The Fairmount News from Fairmount, Indiana on November 24, 1921 · Page 7
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November 24, 1921

The Fairmount News from Fairmount, Indiana · Page 7

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Fairmount, Indiana
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Thursday, November 24, 1921
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Page 7
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THE FA1RM0UNT NEWS "DTT SnUED DV LIFE" Vi9 Feelis j Tribal f a Vfeaaa to FARM NEWS DEPARTMENT 6 0 O f:::l READ HER LETTER IT WILL DO YOU GOOD 'Pe-ru-na haa been a, Godsend to me. I feel safe in saying that it saved my life. I was all run down and miserable when I commenced taking Pe-ru-na, but am on the road to recovery now. 1 cannot thank rcu too much." MRS. CHARLES ANSPAUOH. R. F. E. No. 7, Lagrange, Indiana. A letter like this brings hope and the promise fit health to every sick and suffering woman. Perhaps you know what It means to have your dally duties a misery, every movement an effort, stomach dernr.gert. pains in the head, back and loins most of the time, nrrvea raw and quivering not a moment day or night free from suffering. to as Mrs. Anspaugh did. Take Pe-ru-na. Don's wait but start right away. PICRIC ACID MADE FOR WAR IS USEFUL FOR BLASTING STUMPS L v -A f LZi 2L. 5 ft3?$i TABLETS OR LIQUID SOLD EVERYWHERE FRESH GARBAGE SAVES COST to PLANT BLACK WALNUT TREES Short cuts to success are mire tramp down somebody's grass. Travel may not always cure Ill-health. It helps one to forget it. Particularly Adapted for Public Park3, Lawns. Along Highways and Other Places. Sacrifices you are glad to make may be the real article. Just the same. The more a man goes around in the world the less cranky he becomes. If Carefully Selected and Kept Free of Broken Glass and Tin 30 Per Cent Saving Made. rrer-5i by t'nlteJ Stts L"rrtmont of Agriculture A i radical manner of reducing the production costs of market eggs consists in feedlr.g fresh garbage placed lefore the foek as soon as possible after i has been rejected from the Frepsrd by the fnitut States Department of Agriculture.) The war demand drew heavily upon the black-walnut timber supply. The condition became alarming, as it was reootrnized that unless there should be a decrease in the cutting, the merchantable trees would soon be gone. Fortunately, however, the war etided before the larger trees entirely disappeared. Now a reaction Is setting In. IMack walnuts are being planted In small numbers by many persons, directly in harmony with the policy advocated by the United States Department of Agriculture. A conspicuous instance of planting occurrod near Saginaw, Mich. Iast fall. W. S. Linton, president of the Northern Nut Growers association, procured .0 bushels of walnuts from titles at the home of (Jeorge Washington at Mount Vernon. Va. These were shipped to Saginaw and in the main distributed among the school children f the county and planted, two in a table. Used judiciously it will reduce the cost of egg and meat production j from 23 to 30 per cent. The garbage must be fresh ar.d free from all fer- mentation and sourness. The intrinsic j value of garbage as a poultry feed is due to the fact that it provides a ! varied ration which tits all the needs ; ud requirements of the flock. j One explanation of why the sinail flock owner, with his backyard bevy j of hens, secures heavy production of j eggs, hir.ges around the fact that he I emphasizes the use of table scraps In j the ration. Similar results obtain where large commercial flocks are (AJdu Uuiubl To Blast a Stump Successfully Requires Experience and Judgment. trrprd by the Cnlted States Pprtm(nt of Agriculture.) Distribution by the United States allowances of Eiven access to daily sanitary, well-selected and palatable Department of AgrictUture of 12.500,- Never say "Aspirin" without saying "Bayer." WARNING! Unless you see name "Bayer" on tablets, you are not getting genuine Aspirin prescribed by physicians over 21 years and proved safe by millions for Colds Headache Rheumatism Toothache Neuralgia Neuritis Earache Lumbago Pain, Pain Accept only "Bayer" package which contains proper directions. Handy tin boxes of 12 tablets Bottles of 24 and 100 All druggist. Aspirin is tb trade mark of Bayer Manufacture of Monoaaetleartdester of SallcjlteacM jrarbaire. Alihouch the character of j (XXI pounds of picric acid salvaged garbasr? varies tlmmchout the year, j from the war stores and designed to due to the fact that more succulent be used for farm explosives will vegetables and fruits are used during arouse interest in the desirability and the summer, this refuse is also a val- j practicability cf blasting stumps to :able substitute Tor costly grains and ; dear off old wood lots for crop pur-omeontrates in the hen menu. j poses. Unfortunate results which iu some i Not Commercially Available, instames l ave followed the use of j picric acid is rather higher In es-garbage ire due to feeding a mixture rjCsive power than ordinary commer-of