The Palm Beach Post from West Palm Beach, Florida on December 8, 1976 · Page 115
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December 8, 1976

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The Palm Beach Post from West Palm Beach, Florida · Page 115

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West Palm Beach, Florida
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Wednesday, December 8, 1976
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Page 115
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FP&L Man Sprays Dog; Owner Gets $30, 000 By THOM SMITH . Pot Stall Wrlttr Despite losing $30,000 to a customer who sued Florida Power &LightCo. (FP&L) meter readers and bill collectors will continue to use a spray repellent to protect themselves from hostile dogs. "We don't use the spray to hurt dogs," FP&L District Manager Harold Hayes said yesterday. "We use it to protect our people. I'd say the majority of our people love animals." Meter readers and bill collectors use the aerosol spray "HALT" to ward off snarling canines. Hayes says the spray is less harmful than that used by mailmen and causes no harmful side effects. Nevertheless, a Palm Beach County Circuit Court jury decided that FP&L and its bill collector, Terrance O'Neil, were liable for $30,000 in damages in a suit filed by Terry Bryant of West Palm Beach. O'Neil arrived at Bryant's home on Sept. 8, 1975 to collect a past-due bill but found his path to the front door blocked by Bryant's dog, which was tied to the porch. A "Beware of Dog" warning was posted. When the dog advanced, O'Neil testified, he swatted the animal on the nose with his metal clipboard. The dog then became angry and O'Neil sprayed the "HALT." Bryant and his brother came out of the house at that point and Bryant slapped at O'Neil and told him to leave the dog alone, according to testimony. protect himself. In the ensuing melee, O'Neil was injured and his automobile was damaged. However, the jury accepted Bryant's contention that O'Neil precipitated the dispute and awarded Bryant $5,000 in compensatory damages and $25,000 in punitive damages. Attorneys for FP&L have filed a motion for a new trial, charging, among other things, that the jury rendered a sympathy verdict. construed as indicative of company policy because of the unusual nature of the incident. "Our people probably don't use it once a month," he said of the spray. "They're usually well acquainted with dogs in the area and make arrangements to read meters in some other way. "The spray is not used promiscuously." He said the spray is effective for about five minutes. "We've tried it on our own dogs," he said, "and some of our people even tried it on themselves with no ill effects." O'Neil said he then sprayed Bryant to Hayes said the Bryant case should not be Awards WEATHER Partly cloudy through Thursday with a 30 per The Palm Beach Post cent chance of showers Low tonight in the mid 50s. High in the low mid-70s. DATA A2 VOL. LXVIII NO. 217 1 Pyle Kennedy Pulitzer 114 PAGES-:-PRICE FIFTEEN CENTS WEST PALM BEACH, FLORIDA, WEDNESDAY MORNING, DECEMBER 8, 1976 Cabinet Job Hopefuls, Carter Tall 1A kt t 4. V ti a-, It .": 4MK tusgt . ' 1 iU fc f "fii II $1 t i I ' . ,T,.. ... , .ft . . , By MAURICE FLIES and ANDREW J. GLASS Cox Ntwspapon Wrlttri ATLANTA President-elect Jimmy Carter met yesterday with five prominent Americans whose names have been mentioned in connection with the possible composition of his Cabinet. Carter will interview other individuals before leaving Atlanta today to fly to Washington. Jane Cahill Pfeiffer, a former vice president of IBM Corp., confirmed yesterday that she is among those who will meet with Carter here today. She is considered a strong possibility for secretary of commerce. Rep. Brock Adams (D-Wash.), chairman of the House Budget Committee, also will meet with Carter here today. Adams is being considered as secretary of transportation, according to sources. Former Maine Gov. Kenneth Curtis, an early Carter supporter, also was reported to be in Atlanta for consultation and discussions with Carter. Curtis is understood to be a possible candidate for chairman of the Democratic National Committee. The current chairman, Robert Strauss, is resigning effective the day after Carter's inauguration. It had been reported earlier that Dr. Harold Brown, president of the California Institute of Technology and a leading contender for defense secretary, will see Carter today. Visitors yesterday to the Georgia governor's mansion, which Carter has been allowed to use for the discussions with Cabinet possibilities and advisers, were: James R. Schlesinger, fired late in 1975 as President Ford's defense secretary. A onetime director of the CIA, he is believed to be under consideration for an intelligence post in the Carter administration. Zbigniew Brzezinski, a member of the Policy Planning Council during the Johnson administration. He was Carter's chief foreign policy adviser during the campaign and appears to be heading the list of candidates for director of the National Security Council. He is a Columbia University professor. Patricia Roberts Harris, once ambassador to Luxembourg and a former dean of the Howard University Law School. Now in private law practice in Washington, she is thought to be in the running for attorney general or U.S. ambassador to the United Nations. Paul Warnke, an assistant defense secretary under Johnson who is now a Washington lawyer. He has been linked to the job of CIA director or another top national security post. Turn to POLITICS, A? Stall Photo By Gtorg Wtdding Palm Beach in a haze. Weather officials predict little or no fog today, but temperatures will likely be in the mid-60s at daybreak. was going on around you. Fog covered much of Palm Beach County, prompting travelers' warnings for motorists and leaving much of West IN A FOG If you were fishing driving or walking around in yesterday morning's early hours, chances are you didn't see much of what Swine Flu Case Found in Wisconsin evidence is found of person-to-person transmission of the