The Des Moines Register from Des Moines, Iowa on September 25, 1982 · Page 6
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The Des Moines Register from Des Moines, Iowa · Page 6

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Des Moines, Iowa
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Saturday, September 25, 1982
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Page 6
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6A DES MOINES REGISTER Sat., Sept. 25, 1982 REGISTER PHOTO BY BOO muuciaunn Pentagon wants to open mail of service members i. A. N$ is 5 V .. .. ... ... t Butter line Mahaska County residents line up outside an noosed meatshop in Oskaloosa Thursday morning to receive surplus batter and cheese from the federal gov- Agency to hear North Poik case By JONATHAN ROOS Rtoiittr staff VfrNw A state agency agreed Friday to bear a sexual harassment complaint against North Polk Superintendent Richard Shockey. The Iowa Professional Teaching Practices Commission will receive testimony in the case Oct. 22. In a complaint filed with the agency by the North Polk Education Association on Sept 13, seven women instructors accused Shockey of trying to kiss or fondle them, asking for dates and making sexually suggestive comments. Shockey submitted his resignation to the North Polk School Board on Sept. 20 after the board held a closed meeting, reportedly to discuss the teachers' allegations. The resignation is effective May 30, 1983, but he will be on a paid leave of absence until then. Shockey, 42, of Alleman, has declined to comment on either his resignation or the teachers' complaint Kathleen Reimer, a Des Moines lawyer representing the North Polk School Board, wrote a letter this week to commission director Don Bennett saying the complaint should be dismissed because the school board has jurisdiction over such matters. Bennett disagreed, telling the commission that the teachers' complaint was "of sufficient substance" to be heard. No citation planned in death of Iowan MONONA, IA. (AP) - Officials of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration in Minnesota say they have no plans to file safety citations in the Sept. 11 death of Randy Mielks, SO, of Monona. Mielke died from injuries he received while making a delivery the day before to a Hopkins, Minn., store. A large garbage dumpster being loaded onto a truck nearby tipped over, pinning Mielke against his truck. Ivan Russell of the Minnesota OSHA said no violation of safety standards could be found. "I don't have any answers to why that tanker went off on its side," he said. New survey rates ISU high in 'scholarly quality' WASHINGTON, D.C. (AP) - California universities got high ratings in a report that judged the scholastic quality of math and science departments at the nation's major research campuses. Iowa State University was listed among the leaders in one of the six fields, based on ratings of the the "scholarly quality" of the schools. The evaluations were based on a survey of 1,155 math and science professors, or about 8 percent of all U.S. professors in those fields. The California Institute of Technology was ranked No. 1 either alone or with others in three of the six fields, and two other California schools, the University of California at Berkeley and Stanford, each held two No. 1 rankings. Harvard also was ranked No. 1 in two fields. The California Institute of Technology was the leader in geoeciences, shared top billing with Harvard in physics and was in a four-way tie for first in chemistry with California-Berkeley, Harvard and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Stanford was tops in computer sciences and shared the No. 1 place in statlstics-biostatistics with California-Berkeley. Iowa State was In a tie for fifth place in statiatics-biosta-tistlcs with Harvard, Cornell, Princeton and the University of North Carolina. Reagan: Social issues not just 'gimmick' Continued from Page One make-work program for, at best, 200,000 people. . . ." He called on Congress to pass the compromise legislation that be said "will provide job training for 1 million people or more per year in the private sector." "So, my question to the speaker is, which Is it going to be, Tip? Temporary or permanent? Two hundred thousand or one million? Make-work or training for lasting jobs? A political solution of spend and spend, borrow and borrow, or real economic opportunity for people looking to us for effective help and leadership?" O'Neill's Support Only a few hours earlier, O'Neill had told reporters that he would back the compromise bill that would replace the Comprehensive Employment and Training Act, but be said he does not consider it a substitute for the $1 billion measure to create jobs in state and local government that Democrats pushed through the House earlier this month. Reagan's declaration to continue the fight for conservative social issues came on the heels of Senate rejection Thursday of a measure to allow prayer in public schools. A week earlier, the Senate set aside a watered-down anti-abortion package. Reagan will preside today at a White House candle-lighting ceremony for a school prayer rally to be held later in the day. Rally sponsors predict several thousand people will turn out for the event Larry Speakes, deputy White House press secretary, said Reagan's participation had been planned well ahead of time and was not triggered by criticism from Senator Jesse Helms, the North Carolina Republican who led the unsuccessful school prayer fight. 