table scraps that was not carefully c,a, dynamite as used In agriculture. STEWARD LET DOWN LIGHTLY hill, on school grounds and along public roads and streets. Two thousand were placed in a nursery for later transplanting in one of the public parks of Saginaw. When it became known that these nuts were available for planting, very keen and widespread interest in them developed. Telephone cads for them were numerous. Automobilists drove for many miles to cull in person. Sine then, enthusiastically attended meetings have been held in various places in the state to consider the question of black walnut tree planting along the highways. The suggestion is made that in view of the known differences of hardiness existing In many species of native trees, special care should be exercised to avoid extensive planting Many a man is giveu credit for being a hustler when he Is only nervous. In View of Silly Assertion, One Would Have Liked to See Him More Harshly Handled. by driving a lH-i"ch crowbar with a ten-pound maul. In wood, of course, an auger Is required. Sometimes It is wise to set off a small charge In the bottom of the hole to form a chamber and after the hole has cooled tamp it full of slit cartridges. If the soil Is dry, the paper covering of the cartridges may be slit with a sharp knife and the cartridges tamped into a solid mass with a wooden stick. Cartridges may be divided by slitting the paper around and breaking. Never attempt to slit a frozen cartridge. To prime the charge, cut off the proper length of fuse, allowing at least 2 feet per minute required to get to safety after firing. Open the cap box and allow one cap to slide Into the hand. Never pick or pry out a cap with a stick or wire, as they are very sensitive. Slip the end of the fuse snugly Into the open end of the cap. Crimp the cap on with a crimper. If the charge Is to be fired in water, apply a little grease around the top of the cap. With the crimper handle, or a stick the size of a lead pencil, make a hole In the side of the cartridge, inclining it so the part to be occupied by the cap will be parallel with the side of the cartridge. If the cartridge is to be fired under water, apply ?oni water- For your daughter's sake, use Red Cross Ball Blue In the laundry. She will then have that dainty, well-groomed appearance that girls admire. selected. Hens like fresh garbage, but are not able to digest scraps of tin. phonograph need'.cs and similar foreign materia!. Unless such substances are separated frvnn the garbage, disastrous results invariably fellow and the pouitryman som ala;idMAs garbage fectilng and condemns it as unsatisfactory. The Department of Ag-iicultr i-ecommetHis that fre-h g ;r- A hotel steward said to be known from the Atlantic to the Pacific, and for forty years an observer of people who eat in public dining rooms, is reported as saying at a convention EASY THING TO PLACE HIM j but for manufacturing reasons Is not : likely to be on the market after the : government's supply is disposed of. j For stump and rock blasting work it ; is used in practically the same way, being exploded by a detonating cap, either with a fuse or an electric detonator. For tap-rooted stumps a good meth-i od Is to dig away enough earth at the side to permit boring an inclined hole 1 well down past the center at the I depth where it is desired to cut the ) root cff. The hole should be at least , eight inches deeper than the length of i the cartridge to allow fer tamping. , This charge may be fired by fuse or electricity, or two or more charges of nuts or trees from the warmer por- j of public food purveyors that "Amer- tlons of the country in sections where : lean women have forgotten how to destructively low temperatures are oc- j cook." The gentleman speaks with- easionaily experienced. j out knowledge of the facts. We may Doutbless the safest rule to observe I excuse him only because he has been I ! in the North is to plant nuts from trees that have attained irood sire and w penned up in public eating places for so many years that he has lost all sense of proportion and lacks facts for comparison. American women have not forgotten how to cook. Their good, wholesome, well-prepared food for home dining room feeds, and feeds amazingly well, SO per cent of the pop- r HI i r a proof.nsr substance. Tie the fuse in j place with a string around the fuse j and the cartridge. Then carefully ; place the cartridge in the blast hole, i i platlon. So general Is good home cooking that every man forced by cir Colored Man Might Have Thought He Was a Lion Tamer, but Comrades Knew Otherwise. Three negro soldiers in France were engaged In the great American pastime of slinging it. "Will Johnson, wat yo' business back in de States?" "Ah runs de biggest alleviatah In Washington." "Sam Jeffa.son, wat yo' do In de States?" "Ise de champeen crapshootah of Richmond, Vahginny." "Yo' nlggas mighty po' class, suah miff," said Bo Jackson. "All's a lion tamah fo' de circus. Ah takes dem fresh, fierce lions an' twists 'em by tall until they turns round an' tries to snap me. Den I grabs dar tongues and pulls 'er out, so dat when they tries to bite me, dey bites dar own tongue, and dat away Ah tames a lion iu 'bout foh houahs." "Go 'way. Bo, yo' a'n't no lion tamah yo' is a lyln' niggah." The Home Sector. 