The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa on October 26, 1961 · Page 1
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The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa · Page 1

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Algona, Iowa
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Thursday, October 26, 1961
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By Russ Waller has just like •' woman? Pakistani camel driver, who been doing a good job of touring the US and shedding a little humor and a along the way, has few smiles- only ' one problem. His wife back 1 in Pak- time worrying, istan is all the: lest she riot appear quite" ihe same/after her hubby has viewed the chicks in the-"US. Well,, she probably, •Will hot; and-neither, will Pakistan,- for that matter But there's one thing he. didn' note on "his US .trip . . . camels ' . Y'-.;'*>•••' v'X-; ' One'of the baiter sloties pf the moment, which jias a cer.taijtpar- allel with the present iv'orld. situation too." concerns a tourist who visited a zoo in Russia* 'fife came to a cage in which a'tiger .' and a lamb were dozing. "That's an amazing example of co-existence", said the. tourist. "How on earth -is it managed?' "Oh; '..that's easy,',' said. the attendant:-''We put in a new lamb every; day" • . w-' • •• ' i . . ': ' ; '•. * * * Good officiating is a big asset in'any sport. Between Friday night's handling of the game at Hampton with Algona, and Saturday night's contest here between Garrigan and Pacelli of Austin, was as night is to day— in that order. : At Hampton we will not question the Usual offside penalties, or even the holding. But on two big plays the officials through oversight, ignorance or prejudice were horrible. Algona pulled, a perfect "sleeper" play, but the official ruled'.the wide flankei near the sidelines, was not "set" the prescribed time. He hadjbeen standing .motionless for 15 seconds before the 'play began. The s e c o n d Hampton touchdown came after the bjall carrier 'step ped out-of-bounds, according t< those nearby, then w.ent 40 yard; for the tally with Algona think ing of course the ball was dead But the officals were on the wrong-Sid! of the play. And to have the referee place the*ball a yard back of where it was downed adds insult to injury. Officials at the Garrigan-Pacelli game lost, no time in setting the game pattern, and controlling it—and they did an efficient fair job. Poor officiating can spoil a sport, and the pleasure or good competition. TA6LI * HEP *** . fat Jftome* Al*$«; ALfitoWA, IOWA, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 26, 1961 3 SECTIONS - 22 PAGES VOL. 98 - NO. 43 Coach Bump Elliot of the Univ. of Illinois • has called for "more pride throughout the state" in its football team. We are wondering just what he means— like maybe doing a better job of rounding "em up in the Pennsylvania mining area, the Michigan timberlands and the New Jersey waterfronts? * ' * » Algona's League of Women Voters 'is sponsoring an Open Forum slated for Thursday evening of next week, Nov. 2, at 8 p.m. in the High School Annex, at which both candidates for mayor of Algpna will appear, Dr. C. C. Shierk and James Whittemore. This is not a debate, but both men will have speaking time, and the audience will be invited to discuss any civic matters with the candidates as time allows. Quite an idea, too! * « * Yarn McClure, secretary of ih* Kossuth County Fair, isn't too happy about the change in date of the Iowa State Fair. When the state fair was moved up one week in 1962, it /alia exaptly in the usual week of the Kossuth County Fair. MeClure said that the only solution for the Kossuth Fair was to change the usual dates also, which means up-setting some of, .thjs. bookings for the Kossuth Fate which have become used to 'toe third week in August, year after year, * T» . »' Th« "sporty f fading" discussion has baf f rod .' us for some time, so it was good to see an article the other day on the subject. The article in the Atlantic Monthly says it is not how fast we read, but how well we read In other words what we really absorb. It adds that once we are happy with the quality of the reading we can turn our atten tion to how fast we, can reed. The best readers, however, those who do the best job of getting the meaning from what they read also read quickly. So, this : brings us to a •. little more serious last line for the week. ' i To Give 83,000 Gash In Trade Expansion Campaign Of Papers A Trade Expansion Campaign, with $3,000 cash in seven grand prizes, is announced this Week by the Algona Newspapers. The campaign is based on new and renewal subscriptions to he two-Algona papers, the Algond Upper Des Moines and "Kossuth -ounty Advance, and the grand cash winners will be determined >y votes. • ..' ' - ; . "', •"•• -. • , ;• New subscriptions and rehewajs bring Votes jto the'contest* qnfs, and those with, the most votes will receive the grand prizes which qre,$800 for first; $500'for second, $300 for third, $200 for fourth, and other prizes of $100, $75"emd '$50. All workers in the cqmpaign will receive a minimum of 20% in commissions even though they might not win a grand prize. :. . .The campaign starts next Monday, Oct. 30, and will continue for fjye weeks to about Dec. 5. • . ,•' Entries by contestants are now being received,and there is a full^ page announcement with complete details elsewhere in today's Upper Des Moines. The campaign headquarters office, for the first few weeks, is located in the Upper'Des Moines office, where a special telephone with the number Cypress 4-3537 has been mqde available for'contestants, or those wishing information on the contest. •'.'.-' • The Marion Circulation Co. of Marion, Iowa, of which. Walter Relnsch is manager, is conducting the Campaign. It is the first circulation.trade extension campaign in the history of the local papers and will add to;,the-already dbminant coverage of the area by the local papers. , /' ; There is place in the cqmpaign for 14 workers interested in earning a guaranteed income of-,$ 100 for the first 10 days work Workers who then qualify in the first 10 days earn the right to compete for the remaining grand awards totaling $2,000, and are assured of their 20% commission even if they do not get into the grand prize bracket. ; Any man or woman is eligible to enter. There is no entrance fee^and supplies are furnished the contestants. Anyone desiring more information, or to enter, may contqct Reinsert at the Upper Des Moines, or also enter by sending in he coupon in the page ad, in .wjiich. case they will be contacted sy the Marion Circulation.Co. with full details. _ It is hoped that there will be contestants entered from north and south, east and west, as there is no limit to the area in which a candidate may work./Subscription prices remain the same dur- ng the contest, but theVe is a combination rate offered of $9 for two years for both, newspapers, a" saving of $1 to subscribers;' during the contest. ' ; ' .-.,p; In Wisconsin Funeral services for P. J. (Pete) Waldron, 62, former well- known Algonan. were held Mon day at Windom,. Minn. Buria s was at Jackson, Minn. Mr. Waldron, who traveled foi an oil company here for many years, then operated the Chromr Cafe for 12 years preceding 1950. died of a heart attack in his room at a Janesville, Wise! motel Wednesday. Oct. 18. He had recently sold his cafe at Windom and was traveling to Elmhursi. 111.'- to visit his daughter, Dorinii Jean (Mrs Robert Lichty), at the time of his death. Born April 6, 1899, at Streator. 11., Mr. Waldron. his wife, Glalys and son and daughter moved o Algona in 1937, then after his children graduated from high school here, Mr. and Mrs. Waldron moved to Windom where he operated a cafe. Since moving to Windom. he had visited Algona 'many times, including a visit within a week before hir death. He owns property here. Due t<| ill health, he planned to move to Arizona to live and .was .going to visit the daughter before traveling west. The children, Donna Jean and Gary, now a captain in the air force at Omaha, a brother. Harold, Heron Lake, Minn., e sister, Louella, also of Heron LaKe* and four grandchildren survive. Halloween Party Algona Lions Club will be host again at Ihe annual Halloween Party for young- slers, nexl Tuesday evening. Oct. 31, starting with a parade al 7:30 -.p.m. lo form al Ihe corner of Slate & Harlan streets. The parade will go down Slate Slreel lo Ihe old Athletic Field; il will not proceed through the main business area. At Ihe Athletic Field there will be a judging of costumes in the usual brackets as for previous years with prizes lo be awarded in all age groups. Games will also be played, and hoi dogs, doughnuts, coffee and milk will be served following Ihe judging. 1 All children and Iheir parents are invited. Ella Dolan, I Succumbs Here; Wesley Rites Wesley — Mrs. Ella bolaft, 9*5 died Monday morning. Oct.' 23 at Good Samaritan Home, Algona, where she had been a 'patient one year. She had Jived many years with her "daughter Mrs. George Vitzthum, and |am- ily. Mrs. Dolan was born June/2. 