter retained and strengthened the elected cabinet and expanded homestead exemption to Increase It from $5,000 to $10,000 for persons permanently disabled or over 65. A ban on state Income tax was retained. An entirely new section was included which declared that it be state policy to "conserve and protect Its natural resources and scenic beauty" and require the passage of laws to guard Florida against air and water pollution. The Florida League of Municipalities with but two exceptions (Jacksonville and Mac- Clenny) did not back the new constitution. Some argued the document was not clear In several areas and subject to varied Interpretations. Other groups opposed were the state National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. The Committee for Integrity In Government, headed by State Rep. George Stallings of Jacksonville, three University of Florida Political Science professors, and five former state cabinet officers. For the document were the Florida Bar Association, The Florida League of Women Voters, The Florida Farm Bureau, The Florida Constitutional Revision Commission and Most of the State's major newspapers. Those for the revised document, Including a contested Florida Bar Association approval, stressed the brevity of the newer paper 25,000 words Instead of the 40,000 words Including 150 amendments the 1885 document contained. The new constitution also provides for amendment by petition of voters where the old document could only be amended by legislative act. The voter approved revision was not the first revision attempt In Florida. At least one earlier try was killed by the State Supreme Court. The present revision began In 1965 under Gov. Haydon Bums and continued through present Gov. Claude Kirk's term, when it was finally approved by the legislature In a special legislative session called In 1967. Court Clerk Dunkle Runs Well Ahead Reid Ahead of Maxwell With Vote Half Counted GOP Harrison Ahead In Magistrate Race of Florida, Reid, 35, Is currently serving as president of the Lake Worth Junior High School Parent-Teacher Association. Maxwell, 44, seeking his third term as tax assessor is former manager of the West Palm Beach building materials plant of R.H. Wright, Inc., a division of Houdaille David L. Rei y m ' . "L Incumbent Palm Beach County Circuit Court Clerk John B. Dunkle, with 70 out of the county's' 114 precincts reporting, was running more than 3,000 votes ahead of his Republican opponent, Alfred Furtado Jr. late Tuesday night. Unofficial returns showed Dunkle with 26,464 votes to Furtado's 23,261. Dunkle, 40, previously served as clerk of the county Criminal Court for more than five years before his election to his present post In 1964. Furtado is personnel Investigator for the sheriff's Douglas had 11,215 votes to Brophy's 8,252. Judge Douglas has held his office since 1960, while Brophy Is presently the attorney for the Town of Lantana. In the only other Magistrate Court office, criminal division Incumbent Judge Donald P. Kohl, Republican of Palm Springs, retained his post unopposed. Judge Kohl, appointed in 1965, was also unopposed In the May 7 primary. Tuesday night, with 48 precincts reporting, Kohl had complied 9,826 votes. ney Allan V. Everard, Democrat of North Palm Beach. Stewart had 11,820 votes to Everard's 6,714. Judge Stewart was appointed to his present office in 1965, while Everard Is presently the municipal judge for South Bay and city prosecutor for Riviera Beach. In the other county judgeship race, incumbent Paul Douglas, Democrat of West Palm Beach, took a commanding lead over his Republican opponent, Gilbert Bro-phy, Republican of West Palm Beach. McGehee In Lead For Tax Collector Judge Mcintosh Appears Winner Russell H. Mcintosh John Born Leads Race For Judge Newcomer John E. Born, Democrat of West Palm Beach, appeared headed for victory as Judge of the Juvenile and Domestic Relations Court Tuesday night with a 3,149 vote lead over his Republican opponent, Incumbent Judge Lewis Kapner. With 70 of 114 precincts reporting, Born had 30,302 votes to Kapner's 27,153. Kapner of Lake Park was first appointed to the judgeship in 1967. John E. Born Winner Dies BRAZIL, Ind. (UPI) An unopposed candidate who was certain of election died Tuesday of natural causes 30 minutes before the polling places opened. David M. Anderson, Brazil, unopposed Democratic Nominee for Clay County treasurer, died Tuesday morning. His death created a problem for local officials since Anderson was certain to be elected. Most likely procedure was for the county commissioners, once they are elected and sworn into office, to name a successor to Anderson. tin Republican David L. Reid, with a little less than half of Palm Beach County's precincts reporting, led Democrat Edgar W. Maxwell, by nearly 2,860 votes, in the race