'Down in Flames' Helms has accused the White House of not producing a single vote in any of the social issue battles. Helms tried to attach the school prayer proposal to a bill raising the debt ceiling, and one administration official said the issue "got murked up' ... and went down in flames." The official, speaking privately, said the White House "would like a straight up-or-down vote on school prayer" and said that if the White On a separate ranking on the estimated influence of articles in scientific journals attributed to the colleges' graduate 'programs in 1878-79, California-Berkeley was No. 1 in mathematics and statistics; MIT was first in physics; UCLA led in geosciences; the University of Wisconsin was No. 1 in chemistry, and the University of Illinois was first in computer sciences. Iowa State was ranked No. 10 in statistics. The rankings were among 16 separate measures produced in a two-year, 1500,000 study published Thursday with the imprimatur of four prestigious academic groups the American Council of Learned Societies, the American Council on Education, the Social Services Research Council and the National Research Council. Four volumes will be issued later evaluating doctoral programs in humanities, engineering, biological sciences and social and behavioral sciences at 228 universities. The study updated a 1970 American Council on Education report that ranked schools based solely on reputation a method often critldxed as biased and unscientific. The ratings in the new report were based on a survey of experts who rated the strength of the faculty at 50 institutions. ernment. The cheese and batter were distributed around Iowa Wednesday throflgh Friday. However, Oskaloosa ran oat of goods Thorsday. House had managed the issue, "we would have met with greater success." A story in the New York Times Friday quoted unnamed presidential advisers as saying that the social issues do not have a nationwide impact on voters, and should be stressed only to selected audiences. Reagan, without specifically naming the newspaper, told the magazine editors: "This morning, some of the press began speculating that, somehow, recent attempts on some social issues . . . were somehow just a political gimmick and now we've discarded that and we're moving on to something else. "I believe this country is hungry for a spiritual revival," Reagan said, promising to fight for social issues. . Speakes said Reagan's agenda also includes a constitutional amendment requiring a balanced budget and tuition tax credits for parents with children in private and parochial school, as well as the anti-abortion and school prayer legislation. 'Maximum Effort' "We have gone all out to get these issues passed in Congress," Speakes said. "The president has expended a maximum effort" The compromise job-training bill that Reagan supports calls for 70 percent of the money in the program to go directly for training. In the CETA program that expires Sept 30, that percentage was used up in direct payments to participants and in administrative costs. O'Neill said Reagan's endorsement of the bill was a step in the right direction. "I hope we can get some sensitivity into the man's system and change him around a bit," O'Neill said. 2 Monona residents die in road accident RdrtT't tows Ntws Swtcv MARQUETTE, IA. Two Monona residents were killed and two others' were critically injured early Friday in a one-car accident on a Clayton County road northwest of here. Killed were Cheryl Barker, 23, and James Lee Johnson, 33. Critically injured were Pauline Dettmann, 25, and Donnie Scheffett, 35. Both were taken to a LaCrosse, Wis., hospital Two others in the car were treated at a hospital and released. They are Dennis P. Wagner, 23, of Monona, driver of the car, and Darla Schlitter, 19, of Luana. The accident was reported about 4 a.m. Authorities said the six were returning from Prairie du Chlen, Wis., when the car, traveling at high speed, went out of control struck a rock embankment, rolled and landed on its top. Sweets for the sweet HARARE, ZIMBABWE (AP) -The United States and Zimbabwe on Friday signed agreements worth the equivalent of $7.4 million for family planning and for sugar refining projects. Woolco had Continued from Page One Woolworth's considering Woolco to be but one of its specialty operations. Kmart, with 1,900 stores, is the nation's second largest retailer, behind Sears, Roebuck & Co. J.C. Penney & Co. is No. 3. Gibbon said the restructuring was In line with Woolworth's commitment to expansion of specialty retail operations and a "redeployment of assets away from areas producing low or no return on investment" The parent company earned $82 million on sales of $7.2 billion in fiscal 1981, which ended Jan. 31. Woolco contributed sales of $2 1 billion. Woolworth said that had Woolco Hissing boy's body is found at Spirit Lake 1t KHMfl lwi Ntwt Krvtc MILFORD, IA. - Authorities said Friday that they have found the body of 14-year-old Shawn Lee Jacobsen of Milford, who disappeared while on his way to school 'Mllford des moines) Monaay. The body was 0 200 found about 6:30 p.m. Friday in a rural area west of Spirit Lake. The body reportedly was found by a farmer. Spirit Lake is about eight miles north of Milford. Dickinson County Sheriff Wendell Kilts said the cause of the boy's death had not yet been determined. He declined to release more information about the boy's death. County