1.866 to Mr. and Mrs'. James.Hick- man,' at Monroe, Wise. ' '•* '. ; Mrs, Dolan is survived by two sons. Ferris of . Seattle, Wash, and Floyd of Alexander,' S. D.' and a daughter, Mrs. Vitzthuir of Wesley; 11 grandchildren, 54 great-grandchildren and two great-great-grandchildren. . Funeral, services -Were held. Wednesday afternoon^' in the Evangelical- Free church with Rev. Jones officiating,. and burial in Evergreen cenieitery. Casket bearers were six grarid-t sons, Gaylon, Dennis, Tom, George, Jack and Mike Vitzthum. Blake Funeral. Home was in charge, of \ arrangements. Knife, Gun Involved in Gong Argument On Tuesday Night Youth In Jail After Pending Battle Halted A HS Homecoming Queens CornTheftls Charged, Three R0v. Schultz Of Burt Resigns — Rev. Arthur L. Schultz, team tewly ' OK own -•«»«*. fiJ thii lear ^T *W™9 ;..TWZ''9 l«w through i pl«w learning .TWZ''9 S W» ! P ma- ! ^ r«dlng..' pastor of St. John's Lutherar church, has accepted a call to become pastor of Our Savior Lutheran church at Red Oak and Mount Calvary Lutheran church at Villisca. He has been at Burt for four years. The churches at Red Oak and ViUisca are considered mission phiirches, the Red Oak church being just recently established A definite date has not been set for the transfer. It will be during the month 'of November. Do note $1,§0Q A total of $J,500 has been pro- 4ed this year by the Kossuth Cpunty T,B and Health Ass'n foi research, jn Iowa and other uses. C. B, Mwtagh. president of the county group, states. Miss Frerichs Funeral Monday At Titonka Funeral services for Charlotte C. Frerjchs, 89, were held Mon7 day at the Good Hope Lutheran church, Titonka, Rev. B. H. Sch> werin officiating. Burial was in Graceland Cemetery at Buffalo Center. Barnes Funeral Home was in qharge of arrangements, Miss Frerichs was born Oct. H 1872 in Germany and died Oct. 2) at the home of Etta and Maude Stecker, Titonka, where she ha? been making her home. She is survived by several' nieces and nephews in the But- falo Center and Titonka area. Allan Rector; 27, and Duant Risk, 17, -Elmore, ; Minn.V wetr bound over to district courti;(hejje Friday morning following a* ; prg- liminary hearing on charges",; p; stealing shelled corn: The hearing was, held • hi' Justice vDelfe Welter's court and bond was* set at $2,500 for each man. Bond was not furnished.. , v, ..Risk's wife; Cardl,' was arrfst- ed here Friday evening and 'was also bound over following a pre- ihn,inary.- hearing, in. Mjss.xWeUeck court the next day. She was taken to the jail at Fort Dodge/ when her bond of $2,500 was not posted. The men are in jail here. The charges wem a , result of the 'theft of 143 bushels of corn from a farm owned by Mrs Louis Corhus and farmed by her son, Laverne. The farm is located 3% miles southeast of Elmore in Kossuth county and the theft allegedly took place Mon day night, Oct. 16. \ Rector and Risk 'were appre hended by -the Blue .Earth. Minn sheriff following investigation o; the theft by Sheriff Ralph Lind; horst Value of the corn war more than '$100. based on a 9f cent per bushel price. Schattschneider Infant Dies; Rites Held Here Graveside . rites for Ted Alaq Schattschneider, infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Gene Schattschneider, Algona. were held Friday at Eastlawn Memorial Gardens with Rev. G. J. C. Gerike. Trinity Lutheran pastor, officiating. The baby was born prematurely Thursday, Oct. 19, at St. Ann hospital and died soon after birth. Besides his parents, survivors include a sister, Sally, two brothers, Kyle and Terry, his maternal grandparents, Mr. and Mrs t ',9?, e j* f lhe four comelv misses shown here will" be rrow;ned Algona High School Homecoming Queen for 1961 during ceremonies' at the Algona-Clear Lake football game tomorrow (Friday) night at the fairgrounds. ' The gals, all. seniors, are, left to right, Sue Schuftz,' Kathy'Feaster, Pam Gabrielson and Patty Peterson. -.