The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa on August 1, 1967 · Page 11
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The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa · Page 11

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Algona, Iowa
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Tuesday, August 1, 1967
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Page 11
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• DEVELOPMENTS t FROMDEVALOIS FARM PAGE W»tt*»**M*9aW3^*tt®^^ 6-Algona (la.) Upper Des Moines Tuesday, August 1, 1967 MEMOS FROM MARGARET BY MARGARET PRATT Extension Home Economist How To Care For Durable Press: Durable press sometimes called "permanent press" is available in apparel for men, women and children. Many household items such as sheets, pillowcases, napkins, tablecloths, bedspreads and curtains carry "no iron" labels. With a widening array of these items, it is important to know how to take care of them. Rule 1. Avoid getting fabric very soiled. Some synthetic fibers used in durable press items absorb and hold onto oily soil, thus if s best to wash often and avoid soil build-up. Pretreat heavily soiled areas or grease spots by rubbing in a detergent paste or liquid detergent before washing. Test first on an inconspicuous area and make sure that all items treated this way resist fading. Lf color is fast, let the detergent remain on the fabric for 10 to 15 minutes. On color- sensitive fabrics, remove greasy soil witli a dry cleaning solution, then wash by hand with a mild soap or detergent. Wash and rinse quickly, roll loosely in a towel, and hang to dry. Rule 2. Wash in small loads sort first of course - and use the right laundry products. Save the hang tags or labels that give laundry instructions. A recipe box in the laundry is a good place to file them. A description of the garment they apply to may be written on each tag or attached to it. Consult the record whenever necessary. Bleaching with clorox yellows some fabrics. Read and follow manufacturer's directions. Fabric softeners reduce static electricity, makes garments feel softer, and often help prevent wrinkling. Rule 3. Use your laundry equipment correctly, advise USDA's electrification specialists. Warm or cool water and short wash, rinse and spin cycles are important. Use a Wash and Wear or Durable Press cycle if available, otherwise adjust the controls by hand. The heat and tumbling action of an automatic dryer relaxes fibers and removes wrinkles that occur during wearing and washing. Turn the heat off for the last 10 minutes of the drying cycle. As soon as the tumbling stops, remove and hand garments and curtains. Neatly fold items like sheets, tablecloths and napkins. Be Right The purpose of the painting, the condition of the surface and the expected exposure all combine to dictate the selection of the right paint. Consequently, these factors should be related to your local reputable paint dealer and he will help you choose the right paint for every home painting project. HOW WILL YOU HANDLE ALL OF THOSE STALKS? *• The best way to handle the tangled mass of tough heavy hybrid stalks is a Brady flail shredder. It shreds your stalks, makes plowing easier raster, better . . . knocks out most of your corn borers too You can even pull a tandem disc behind a Brady and be ready for minimum tillage. Its a great labor-saver ... and excellent for clipping pastures and idle acres. *"Jwo, three, and four-row available. See them today at BUSCHER BROS. IMPLEMENT 1015 NORTH MAIN ALGONA BRADY 4-ROW CHOPPER k#************* {COMMENTS FROM | CUMBERLAND f -^ 4 \ : " 'V^ BY GALEN DeVALOIS Kossuth Extension Director Question from West Bend — What is this "disease" my soybeans have that puckers the leaves and makes the leaf surface all bubbly ? Answer - That "disease" is usually caused by spray drift from a nearby cornfield, from chemical carry-over from last year's corn or a remote possibility it could be a disease called soybean mosaic. Here is how to attempt to tell the difference, although it may be impossible to be sure. They look the same, but have other differences. If the damaged leaves are only along the edge of a cornfield, I would suspect 2,4D drift. In many cases only the upper leaves show damage (the upper leaves seem to protect the lower leaves if the drift is light). New leaves come out in a normal manner usually and the beans look better as time passes. If the damaged beans are in short row stretches anywhere in the field I would ask if the rows are running the same direction as the corn did last year and if something like Randox T had been banded on last year's corn. This usually does not carry over, but an over-application of the chemical, dry winter or doubling up on end rows can cause carry-over on some occasions. One suggestion is to run the bean rows a different direction in the field if there is a possibility of carry-over from a chemical banded the year before. A third possibility, but not a great one, is soybean mosaic disease. Of the many samples we have checked and sent in, it has never been identified as this disease. The specialists say that if it is Mosaic the condition will spread and become worse rather than improve as the drift damage does. - o - Cattle feeders are constantly looking for ways to be able to buy cattle that perform and gain faster. One thing that helps spot good performance cattle is buying from breeders that have performance tested calves for sale. However, most Kossuth feeders tell me they do not know where to locate performance tested cattle. While we are not in the business of advertising, we do have a list of breeders in Montana who have performance tested calves. Stop in at the office, phone or drop us a card if you would like this list. Again, remember that just because a calf is performance tested doesn't make the calf any better. Compare his performance and buy above average performance calves, BY DENNIS CUMBERLAND Extension Assistant This past week has been a busy one for both the boys and girls in 4-H. Monday night the boys' demonstration contest was held at the Extension office. Twelve teams participated by giving some very good demonstrations. Each year teams are picked to attend both State Fair and the Clay County Fair. Daryl and Douglas Nyman from the Seneca Progressive Farmers, near Bancroft, were named as top team and will attend the State Fair. Their demonstration was concerned with Civil Defense and supplying a fallout shelter. Dean Banwart of the Garfield Hustlers near West Bend was named as the one to attend Clay County Fair. A top Junior team was picked to demonstrate at the Kossuth County Fair. They were Duane Boehm and Lloyd Eichenberger of the Aggressive Lads, near Lakota. All these demonstrations can be seen at the Kossuth County Fair in the Armory on Wednesday, August 17 at 2 p. m. The girls' contest was held Thursday in the First Methodist church in Algona. Twenty teams participated in the contest. Two demonstrations were selected to attend State Fair. Linda Kracht of near Lone Rock was named in the special activity group and Patrice Bode of near Algona was named to the home economics division. Linda Nitchals and Sue Dodds, Algona, will demonstrate at the Dairy Cattle Congress later this year and Becky Tielebein, Algona, will demonstrate at the Clay County Fair at Spencer. There was also two junior teams named to demonstrate at the Kossuth County Fair. Jean Besch and RocheUe Arend of Whittemore and Debbie Studer and Susan McGuire of Algona will demonstrate in the Armory on Wednesday, August 17, as well as the other top teams named. We encourage a good attendance at the demonstrations at the Fair. This is one of the most educational events in the 4-H program. NOW "two-way combination" with "three-way action" in our Pig Starter with NEW TYLAN+ ! (Tylosin, Elanco) The great new "two-way combination" that gives you "three-way action" against dangerous and costly diseases, and helps booit gains, Increase feed efficiency, Ask us for the Whittemore Co-op Elevator HOBARTON BRANCH EN CO-OP and * ~ **%* Golden Sun Feed For top performance CO-OP saaolme, fuel oil, oils and lubricant. TELEPHONE 285 - 56H

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