4 a? "-a jNOi.. y A t c v.- i j may no piacea in notes arounu me outside of the root and fired with cn electric blasting machine. Sometimes ! even one large charge, planted deep ! on the outside of the root, will do the j work. 5 - Where stumps have lateral roots. ; some experience and judgment will be necessary in placing the explosive, es-! pecially if only one charge is used. ! Generally the center of resistance will be the center of the stump, although making sure the cap stays In position, j Priming for electric discharge Is much simpler. Directions go with the ap- ! paratus. Wooden Stick for Tamping. Hnvin? nlnr-ed tho rrtmpl nhnrto It ! cumstances to get his meals at public places regards himself as unfortunate because he cannot always eat at home, or at somebody else's home. This hotel steward is full of misinformation. Chlcaeo Journal of Commerce. f u JriN- 1 1 The Provident Hens Relish Fresh Garbage and Daily Await the Appearance of the Garbage Wager. sometimes roots on one side are much stronger than on the other. The depth requires careful consideration. For small stumps the charge should be at least two feet deep.' while larsrer stumps with wide-spreading Gloomhounds. Tell me not in mournful numbers Anything you have to say. If you deal In blues and umbers, Get ! A vaunt ! Be on your way I hage be run through a meat or vegetable chopper, and mixed with a little Sandv ii-e ! roots snou:u oe icaueu oeeper. cround feed before it is fed to ! Life is drear. Ah, well I knew it, ! And don't wish to know it more. Told by some dod-gasted poet. j soil requires a deeier charge than clay few 1 s. As enich of the table refuse should The Smoker's Way. "Did you ever swear off smoking?" "Oh, yes; oIT and on." Boston Transcript. Sire of Charge. The size of the charge c:';not be hi fed as the flock w ill clean up with lUU ami lurm pest una oore. -Tennyson J. Daft, in Kansas City Star i i v. . . r . , . is necessary to tamp It. Any straight round stick, about 11 Inches in diameter and 5 feet long, will do for tamping. Never use iron. Moist clay, moist loam, and moist sand, following one another in the order named, make the best tamping material. The material should be packed lightly for four or "six inches, and then rammed as hard as the surrounding soil. Before firing see that everybody is out of the way. In firing a safety fuse it is best to split it, exposing the powder for an inch, apply a match until the powder spits, and then run to safety. If the charge fails, let It alone until next day. For large jobs It will often be found advisable to buy an electric blasting outfit, which will fire several charges at once. The bureau of public roads of the United States Department of Agriculture will give Information about the distribution of picric acid and the use of this and other explosives. The distribution, however, will be made only through state agencies. j specified briefly, but one :. :thor" y I recommends roughly one-he f pom 1 ( of 20 per cent dynamite for i retisrt in me course o: an nour. .u feed which the bin;s reject should be removed from tl e feetling pens or yards as soon as i-ossiblc thereafter. square foot of stump. With p' ric Otherwise, it sour? and contaminatt s ; acid, co-operative investigations : the of A; icuJ- the premises and. subren'Jy, if tl : e j stafes Department fowls eat i it invar.ablly cause cl- tur? nd othor institutu festive troubles. j that success can je attained w ith one- Where garbage Is fed, it is also pre- j fourth of a pound for each square foot icquisite to provide a tight ration of j of white-pine stumps, with larger grain twice daily, as well as to supply charges for hardwood stumps. The dry mash In a hopper before the flock. ! Inexperienced blaster should begin ex- periments with small stumps and ad As a rule table scraps are rich in protein and only occasionally is it neces just the charge. Holes in soil may usually be made COVER FOR FARM MACHINERY 1 without pasture, milk or tankage, min- erais are a aiuanie am. inev mar pay when fed to breeding animals. Minerals used In these tests were ground limestone, air-slaked lime, rock phosphate, bonemeal In various forms, slaked coal and salt. Every practical hog man knows the worth of charcoal, wood ashes and salt for hogs, especially In winter when hogs can't get Into the soil. Black Walnut Trees Are Favored for Public Parks, Private Lawns and Along Highways. habit, and as nearly as possible In the section where they are to be planted. No harm Is likely to result from transferring such trees from northern points to more southerly locations in so far as reaction to temperature is concerned. The suitability of the black walnut for home planting Is now being recognised as never before. That It Is one of our most valuable American trees and that its numbers have steadily