for the post Maxwell now holds County Tax Assessor. Reid, who served as tax collector for the municipalities of Atlantis and Palm Springs, had 11,661 votes cast for him compared to Maxwell's 8,803. A graduate of the University Burns' Lead Indicates Victory RIVIERA BEACH Democrat Billy B. Burns seemed sure of retaining his seat on the Port of Palm Beach Commission late Tuesday night when the reporting precincts showed him to lead Kenneth Ganaway, R-West Palm Beach, 3,033 votes to 1,419. Burns, entering his fifth term as port commissioner from Sub-District 2, Group 2, will be joined on the commission by two new members. John C. Cassidy, unopposed Republican for the Sub-District 1 seat, will serve with Bums, taking the place of Markham Langham, who retires from the commission in January. In the third race, for the seat of retiring commissioner, Gleason Stambaugh, Democrat Lee K. Spencer showed a substantial lead over Republican Scott L. French late Tuesday night. Spencer had polled 2,890 votes to French's 1,492. Burns, contacted Tuesday evening, pledged to continue "diligent and progesslve efforts to make Peanut Island and Palm Beach County the finest oceanographlc center in the world." "I want to thank everyone who voted for me today," Bums continued, "and I particularly thank those who worked so hard during my campaign." Bums, a resident of West Palm Beach, is president of the Bums and Co. realty firm and past president of the Florida Ports Association. GCI Escapees Are Sought Area law enforcement officers continued to be on the alert Tuesday night for two Glades Correctional Institute prisoners who walked away from an Alcoholic Anonymous dinner In West Palm Beach. Sought are Jimmy L. Black, 27, of West Palm Beach, and George Dunlevy, 29, address unknown. The pair was among a group of prisoners who were given the privilege of attending the AA meeting. They fled the meeting at the American Legion Home, 625 Okeechobee Road, minutes before the meeting was adjourned. Balck was serving a nine-year sentence, five years for a previous escape and four years for forgery. Dunlevy was convicted of breaking and entering. Mrs. Wymer, who is a part-time teacher at Palm Beach County Day School, Is the wife of John Wymer, administrator of Good Samaritan Hospital. She holds a degree in law from Temple College of Law and In 1967 obtained her master's degree In education from Florida Atlantic University. A graduate of the University of Florida Law School, Jones Is a practicing attorney in Belle Glade and an assistant county solicitor. Early, who won the Republican nomination In the primary election from Paul Glynn, was named to the office when the Incumbent, Robert W. Fulton, resigned, effective Sept. 1. He was formerly administrative assistant at S.D. Spady Elementary School and before that a social studies teacher at Palm Beach High School for 10 years. Republican Howard Harrison of West Palm Beach took an early lead In Tuesday night voting, Indicating a victory as newly elected judge to the Palm Beach County Magistrate Court, criminal division. At the same time, incumbent Judge F. A. Currie, Democrat of West Palm Beach, took a slight lead over his Republican opponent, William Staab of West Palm Beach, for re-election as judge of the Magistrate Court, civil division. With 48 of 114 precincts reporting, Harrison had compiled 10,275 votes to his opponent, Democrat Robert V. Parker's 7.659 votes. Both men were running for the office for the first time, the post having been vacated by Judge William Carter White, who was running for election to the criminal court. Harrison, running for the Group 3 office, has been an assistant county solicitor since 1965 and was appointed municipal judge of North Palm Beach in 1967. Parker is a practicing West Palm Beach attorney. In the other Magistrate Court race, Judge Currie had 9,860 votes to Staab's 9,115 votes. Judge Currie has held his Group 1 post since 1951, while it was th first time Staab had run for elective office. He Is presently an assistant county solicitor. In the races for the county Judge's offices, two incumbents appeared headed for victory with 48 precincts reporting. Judge James R. Stewart, Republican of West Palm Beach, had a commanding lead over his opponent, attor- Rogers Continued From Page 1 and former assistant Palm Beach County solicitor, was an out-and-out supporter of Richard M. Nixon as the presidential candidate. Rogers repeatedly said that if the House of Representatives has to decide who will be the next president, Nixon, Hubert Humphrey or George Wallace, the third party candidate, he would vote for the one who got the majority In his congressional district. Rogers stressed during the campaign that he had, after seven terms and 14 years in the U.S. House of Representatives, "seniority." This, he