•/.,,' ,; , ••*—' . * —""*»'. . ——«»"-»i * **t*i ^ui~u.iv..i£)uii cuiu JL aii.v irciciaujj They were nominated for the honor by members of the AHS football squad last Thursday afternoon The winner will be determined this week by a vote of the student bodviand thp now Queen will h named and crowned at 7:30 p.m. She will then;reign pvep all Homecoming activities, which will be kicked off with a bonfire and snake dance Thursday night. ;There. will also be -a Homecoming parade Friday at 3:30 p.m., complete, with class and organization floats, Queen candidates and bands. A dance in the hieh school gym will follow the game. (UDM Newspoto — Engraving) County To Protest Tax Valuation Boost Ordered Ned Hardgrove, and paternal grandmother, Mrs. Frank Schattschneider, all of Algona. McCullough Funeral Chapel was in charge of arrangements; Kossuth vCounty a.a^d most oiher counties 'in' North Iowa as well—plan to file protests with tlie Iowa Stale Tax Commission on the tentative valuation increase ordered for the county last week. ' If the stale order becomes effective, ihe entire work of figuring valuations for 1961 on taxes payable in 1962 will have to be done over for Kossuth County. County : Assessor Leo Irij- merfall said he attended a meeting of Norlh Iowa'asses-' sors at Garner Monday, and a joint protest was being planned. ." , An individual protest from Kossuth county will also be filed today, he said. On a protest, a hearing must be granted by the stale body; If the stale order became effective, it would mean a revaluation with a 5 percent increase for all Kossulh county agricultural lands, and buildings, and all real estate property in the City of Algona. New Officers For Community Club At Lakota The Lakota Community Club elected Will Hanken its president at a recent meeting. Other new officers are Wilson Brack, vice president, and John Ukena, secretary-treasurer. Retiring officers are Don Boyd jresident, Carl Gerzema, vice >resident, and Paul Kobkler, sec- •etary-treasurer. .tt would riot increase-, valuations-in outlyipg county 'towns except for agricultural lands within lown limits of 10 acres or more'in size. Nearly every ^one of Ihe Iowa counties receiving similar notices is filing a protest. Some have called Ihe order of ihe Stale Tax Commission illegal. Lakota Golden Wedding Special Movies Here, Frl, Sat, A special Halloween Movit Matinee has been set for Saturday afternoon, at the Algonr Theatre, with nine prizes to bt awarded for the best costumes There will be three awards in each of three age groups, 2 to § 6 to 9, and 10 and older. On the screen there will be a show which includes 10 cartoons and tyyo "Three Stooge" comedies, manager Ray Langfitt announces. Friday night there will also be a double feature midnight show starting at 11 p.m. Mr. and Mrs. E. H. Cushman, above, Lakota, observed Iheir Golden Wedding aiwuversary on Sunday, October 22, with an open house at the Lakota Presbyterian church in Lakota. A short program was held at 2:30 p.m. A host of friends and relatives dropped in to pay their respects. Kossuth Has • v •» 54 Students At State U*l Iowa Cily — Fifty four young people from Kossuth County arc among this fall's record-break- ng enrollment of 11,701 students at The State University of Iowa. legistrar Donald M. Rhoades reported yesterday. For the second consecutive ear enrollment on the Iowa City campus exceeds the previous all-time high of 10,886 stu- lents. reached in 1948 when iVorld War II veteran enrollment ivas at its peak across the nation The 1948 "record" was firsl broken in the fall of 1960 when SUI enrollment reached 11,113 The Kossuth County student roster at S.U.I, follows: ALGONA — Harold M. Amfahr, Kathryn Bay, Janice Bode Clifford Esser, Jerry Ferris, Howard Funk, David Hutchins Cheryl Immerfall, Beverly James, Evelyn James, John Kline. Robert Levier. June McEnroe. James McMahon, David Passmore, John Platt, William Sigsbee, Linda Tague, John Vipond Denni? Waller, Pamela Waller. Bancroft — James Dolan, Richard Goche, Thomas Sheridan. Burt — Norman Carlson, Jay Hoppus, David Rasmussen, Sheryl Smith, Oliver Steward anc' John Wilson. Corwith — Charles Cram. David Hauswirth, James Thorn. Fenton — Ray Cornelius, Lynn Ruske. Lakota — Allen Smith, Richard Smith. Ledyard — Arthur Haag. Lone Rock — Craig Blanchard Nancy Fischer, Jerald Jensen Jerald Newbrough. LuVerne — Kenneth F. Wilhelm. Rockwell City — Clara Hansen. Swea City — Richard Farland Donald Johnson, Ronald Linde Marianne Martin, Ronald Peterson. Titonka — Sandra Gartner. Wesley — Paul Pfeffer, Judith Pfeffer. Whittemore — .John Duffy, Donald Meyer, Two Algona policemen. Jim Voigt and Eppo Bulten, broke up a potential teenage gang war here at 10:32 p.m. Tuesday arid as a result a 20-year old Manson youth was lodged in the local jail It is probable he will be charged with carrying a concealed weapon and that the other 15 (ranging in age from 17-20 years of age) will be charged with disturbing the peace as a result of the near-altercation. t * » » Bulletin! A hearing was