sheriff's officers, Milford police and agents of the Iowa Division of Criminal Investigation searched the area where the body was found Friday night A neighbor of the Jacobsen family said the identification of the body was based on clothing the boy was wearing. The boy's books and lunch pail were found Monday near a water-filled gravel pit near Milford. Authorities had searched all week for the missing boy. Ponds and gravel pits - were dragged and about 300 people joined in the effort, which was focused on a rugged area west of Milford. About 60 of Jacobsen's high school classmates joined in the search Thursday, again combing the area west of Milford. It wrs not known whether the boy had met with foul play or had been the victim of an accident. His father, Raymond, had said Thursday that he was certain his son had not run away. "I know my boy," he said. "And he'd never run away." DCI Chief Gerald Shanahan said criminologists were flown to the scene Friday night. His agents also are Involved in the investigation two weeks ago of a 12-year-old West Des Moines youth, John Gosch. But he said Friday night that "as far as we know, there is no connection" between the cases of the two missing boys. Bell to speak at Bob Jones WASHINGTON, D.C. (AP) -Education Secretary T.H. Bell will address the 6,300 students and faculty at Bob Jones University at a special convocation on the Greenville, S.C., campus next week, an aide said. Friday. Bob Jones is one of two schools involved in a pending Supreme Court case over whether schools with racially discriminatory policies are entitled to federal tax exemptions. Bell will speak next Friday night on the topic, "Restoring Traditional American Values in the 1980s." $2.1 billion in been discontinued prior to the company's last fall fiscal year, it would have had a profit of $147 million on sales of $5.1 billion. Woolco had an operating loss last year of $19 million before applying other heavy costs attributable to Woolco'i business, Woolworth said, primarily heavy interest expense on borrowed funds. For the first six months of its current fiscal year, Woolworth said, it would have reported a loss of $5 million rather than a loss of $23 million if Woolco had been discontinued. First half sales were $3.3 billion, of which $1 billion came from Woolco. In the first half, Woolco's operating loss, before other costs, was $21 million. J'We believe that the figures NORFOLK, VA. (AP) - The Pentagon is seeking authority to open the mail of service members for the first time since World War H, but the goal is to search for drugs and other contraband rather than security breaches. Defense Department officials who have sought such authority for the last two years said Friday that an agreement has almost been reached with the U.S. Postal Service. The Norfolk Ledger-Star quoted a senior Navy officer as saying the Navy hopes to have the authority by Oct. 1. Only during wartime has such authority previously been granted, and then only for security reasons. But the Pentagon's fight against drug abuse in the armed forces has been described as a "war effort" In Itself, officials contend. According to Pentagon officials, military commanders, who suspect that mail contains drugs have been prohibited from opening the parcels unless a U.S. postal inspector is present. The amended regulation would allow the commanding officer of a ship or field unit to open the mail if be has probable cause to suspect it contains contraband "This will be extremely valuable to the Navy," Rear Adm. Paul Mulloy, director of the Navy's human resources management division in Washington, told the Ledger-Star. "There have been cases where boxes break open and you actually see the material and you were not allowed to touch it, unless you could get a federal postal inspector. Well, that's pretty hard to do in the middle of the Indian Ocean," Mulloy said. Writer offers kidney to set book published DETROIT, MICH. (AP) - Many frustrated writers are desperate to see their novels get into print, but Alvadore Chevalier has gone further than most he took out a newspaper ad offering to swap a kidney for help in getting his thriller published. Chevalier, a 55-year-old former high school English teacher, said he placed the ad in the Detroit News because he tired of rejection slips from publishers. Chevalier lives In Windsor, Ontario, just across the river from Detroit and suffers from a heart condition that ended his teaching career 12 years ago. But he said a kidney is "something I could live without and still go on writing." After his retirement in 1970, Chevalier wrote a fictional account of free-lance spy Marty Marto, who for $1 million takes on the task of trying to eliminate Dr. Kill, leader of a dangerous ring of international gangsters. Chevalier polished his tale and sent the manuscript of "Get Dr. Kill" to four or five publishers. No one wanted it Discouraged by the novel's cool reception and by years of rejection slips for bis poetry, short stories, plays and several other novels, Chevalier took out the newspaper ad for "Get Dr. Kill." The ad says: "Get yourself a kidney. I will donate a kidney to any person or organization that will become my partner and assist me in having my novel Get Dr. Kill' published and share with me the profits accrued by it I am unemployed and handicapped." So far there have been no offers, he said. Man pleads guilty of sexual assaults OMAHA, NEB. (AP) - A man accused of stalking women featured