explained, meant he would receive important committee assignments and "thus, I will be able to serve my district better." Rogers never disavowed Humphrey nor did he come out openly for him during the campaign. Instead, he pointed to his own voting record and said, "The people in my district know how I stand on every Issue." Rogers is an Important member of two House committees, Interstate and Foreign Commerce, and Merchant Marine and Fisheries. While Rogers' primary assignment is on the first committee, he said the work he does on the second may eventually be more Important to the future of Florida. The latter committee, he said, deals with oceanography and this science will soon be more Important to Florida, in expenditures for scientific manpower, for equipment and for research, than space exploration has been. Friday, Th omas Continued From Page 1 board of four commercial banks. He and his wife, Jeanne, and five children live on Beach Road inTequesta. Thomas served on seven committees In the 1967 session and was active in legislation to provide emergency treatment for the mentally 111. In the last session he won the Governor's Conservation Award for the Introduction and passage In the Senate of the Submerged Land Act which requires biological and ecological surveys before can be granted for filling such lands and for setting bulkhead lines. John Dunkle Beasley Takes Early Vote Lead Horace Beasley, the Democratic Incumbent, went into an unofficial lead for the office of supervisor of elections late Tuesday night as totals for 50 of the county's 114 precincts were announced. Unofficial totals gave Beasley 16,056 votes against 13,654 for his Republican opponent, Robert D. Clark. Even with what appeared to be a growing lead, Beasley Horace Beasley was unwilling to predict victory, however. "The absentee votes are going to decide this election," the supervisor said about 10:30 p.m. About 6,300 absentee ballots were received before the 5 p.m. Monday deadline. Counting will start today. Throughout most of the early evening, Clark had a slight edge In the totals and a cheer went up from Beasley supporters in the election headquarters when chalkboard totals first showed Beasley ahead. Beasley, who lives at 737 W. Hummingbird Way, North Palm Beach, has lived in Florida for 40 years, 24 of them in Palm Beach County. Clark was a captain in the West Palm Beach Police Department before his retirement in 1964 after 16 years on the force. Venezuela Voles CARACAS, Venezuela (UPI) An estimated 16,000 Americans living in Venezuela cast absentee ballots In Tuesday's U.S. presidential election, the American Embassy reported Tuesday. They Will Envy Us In Alaska The Seventh Annual Fun'n'-Sun Edition will be published by The Post-Times next Sunday and will start Its Journey around the world. Among those on the mailing list Is Mr. Robert L. Hart man of Anchorage, Alaska. Mr. Hartman will get his copy through the courtesy ol a local resident who has ordered the Fun'n'Sun sent to him. Everyone who reads the Fun'n'Sun will be Impressed and enjoy the special edition about the Palm Beaches. But Mr. Hartman will probably be even more Impressed than most. The temperature yesterday in Juneau was 25 and 32 degrees. And Anchorage is even closer to the Arctic Circle. Each year hundreds of local residents send the Fun'n'Sun to friends and relatives throughout the United States and around the world. The Post-Times makes It easy for you. Simply use the coupon ads which appear regularly in the paper. Single copy cost mailed anywhere within the continental VS. Is 35 cents. Multiple orders Is at reduced rate. Or, we'll mall copies anywhere In the world for 50 cents each. All mall editions of the Fun'n'Sun are delivered In a full-color wrapper. But don't delay. Sunday (Nov. 10) Is Fun'n'Sun Day. Colbath Seen Victor Over Witt With 48 precincts reporting slightly less than half Walter N. Colbath Jr., 33, a Republican, was the apparent winner for the office of Public Defender of Palm Beach County. Colbath, the incumbent, led John S. Witt bv a margin of 13,5.18 to 7,442. One of Colbath's heaviest winning preclnts was the 48th, where he defeated Witt by a margin of 1,070 to 383; also the 127th, where Colbath drew 960 votes to Witt's 497. Colbath was elected to his post in 1966 to complete the term left vacant by the resignation of Clyde Windham. Colbath, a Navy veteran and a graduate of the University of Indiana and the Unlveristy of Miami Law School, lives at 501 Gulf Road, North Palm Beach, with his wife and two children. Witt, 40, is an assistant county solicitor, who lives in West Palm Beach. Walter Colbath Jr. Glimey Continued From Page 1 job was to help local communities adjust to Civil Rights Act. Gurney often during the campaign called Collins the first "Civil Rights director." Never