The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa on June 13, 1967 · Page 10
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The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa · Page 10

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Algona, Iowa
Issue Date:
Tuesday, June 13, 1967
Page:
Page 10
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4—Algona (la.) Upper Des Moines Tuesday, June 13, 1967 . .by Evelyn What is so rare as a day in June? I should remember who wrote that years ago and it has been quoted so many times, but it doesn't matter so much who wrote it; June DOES exist and we have some beautiful days, Uiis being one of them. So, to the woods, take plenty of picnic food and enjoy nature. That reminds me of an English class many years ago and we were studying Wordsworth. Daisy Laird was called upon to tell what she could about him. Now Daisy was not too well prepared, but she did come up with, "Well, he liked nature and liked to be with it." True, but it hardly covered the subject as the teacher wanted and all of us got a laugh out of it. I recall a time when I was on a spot, too. Miss McCoy asked us to be able to answer roll call with a quotation from Shakespeare. I had forgotten to look one up, and many were frantically going through their books enroute from assembly room to her class room on first floor. My quotation was "To be or not to be, that is the question." I remember Miss McCoy tried to conceal a smile, but I got by, and that was the main thing. I was i.s hard- pressed as Daisy. * * * Another time in political economy class I sat beside "Shortie" Lowe. She didn't know the answer to Mr. Waters' question and I whispered it to her. She didn't get it, so stepped a little closer to me. I whispered it again and she still didn't hear me. Mr. Waters said in his dry manner, "What's the matter Miss Lowe? Can't you hear her?" When asked if she had looked at the book she replied meekly, "Yes." His answer was, "Yes, the outside cover probably." * * * I had scarcely finished my suggestion that car "graveyards" be done away with by digging huge holes and burying them in a deep pit when out came an article with about the same idea. And I agree with Russ. Why not have a pretty park where the old dump is? Look around and you'll see some very unsightly places-residential areas, one not too far from Good Samaritan. The conditions inside a house can sometimes be judged by the outside. I remember years ago my mother liked to have a small garden. She would take stakes, long string and sow long, straight rows of radishes, onions, lettuce and tomatoes. A woman who had not met mother at that time did meet her years afterward and said, "I always admired your garden. The rows so neat, never a weed, and I said to myself, Pll bet that woman is a good housekeeper." It happened to be Austie Pelleymounter, sister of Mary who several years afterward married mother's brother Frank Henderson. Austie told mother about her deductions and they were true, for mother was a very good housekeeper. There are some farms I could mention that are a delight to the eyes- one in particular enroute to Fort Dodge, and another not far from Ji'-ison City. And then there are virue one just aches to have cleared up. I know of at least two places here In Algona that I'd love to see the owners make spic and span. It must be aggravating to live next to such places when ones own place is neat. I know one woman who moved to get away from an unsightly place where the children were allowed to toss tilings onto her lawn with never a reprimand from the parents. "Algona-the Friendly City" to which let's add "Algona, the Beautifully Neat City." * * * That was a very good picture of Rev. and Mrs. Earl Burgess of Sac City who recently celebrated a wedding anniversary. It has been a good many years since they were here and he was pastor of the Methodist church, but I remember so well the resume Mrs. Wesley Dutton gave of the conference meeting she attended. We knew he had been assigned to our church but it took her to put on the finishing touch by saying, "He will be awfully easy to look at." Coming from rJemure little Mrs. Dutton, we women had a hearty laugh. And she sure knew what she was talking about. He was and is a fine looking man. * * * The Sherman Littles are probably home by this time as they go via jet. A card from them a few days ago came from Washington, D.C. and read "Just two more days and then home again. We had a marvelous time at the Expo 67 six days, five in New York and three days here (Washington)." * * * It is a good thing in a way that Mrs. Gilles, a resident here at Good Samaritan Home does not know of the death of Aletha Ecklund of Swea City. She thought so much of her and they were neighbors in Swea City. It seems a little unfair that reporters are open to—well let's call a spade a spade - insults. When I began this work Russ said, "You will have to develop the hide of an elephant." On a few occasions I have found it true — but for the most part, everyone has been very nice and it has been a pleasure to talk with them. However, the other day I was given a harsh treatment, undeserved. The woman called and said this is — and spelled the last name. I repeated the spelling for it was one I had not heard before nor had on my calling list. I took for granted it was a newcomer and I was delighted that she was being helpful. She said where she was going, then some confusion in the hall left me uncertain. She had hung up and the reason I didn't hear clearly was due to the confusion. I tried to find her name as given me, but it was not listed. I asked the operator if such a name was listed, thinking it was a family too new to be listed. No such name. Nor did I find it byasking at the post office. So I did the best I knew about the item. The paper came out, then came the blast! "Didn't I know her name was — f "No," I answered, as I have never, to my knowledge, met the woman, but had she given me her right surname, I would recognize that. Her surname was NOT mentioned in our conversation about her Memorial Day plans. It is so odd I couldn't mistake it for the one she gave me. I think she thoughtlessly gave me the name of the person she was to visit— but I am left dubbed as the moron who can't write news. Well, I've been doing it for a good many years, and there are so many on my calling list I shall not miss hers in the least. She has been described to me as "temperamental." Russ, you know whereof you warned years ago, and I am immune, thanks to your reasonable and good advice. * * * I had Mrs. Melvln Trout and her little grandson Rodney Lee Boyer of Drakesville as callers Sunday. The Trouts were at one time Call State Park custodians and were transferred to Drakesville near Ottumwa. I asked how often the custodians are moved. She said, "About five or six years." She and ministers and families have much in common. * * * I forgot to say the fiftieth wedding anniversary of Rev. and Mrs. Earl Burgess is to be observed June 18 at Sac City. All friends of the couple are invited. "Hey, Ford Buyer: for about $ 22S a month more than a Ford LTD, I can put you in a * full-sized '67 CHRYSLER!' "Right now, a 1967 Chrysler Newport 2-door Hardtop is priced approximately $2.39 a month moret than a comparably equipped 1967 Ford LTD. And that means with power steering, power brakes, radio, heater, and automatic transmission. When it's only a matter of a few dollars a month, don't settle for a small line. See us and move up to a full-size '67 Chrysler. Today. tBased on a comparison of Manufacturers' Suggested Retail Price for a Ford LTD 2-doop Hardtop and a Chrysler Newport 2-door Hardtop, both equipped with V-8 engine, automatic transmission, power steering, power brakes, radio, and heater. Comparisons are based on one-third down and 36 monthly payments excluding other optional equipment (such as whitewall tires, deluxe wheel covers) and destination charges, state and local taxes, interest, insurance and licensing fees. CHRYSLER'67 CHRYSLER MOTORS CORPORATION Percival Motors, Inc. • 800 S. Phillips, Algona, Iowa

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