Oakland Tribune from Oakland, California on February 20, 1936 · Page 4
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Oakland Tribune from Oakland, California · Page 4

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Oakland, California
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Thursday, February 20, 1936
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Page 4
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V. . OAKLAND TRIBUxNE, THURSDAY, FEB. ,20, 1936 :BIJF2 HIGH SCHOOLS IS PROPOSED MAN, 96, AGAIN TO BE FATHER TBf WMKF I I II L. U I II I II L- DEADLOCKED .McClymonds and -Lowell Junior Are Involved; Gradual Transfer Planned Plans for thenerging of McCly-' monds High School and Lowell Junior High School to orm a new high school in West Oakland on the Lowell site, were announced this morning by Charles W. Snook, president of the Board, of Educa- v tion. ' The announcement fol loved months of study by school officials In an endeavor to solve the problem of reconstructing McClymonds High School to conform with recommendations of the State Division of Architecture. The auditorium and one classroom unit at McClymonds have been closed since August, 1934, when the State Division of Architecture made its report to the Board of Education. .''"','. COST $330,000 ... "Reconstruction of McClymonds High School to satisfy present requirements of the State Division of Architecture would cost approxi- mately $330,000, an excessive amount In view of the needs of the district" declared Snook. "Our studies have revealed-a shift In population from the McClymonds district to other sections of the city, with a corresponding, drop in enrollment ' The LowcUk site now is considerably nearer the center of the high school population in West Oakland than ii McClymonds:" PLAN '"'OUTLINED The plan calls for a gradual transfer of students from McCly monds to Lowell. Next fall the low tenth grade will be dropped at McClymonds and added to Lowell, with the students normally entering the low seventh grade at Lowell remaining in Lafayette, Tompkins and Cole elementary schools. The high seventh grade and all of the eighth grade at Lowell ire to be absorbed later by the neigh boring elementary schools, and the remaining grades at McClymonds will be transferred, one at a time, to Lowell. A decision concerning final disposition of the McClymonds property probably would not be reached for some time, Snook indicated. ' " ' , . i,. - ., ... AtvmJmS" , i H s - i ti A, . , ill i y.ssf ; -' ...... NEW BERN. N. .C, Feb20. George Hughes, 96, and" his 28-year-old wife, who are expecting another child in May, are shown here with their first baby, born 14 months ago. The authenticated case cf the aged farther recently was printed in the jour nal of the American Medical Association. " ALBANY FETE Fund Soueht for S, F. Noise Study SAN FRANCISCO, Feb. 20. A fund of. $5000 to be used for the study of noise conditions on the streets and in the homes of San Francisco is being sought from the city today by Dr. J. C. Gelger, city health officer. Dr. Geiger made his request to City Administrator Alfred J. Cleary, who said he sees no immediate possibility of the funds being forthcoming. . The health officer pointed out that acting on orders from Mayor Rossi, he organized the medical section of the Noise Abatement Committee, but that the body never met because of lack of funds. " " TALK ON WASHINGTON John H. Kimball, secretary of the East Bay Utility District, will spenk tonight before members of Foothill Lodge No, 564, F. & A. M. at Foothill Masonic ' Hall. "The Three .Washlngtons, Soldier, Statesman and Marth will be the -subject of Kimball's talk. A regular meeting of the lodge, presided over by Ben-lamln L. Miller, will precede the tddress. . IS ALBANY, Feb. 20. A fete in honor of the birth of George Washington, a Show-Boat Minstrel, and a Leap Year .dance all will be com bined in a program by the Amer ican Legion Auxiliary to Post No. 292 next Saturday evening. Martha Schiller is general chairman of the affair, to be held: in the Albany Veterans' Building and Mabel Ryken is director of the show. Paul Weber and Craig Ellis are appearing' as soloists; Bill Feany as Captain Bill of the Show Boat, with Peter Schiller, Lee Turnbull, Frank Ryken and Don Moore, end men. The Bennett Sisters, Marian- and Peggy, will entertain with dance numbers as a feature of the program and other members will : be furnished by Dorothy Casey, Jose phine Foley, Mae Saundqrs, Luella Houser, Frank 1 Gracber, '.Animong Cook; Earl Hodgklns, Ivan Derrick, John O'Malley, Bcrnice D,o fson, Norinc Boggiano,. Louie Fouchct. ,A sailor's hornpipe will be danced tfy Harry Kane, Jimmle Sartaln, Sid1 Williams, Oliver Nelson, Pat pukes, Don Adams and. George Erickson. Other members of the committee Include Marie Walters, advertising; Luclla Houser, stage technician; Dorothy Williams, Orpha Tucker j and Josephine Foley. In the chorus which makes a total cast of 60 people are Rilla Moore, Eleanor Birks, Peggie Ford,, An-nctta Holland, Pauline Sampielro, Rose Novell, Jessie Fay', Dorothy Williams, Amelia Cook, Mildred Hawkins, Leon Fay, Bnrtle Rolph, Maude Mello, Frank Mello, Kenneth Gllnes, Kelly Bryan, William Woolworth, Harry Barrows, Anna Bell Tronoff, Rose Novell, Rose Mortara, Bud Garevich, Joe Vaughan, Si Gi.lfeather, Chartes-Robcrtson, Louie Fouchet tmd Homer Anderson. The program will begiif at 8: IS. Blind Student Injured by Hit-Run Auto in Berkeley AKRON, O., Feb. 20.