been decreasing has long been realized. To a considerable extent this tree was planted on the western prairies by the first settlers in compliance with the timber and stone act, repealed In the late eighties, which required Uiat trees be planted In proportion to land taken up from the government. Some planting has been going on In states and districts beyond the range to which the species Is indigenous. Even now the forest service of the United States Department of Agriculture does not advise Its planting in pure stands on land from which income Is necessary during the lifetime of the average planter, as no returns in timber are probable under at least 35 or 40 years from the time of planting. Department experts recommend that the walnut be included among the species for planting In public parks, on large, private lawns and dooryards, along highways, and in out-of-the-way places on the farm. It is invariably the single tree planted in the open, apart from other trees, that develops Into Uie most perfect specimen. It is such trees that produce the greatest quantity of nuts. Usually the finest quality of kernel is from this source. The Key to Success Is Work There Is no Substitute for It! In order to do your best work, you must be healthy. You must sleep soundly at night, your nerves must be strong, steady and under perfect control. If you are accustomed to drinking tea or coffee with your meals or between meals, you may be loading yourself with a very great handicap. Your nervous system may be stimulated beyond what is natural for you. For tea and coffee contain thein and caffeine. These are drugs as any doctor can tell you. They are known to irritate the nervous system by their action and to cause restlessness and insomnia, which prevent the proper recuperation of the vital forces. If you want to be at your best, capable of doing the very best work that lies in you, why not stop drinking tea and coffee? Drink Postum, the rich, satisfying beverage made from scientifically roasted cereals. Postum' contains absolutely no drugs of any kind, but in flavor tastes much like rich coffee. It helps nerve and brain structure by letting you get sound restful sleep. Postum comes in two forms: Instant Postum (in tins) made instantly in the cup by the addition of boiling water. Postum Cereal (in packages of larger bulk, for those who prefer to make the drink while the meal is being prepared) made by boiling for 20 minutes. Ask your grocer for Postum. Sold everywhere. Postum for Health "There's a Reason" Excellent Plan to Oil Up All Implements and Store Away for Winter Paint Helps. You can earn a neat little sum almost any day now. Oil np the Tarm machinery and put it away under cover for the winter. That will save buying considerable new stuff next spring and surely money saved is money earned. When snow comes you can apply enough paint to make It look like new. sary to supplement the mash with ap-1 proximately 3 per cent of meat meal. During the summer garbage decomposes and ferments quickly and it must be fed before it reaches this stage. The feeding of garbage is la-vored during cold weather because In the winter the refuse keeps better. Suburban flock-owners may often secure the garbage from neighboring families who do not keep hens. This source of feed may be so plentiful that the Bock -owner can expand his hen-keeping operations and even afford to pay a small amount for the garbage. Experiments in feeding garbage at the government experiment farm at Beltsville, Md., indicate that ten hens will consume about one quart of garbage daily. A suitable dry mash as a supplement to this garbage consists of three parts by weight of cornmeal, one part of bran, one part of middlings and 5 pet" cent of meat scraps. This mash Is kept before the fowls all the time. If the table scraps contain much fruit and vegetable peelings. Plan Next Year's Garden. Right now Is the best time for us to begin to plan for our garden of next year. We can get out on the ground now and see what is what better than we can in the spring or at any time until the crop is growing again next summer. Then It Is too late to make changes. FEEDING MINERALS TO HOGS When Given in Balanced Rations They Have Little Effect on Economical Gains. Minerals fed In balanced rations to hogs had little If any effect on rapidity or economy of gains, report Ohio and more mash should be added, while If Storing Seed Corn. Proper storage facilities are highly important In the handling of seed corn. Carefully selected seed taken from the field early in the season must be protected as it passes through the drying and curing process If It Is to germinate satisfactorily the following spring. Illinois stations. They find that min the garbage consists chiefly of potato peelings, bread and meat less mash should be used. Care should be exer erals strengthen the bones of the aul mals. When pigs are not receiving balanced ration, bttt are being fed cised to drain off soapy water or ex cess liquid from the garbage.

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