disease in the Brodhead area "we may be starting to see the first seeding of swine flu." The so-called "seeding" of the influenza virus occurs shortly before outbreaks of the ailment. The swine flu suffered during Thanksgiving week by Don Harris, a 23-year-old Brodhead farm employe who has recovered, was diagnosed by Dr. Bernard Eas-terday, a University of Wisconsin influenza expert who had gone to the farm to check an outbreak of swine flu among hogs there, Berreth said. Harris said that he did not feel any more ill than he did when he had flu before and really did not think he was very ill. Easterday confirmed that several of the hogs had the disease, but the CDC has not decided for sure how Harris got the illness, he said. There have been instances in the past of persons contracting the disease from working with hogs. A Concordia, Mo., telephone lineman, Larry Hardison, is believed to have had the disease and recovered in October but that could not be confirmed, Berreth said. Tests on Hardison's blood showed a rise in antibodies against swine flu, an indication that he had had the disease, Berreth said. But he said throat tests which might have shown viral infection, as they did in Harris' case, could not be taken because Hardison recovered before it was suspected he had swine flu. Three CDC epidemiologists have gone from Concordia to Brodhead to investigate the illness, and the federal agency plans more blood tests on Harris, he said. The first blood tests on the Wisconsin man did not show a significant rise in swine flu antibodies, but Berreth said that was not necessarily a contradictory finding because the antibodies build only gradually after the illness occurs and might be forming now. From Pod Wlro Sorvicot ATLANTA Government scientists said yesterday that a Wisconsin farm worker had the first confirmed case of swine flu this fall and investigators are looking for signs of the illness among other residents of the Brodhead, Wis., area. "Further investigation is necessary before the significance of the swine flu can be assessed," said Don Berreth of the national Center for Disease Control (CDC). "There is, however, no indication that there is extensive upper respiratory illness in that area." Dr. Donald Millar, coordinator of the national swine influenza immunization program at the CDC, said that if Inside Today- - it if v- 1 I Si K Swiss Police Track Down Nazi Officer ZURICH, Switzerland (UPI) - Police yesterday announced the arrest of fugitive Dutch millionaire art dealer Pieter Menten, accused of responsibility for the death of at least 300 Polish Jews during World War II while he was a Nazi SS officer. Tracked down in a secluded hotel where he. had registered under an assumed name and said he was an Irish lord, Menten surrendered to police on an Interpol warrant shortly before midnight Monday. A Dutch police captain said documents in his room indicated he had intended to fly to New York today. Once in custody, he tried three times to take tranquilizers, then fainted. Swiss police said it was not a suicide attempt, however. The Netherlands immediately asked for Menten's extradition, Swiss government officials said. But there are legal and diplomatic complications since Switzerland has no law governing war crimes. The Swiss government agreed in 1965 to expel any alien suspected of "crimes against humanity" - usually to the destination of his choice - but a spokesman said "in this case ... it would be taken into consideration which country wants such a person back in order to face charges." Justice ministers . Andreas van Agt of the Netherlands and ljurt Fuegler of Switzerland met in Bern during the afternoon to discuss the extradition request, and Fuegler said, "As a nation of justice we will not take any premature decisions." Van Agt, who returned to Amsterdam, said he would try "to find the best and fastest way to get this man back to Holland." Menten, who served an eight-month prison term in 1950 for collaborating with the Nazis, fled his 25-room villa near Amsterdam two weeks ago - one day before he was to have been picked up for questioning about charges he was responsible for the death of at last 300 Jews in Poland. Dutch authorities made an international request for his arrest. The allegations against Menten, raised earlier this year by journalists in Holland and Israel, include the suspicion he sent Jews to their death while he was a Nazi SS officer in 1941 and 1942. Menten reportedly went to Poland in 1930 and built up a property and art business. After his alleged SS service he returned to Holland in 1943 with two railroad boxcars full of xaluable paintings. AP Wlropholo WINTRY-LIKE - It wasn't a snow- 11 degrees - was mild compared to a storm but a broken water pipe spraying town in Minnesota where it was a ch- water that created this winter scene in cn-cmiiy 45 beiow. Weather Information, A2 Tulsa, Okla. The temperature there Court The Supreme Court rules that a General Electric sick leave program does not have to include pregnancy benefits. The ruling said the company was not guilty of sex discrimination in a suit filed by female GF employes. Story, A6 i I ' t J Haldheim The U.N. Security Council, after two ballots, endorses Austria's Kurt Waldheim for a second term as secretary-general. Index Amusements BA,7 Bassine El Business E9 Classified D5-11 Comics B8 Crossword Puzzle B8 Editorials A8 Listening Post A9 Letters A8 Mitchell Dl Obituaries D4 Stocks E6-8 TV Column B9 Klslngcr AP Wiropftoto I FEEL GREAT The California Supreme Court's decision to strike down the state's 1974 death penalty law prompts a smile from inmate Dave Pederson after hearing the good news from behind his cell bars in San Quentin prison. Yesterday's ruling was the second in five years In California and affects 65 men and two women now on death row. Story, A7 Secretary of State Henry Kissinger, making his last likely European journey, arrives in Brussels where he will attempt to save his foundering majority rule plan for Rhodesia. Story, A8 Wiggins Bl J A

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