once during the strenuous campaign did Gurney reveal how difficult it was at times for him to make lengthy hand shaking tours. The former mayor of Winter Park was severely wounded during World War II, a German sniper's bullet lodging next to his spine, and often it was hard for him to walk. During his visit to Palm Beach County last week, Gurney toured four plants here: International Business Machines at Boca Raton; Pratt & Whitney In the western part of the county; International Telephone & Telegraph in West Palm Beach and Solltron Devices, Inc., In Riviera Beach. As the day wore on, It was obvious that Gurney was tiring since his limp became more and more obvious. About the only time during the campaign Gurney became upset was in Palm Beach County. An engineer at ITT asked if there was any "basis for Collins' constant accusation that Gurney had a poor attendance record in the U.S. House of Representatives. Gurney hurriedly called a press conference where he described his overall attendance record in the U.S. House of Representatives as "a damn, good one." Gurney's campaign theme was actually a simple one: He is against big f-overnment and he said Washington, D.C., should return more and more control of government programs to state and local governments. His stand on the war in Vietnam was also quite clear-cut: Either use all the U.S. man-'power and weaponry there to win the war quickly or else, if this would prove too costly In lives and equipment, get out of Vietnam. Asst. County Tax Collector C. E. McGehee, Republican candidate to succeed retiring Stetson O. Sproul as tax collector, was leading challenging Democrat Daniel A. Doherty by nearly a 2-to-l ratio unofficial returns from 48 of the county's 114 precincts showed late Tuesday. McGehee, 42, Is originally from Atlanta Ga., and was formerly with the Georgia Highway Patrol as well as being assistant fire marshal for the DeKalb County, Ga. Fire Department. Doherty, 45, a licensed mortgage broker In Delray Beach is a former chief inspector at the Paint Beach Kennel Club. Mounts Triumphs Palm Beach County Solicitor Marvin U. Mounts Jr. Democrat of West Palm Beach, retained his office In Tuesday night's running unopposed. He had, however, received 6,898 votes with 48 of the city's 114 precincts reporting. It will be Mount's second term In office, having been elected In 1964 with a Democratic Primary victory over attorney Edward Starr. He was unopposed then In the national election. Mounts scored a landslide victory In the May 7 primary this year, defeating attorney John M. Callaway of Lake Worth, 17,381 votes to his opponent's 5,221. Mounts was first associated with the solicitor's office in 1959 before his initial 1964 victory. Mounts said he will continue to serve the public through the efforts of his office In the cause of effective law enforcement. Critics Hit Flood Cause ROME (AP) A torrent of criticism crashed on the Italian government Tuesday in the aftermath of the Piedmont floods that took more than 100 lives. Political opponents blamed the government for not doing enough in the way of flood control to counter the flood dangers that seem to get worse in Italy every year. It was the same kind of accusation that battered the government of Premier Aldo Moro following the Florence-Venice floods two years ago this month. The present premier, Giovanni Leone, scheduled an emergency meeting of his all-Christian Democrat minority Cabinet for Wednesday to consider the situation. Budget Minister Emllto Colombo promised emergency aid legislation would be decreed. Leading the cry for Immediate legislation, the big Communist party demanded urgent measures to ensure continued full salaries for the 15,000 workers who lost their livelihoods In the disaster that swept the Piedmont area of northwest Italy over the weekend. The party insisted that the government move swiftly to restore the ravaged region, suspend all taxes there and launch an immediate program to rebuild the area's industries. An estimated 60 per cent of Italy's textile factories were knocked out of operation by floodwaters and mountain landslides. The pressure on the government was Intensified by the lack of any major improvements In national flood control since the floods of November 1966. C. E. McGehee Unofficial Returns Continued From Page 1 Tax Collector McGehee, 33,170 Doherty, 15,818 Supervisor of Elections Clark, 23,855 Beasley, 25,417 County Commissioners Van Kessel, 24,356 Cupepper, 26,483 Johnson, 27,902 Jewell, 20,057 Bailey, 24,1 Weaver, 24,787 Member Board of Public Instruction Wymer 25,062 Kimmel, M.D. 24,462 Member, Board of Public Instruction McKay 26,976 Jones Jr. 19,940 Port Commissioners, Sub-District Group 1: French 4,977 Spencer 8,116 Group 2: Ganaway 4,835 Burns 8,404 Unopposed Republican Candidates