held in Mayor C. C. Shierk's court late Wednesday 'afternoon and Ewing paid $100" and costs for assault due to mitigating circumstances, A formal charge had not been" filed until Ihe hearing. The'' weapons will be held by of-, ficials and disposed of by the court. * * * The youth who was jailed, John David Ewing, was in possession of a switch-blade knifa and an empty nine-shot .22 cali- Policeman Ernie Hutchison is shown in Ihe above photo holding Ihe pistol and large 'switch-blade knife allegedly burnished during a near-bai- lie among 16 youths here Tuesday night. The owner of the switch-blade was in jail here Wednesday and it is possible he will be charged with carrying a concealed weapon. Man Fined For Petty Larceny; Took Used Oil An Omaha, Ncbr., truck driver, Ray Peeler, was charged with petty larceny in Mayor C. C Shierk's court here Tuesday night and paid a $25 fine and costs after he was caught taking used oil from a large container behind the Schultz Bros, garage here earlier in the evening. According to Schullz Bros., it was the third time someone has been caught taking oil from their premises. Peeler works for a firm that collects used oil from service stations for some use 01 other—and his pick-up here wa; without first asking permission or for the right to purchase thr oil. In other mayor's court cases this week, Albin F. Kayser, Lakota, paid $10, Thomas L. Studer, Wesley, $10, Richard J. Thul, Bode, $10, John R. Dutton, Algona, $10, and Dennis E. Drummer, Livermore, $9, speeding; Harold Prather, Graettinger, $10. improper registration; Roger L Fox, LuVerne, $10, disturbing the peace; and Albin F. Kayser, Lakota, $5, expired license. Court costs were assessed in addition to fines. TB Meeting A county meeting of the TB Association will be held Saturday noon, Oct. 28, at Van's Cafe here. All town and township chairmen for Christmas Seals ber pistol in a holster during the argument, according to hig statement to local police offii cers. All of the others were re- .leased from custody after being interrogated at the city polico station. %; ' The run-in between two groups, one including 10 boys from Algona and one 'from Wesley and; the, other including the Manson. youth and four others .from.,Humboldt, Ft. Dodge .and Dakota City, occurred in, the vicinity of the Elk Cleaners on East Call street here. Voigt discovered' the .16 boyl having an argument as he mad< his rounds in the city polico car. According lo a story patched together after the incident, ihe groups were going lo meel al ihe city parking lol and have a battle royal. They didn'l get that far. The three cars were parked north of the cleaning establishment and some healed talk followed. When the Manson youth made it known he had a switch-blade available, most of the fight went out of the opposition and the police made the pick-up. A couple of the youths in the Ft. Dodge car tossed a few pop bottles sometime during the discussion but no one got hurt. The Manson youth reportedly told local officers that he carried the knife everywhere—even to church on Sunday—and according to policemen here, the youth's parents knew he had the knife, which is illegal to carry concealed, due to the fact the blade is more than three inches long. It is not known where he got the pistol, but it is illegal for anyone to sell • (or to give to) a pistol to a person under 21 years of age. The owner of such a store, or the person giving such a gift can also get into a lot of trouble. Carrying a concealed weapon is a felony—and can result in a $1,000 fine, and/or five years im» prisonment on conviction. First offense sometimes is lighter, carrying a three-month sentence in the county jail. Possible charges in the matter are being considered by County Attorney Gordon Winkel. Winkel was out of town Wednesday. Fortunately, in this case, there was no bloodshed. ft* ^ 2 Hurt'Playing Football At Bancroft Sunday Bancroft — Two local boys suffered injuries while playing football here Sunday. They are James Hauptman, 14, son of Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Hauptman and a freshman at St. John's high school, and Terry Dixon, son of Mr. and Mrs. Orville Dixon, a student at Swea City high school. Young Hauptman suffered a shoulder separation at the St. John's school grounds and was. treated by a local doctor. His arm will be in a sling for several days. The Dixon boy injured the muscles in his back and was unable to attend school for several days.

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