-W)-T. W. Chapell, Department of Labor conciliator from Washington, took over the task of trying to break a deadlock between striking employees and the Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company today while 14,000 workers remained Idle. ' Massed pickets blocked all entrances to the three large plants and the general offices. More than 500 employees were still inside, but production was at a virtual standstill. :-- - . Labor troubles increased on an other "front as the management of the Columbia Chemical Company ordered the closing of its plant in suburban Barberton after 250 workers began a "sitdown" protest in sympathy with 50 union pipefitters who asked a wage increase of four cents an nour. Tne plant employs 900. Officials of two railroads said they were considering obtaining a Federal court injunction to prevent pickets from halting coal cars as signed to the Goodyear power plant. mi i . i 1 1 i i ine company contends xnai lay offs of tire builders, which Jed to the controversy, were justified by slack business conditions." $5000 Accounting On Loan Demanded SAN FRANCISCO,' Feb. 20. A suit demanding an ' accounting -of $5000, allegedly advanced to Ben Solomon, 37, Geary Boulevard restaurant operator, during the past eight years, was filed In Superior Court yesterday by Miss Lucille Watters, 36," of 2015 21st Avenue. Miss Watters also asked that Solomon's properties, including his cafe, be held in trust to protect her interests pending a court decision. The plaintiff alleges the -defend-J She' -described Solomon's ant secured the money as a loan j from the cafe as "large.' while he was out of a job on promise to marry her and that he has repeatedly refused to return any part of the' sum. She declared tta she returned from San Diego lasr month to find her erstwhile fiance associating with another woman. income WESTERN HISTORY TOPIC ALAMEDA, Feb. 20. Superintendent of Schools William G. Paden spoke on "Early Western History," before the Mining Engineers Club -last night . in San Francisco. Paden is well known as a speaker on early California history. X CRACKERS AND SOUPA I fP r --YOU CANT BEAT-1 U J V THAT FOR A DELICIOUS V r, , J NMBINATION . " fcv ) V " SURE I CAN ! VaiftS? PSSli' I IF YOU SERVE ' frl ( KRISPY CRACKERS . I . ;-y IT WILL TASTE . AS GOODi 1 m a mnm-' mu-m mm- n mtit m. torn he is s- A. BERKELEY, Feb. 20. A "hit-run"' driver today struck and injured Jacobus Ten Broek, 25-year- old blind University of California graduate law student, at the corner of Dana Street and A 1 1 s t o n Way. Ten Broek told i "" police. was cross Ing the i street, with hi white c an e i n front of him, when the accident occurred. The motorist left the blind man in the g u t t e r, jacobus ten broeh bleeding from a severe cut on his lip which' needed ffve stitches to bring together, and sped away from the scene of the accident. -As there were no witnesses, and because of Ten Broek's blindness, the "hit-run" driver made a "clean get-away," it was stated, although strenuous efforts were being madgl lo locate the car. . Ten Broek was picked up by fellow students, who took him to Cowell Memorial Hospital. His injuries, were confined to the cut on his lip and other minor lacerations. The injured law studrtf graduated from the uniyppsTty last year and with HarryDarbo, another blind youth, stood the highest of the ninejionor students selected by officials' of the university. He received the certificate for1-highest honors in political science. The young man has been blind since birth. Officers pointed out that if the offender is found, he will face not only felony charges of fleeing from an accident in which a person is injured, but also prosecution for violation of the State law which requires observance of the white cane carried by the blind by all California motorists. - .- Work Begun on 35th 'Avenue Storm Sewer Preparations were started today by the City Engineer for construction of the 35th Avenue storm sewer, a ,$36,000 project' sponsored by the WPA.. This sewer was advocated by the residents of that neighborhood for many years but no funds were available until now. The. sewer will run down 35th Avenue to Peralta Creek, with laterals on Harper Street, Davis Street and Brookdale- Avenue. It is expected to take away the excess storm waters of the whole district. Some 70 men will be put on the job immediately. There are 09 men now working on the Grand Avenue storm sewer, at Grand and Santa Clara Avenues. . - ; , 1 (jmmMik "r I ' lit to SEN-SEN Your brentb won't betray vou if Vou use this delirious oriental confection and bad breath corrective. Keep your breath fresh as spring with Sen-Sen. Only St at drug, confectionery and cigar stores. Sen-Sen 5 perfect blue white diamonds m solid rhothcnio-palladium or natural gojd, platinum-topped ... Regularly $65 $57.50 $5.00 A MONTH or $1.2! a wet k Mounting regularly f 40.00 . . Sale 36.00. l3Jf','? ,J M " fffT ItTNOEO WHISKEY . iL. Jt " r""""r""" IIMTI"1 ; ' " Tl "' 'V' m f " """" of diamond rings and mountings .. . 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