Judge, District Cort of Appeal Reed Jr. 26,801 State Senator Bafalls 26,817 Republican State House of Representatives Reed Jr. 26,664 James 25,705 Judge, Small Claims Magistrate Court Kohl 26,015 Superintendent of Public Instruction Early 26,461 Port Commissioner Sub-District 1 Cassidy 1,409 Unopposed Democrat County Solicitor Mounts Jr. 17,297 Proposed Constitution Rev. No. 1: For 21,782, against, 9,292 Rev. No. 2: against, 9,006 Rev. No. 3: For, 20,649; For, 21,046; against, 9,347 Court Orders Slaying Retrial TALLAHASSEE (UPI) -The State Supreme Court Tuesday ordered new trials for two men on death row who were convicted In the 1965 slaying of a Tampa man. In a 4-3 decision, the court ordered new trials for Jose Manuel Sosa and Richard Austin Greene, convicted in the slaying of Nlcanor Martinez. The court's majority opinion said the evidence In the Hillsborough Circuit Court trial was "definitely lacking In establishing beyond a reasonable doubt that the defendants committed murder in the first degree and that the Interests of justice require a new trial." The Palm Beach Post 2751 S. Dixie Highway West Palm Beach, Fla. 33402 Pvbilihrd every morning nrnl Saturday and Sunday by Perry Pub-Ucatlonj, Inc., at 27M S DUle Highway, Weil Palm Beach, Fla. Earned aa aecond claaa mall al Weal Palm Beach. Publlthed every Saturday and Sunday In con-bl nation wlrn The Palm Reach Tlmea, aa The Palm Beach Poil Tlmea. Subscription rale and additional Utformatloa on Editorial Pag. Incumbent Criminal Court Judge Russell H. Mcintosh, Democrat of West Palm Beach, appeared headed for victory Tuesday night over his Republican opponent, Judge William Carter White. With 48 of 114 precincts reporting, Judge Mcintosh, the senior criminal court judge, had 10,862 votes to White's 9,231. Mcintosh took an early but slim lead, with a 486 vote margin after totals from 22 precincts. It would be Judge Mcintosh's third term In office having been first elected In 1960 and re-elected In 1964. Mcintosh campaigned, primarily, for respect for law and order and said this respect can only be brought about through "firmness and fairness." The judge also campaigned for dignity In the courts, a principle lie said he had maintained during his past eight years in office Mcintosh, a resident of West Palm Beach since 1924, practiced law In Florida for 11 years prior to his initial election as Judge of the Criminal Court. It was the first time Judge White had run for election to the Criminal Court. A Magistrate Court Judge since his appointment to that office in 1967, he gave up the job to run for the higher office. White of West Palm Beach, Is presently a member of the legal staff of the Central and South Florida Flood Control District and a member of the Florida Bar Committee on Juvenile delinquency and crime prevention. Walkout Ends MIAMI ( UPI ) The staff of the University of Miami's school newspaper, "The Hurricane," ended a one-day walkout over not being able to select its own editor Tuesday. News Editor Bruce Rubin said the Board of Publications had agreed to consider the staff requests to elect an editor. The board's earlier refusal to allow the staff a voice In the selection erupted In a walkout by 30 members of the staff. "I feel that this Is In the best Interest of the university and everyone, and I feel that we should try new means." ficial 15,354 to Mrs. Wymer's 14.4, with 50 polling places reporting. At mid point, unopposed Republican County School Supt. Lloyd F. Early had 15,444 votes. "I am very happy. It Is great. What more can I say," Early commented. Mrs. McKay, who holds a master's degree in chemistry from the University of Florida, is a science teacher at Belle Glade Junior High School. Her husband, Milton McKay, is an attorney and a member of the Palm Beach Junior Colege District Board of Trustees. Dr. Kimmel, who lives at 375 Valley Forge Road, is In general practice and on the staff at both St. Mary and Good Samaritan Hospitals. He Is president-elect of the Palm Beach County Medical Mrs. McKay, Kimmel Lead School Board Race By JANE ARPE Staff Writer With slightly less than half of the precincts reporting and 6,300 absentee ballots to be counted today, Mrs. Ann McKay, Republican, of Belle Glade, and Dr. Bernard Kimmel, Democrat, of West Palm Beach, went Into the lead In a close battle for seats on the Palm Beach County School Board. Mrs. McKay, who led from the first, had an unofficial total of 15,655 against 12,541 for her Democratic opponent, John Paul Jones, with 50 of the county's 114 precincts totaled. The contest between Dr. Kimmel and the Republican candidate, Mrs. Thelma Wy-mer, seesawed throughout the early evening, with Mrs. Wy-mer taking an early lead. Kimmel began to swing ahead about 9 p.m., tallying an unof

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