in a "10 Most Eligible Women" article has pleaded guilty of two sexual assaults and faces trial on a third, charge of attempted assault David Eugene Burdette, 27, allegedly followed some of the women described in Omaha Magazine's March Issue. He pleaded guilty Thursday of assaulting one of those women, as well as a second woman who was not featured in the article. Burdette was arrested May 10 while allegedly trying to break into the apartment of a third woman, who was featured in the magazine. He was charged with attempted first-degree assault, and his trial was set to begin Friday afternoon before Douglas County District Judge Jerry Gitnick. In pre-trial hearings in August and sales in fiscal indicate that Woolworth will be a more profitable company once freed from the burden of U.S. Woolco's disappointing performance," Gibbons said. Woolworth traces its history to 1879 when Frank Woolworth opened his first 5-cent store. Shortly thereafter, be added 10-cent goods and ' changed the name to Woolworth's 5 and 10 Cent Store. By the time he died in 1919, there were more than 1,000 Woolworths on the Main Streets of America and in Great Britain. Kresge was frequently nearby, beginning in 1916 and operating 600 variety stores around the country by 1929. Gibbons told the shareholders' annual meeting last June that Woolco's U.S. operation was "the company's major weakness." HATIOHALHOTES earlier this month, Burdette told Gitnick, "I need help.' Burdette changed his plea on the sexual assault charges after Gitnick ruled that statements Burdette gave Omaha police and evidence found in a search of his home would be allowed as trial evidence. They let their fingers do the walking in jail SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. (AP) -Maximum-security prisoners awaiting trial at San Francisco County Jail have been idling away the hours by making long-distance calls billed to a private phone company, officials said. The prisoners broke numerical codes used by MCI, a Midwestern company that cuts the cost of longdistance dialing by relaying calls over their own microwave circuits, said Undersherif f Bill Davis. One source said Thursday that the prisoners have called as far as South America, a location supposedly inaccessible through the MCI system. ".They're better than Ma," said Davis. "They ought to hire these guys." MCI says the value of the calls is at -least 13,800. But others say the calls may be worth up to $100,000. 'Daley Planet foiled by caped crusader CHICAGO, ILL. (AP) - Notch another triumph for Superman. DC Comics Inc., a comic book firm that puts out Superman, and the Chicago City Colleges Board have settled an out-of-court dispute the Richard J. Daley College no longer will call its student newspaper the "Daley Planet" Henceforth, it will be known as the "Daley College Planet" The "Daily Planet" - not to be confused with "The Planet" a weekly in Metropolis in Southern Illinois is the fictional newspaper where mild-mannered Clark Kent, Superman's alter ego, works as a "mild-mannered reporter." ' DC Comics, which has the rights to the superhero character and all in his world, sued the college board in federal court in May 1981, charging the student newspaper's use of the name "Daley Planet" infringed on its rights as publisher of Superman comicbooks. The company sought only to have the student newspaper stop using the name and the term, "truth, justice and the American Way" a Superman phrase. Bess Truman leaves hospital KANSAS CITY, MO. (AP) -Former first lady Bess Truman was released Friday afternoon from Research Medical Center, where she had been hospitalized for 22 days with an intestinal ulcer. Earlier in the day, Truman's physician, Wallace Graham, had said he would not decide until Sunday when she would be able to return to her home in nearby Independence. There was no comment from the hospital about why Graham changed his mind and decided to send the 97-year-old patient home. Californians warned of 'garbage crisis' SACRAMENTO, CALIF. (AP) -California will have a "garbage crisis" by 1987, when half of the state's dumps will fill up, a state agency warns. "The garbage crisis will cost each California family hundreds, if not thousands, of dollars in the next decade," and cut yearly disposal capacity by 20 million tons, says Terry Trumbull, i head of the Solid Waste Management Board. Man acquitted in death of famed shipwright MIAMI, FLA. (AP) - A man accused of gunning down a famed shipwright who built William Buckley's yacht was acquitted on murder charges after a jury spent less than three hours pondering the case. Johnny McCree was acquitted Thursday on charges of killing Arthur Kadey at the Coral Reef Yacht Club last year. '81 Woolco incurred increasingly costly and expanding borrowings to support sales growth but failed to generate sufficient cash, flow to reduce those borrowings, Gibbons said. And, he said In June, the company decided to open no new U.S. Woolco stores in the United States beypnd those few for which legal commitments existed Friday, Gibbons said a program was being set up to help all employees affected by the move to find new employment, including other opportunities within Woolworth. A woman In the company's public relations office who did not give her name said "less than 25,000" full-time employees would be affected by the shutdown. She would not elaborate. Woolworth employs a total of 140,000 people.

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