The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on April 10, 1946 · Page 4
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April 10, 1946

The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 4

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Blytheville, Arkansas
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Wednesday, April 10, 1946
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CAGE FOUX BLYTHEVILLE (ARK.) COUKIEH NEWS WEDNESDAY, APRIL 10, 19.10 THE BLYTHEVim COURIER NEWS B. W. HADOB. Wklfea* Wltaec Oo, N*v oott. AUtote, Mfcmptfc. ; HH"**!"^**' Totk. ChkMO, I PuhatfUd fmj AftMPOOP «B»I* ibtond u weood d»» ••*«« k( Uw po*- oOldi at Blytberilto. ArkMMM. on«r M* at Ooo- , October •. WIT. Bcrted bj tb« tlnlWd BOBSCRIPTION RATM By center In the dty d BfrttMrUU or aDj wbuibui torn what carrier utrrtot it maintained. 20c per week, or We per month. By mill, within a ruBui at 40 nUM. M*» per year, 12.00 for *« Booth*. »1« 'or ttuee month*; oy- mall outaUte M mil* MO*. *10jM p*r rear oayable' to adranoa. Enlistments Curtailed Congress has passed a series of cx- cc'ediiigly generous bills which make the American enlisted man uiique.s- tionably the best-paid, best-clothed, best-housed, and best-cared-fov soldier in history. Government officials have pleaded for volunteers on the basis of natibriaj need and of personal advantage. The press and the radio have skillfully beaten the drums for enlistments. Unsettled and uncomfortable conditions in civilian America have provided a very real incentive. Yet enlistments have not come, and are not now coming, in anything approaching the required proportion. There must, of course, be a reason. The current Lichfield, England, Army court-martial revelation perhaps provides, a good idea as to just what that reason is. It gives flesh-and-blood renl- ity to the "caste system," which former enlisted men repeatedly cite as the cause- for their nauseous reaction to nil thing's military. An Army captain has resigned as assistant prosecutor of the Lichfield trial, charging that the case has been "flagrantly mishandled" in an apparently deliberate attempt to acquit high- ranking officers while convicting enlisted men and junior officers. The case itself is most interesting— and enlightening. The defendants stand . accused.of participating in a concerted policy .of ^brutally mistreating American prisoners ^confined at the Lichfield Reinforcement Depot. 'i'i'This stor^us neither new'nor pux- zHiig'to discharged soldiers. Rightly or wrongly, they emerged from wartime service with an impression that extralegal protection is a cherished privilege .ofc-officers. And, having seen rough £realo)ent of GI prisoners the accepted iJcacficdVat-many Army posts, they feel .£Jiat;.ihsCl4chfieId guardhouse procedure as';in no sense revolutionary, s-a; revelation, and a practice, may''well be brought to the at- t'"einiy of Gen. ' Dwight D. owQ'r, Jaiif .also of the vigorously fflbJMzecT5j6]ard' ; <jf former officers and •%rhMerV-rn'en~hb\v' concerning itself with •suggestions for "democratization" of •(.he Army. For the United States does desperately need a large Army at present. It can reasonably expect ils youth to sacrifice personal comfort and convenience—yes, even personal safety—in order to implement the national gains so recently purchased, with blood and tears, on the battlefields of the world. But it cannot expect young men brought up in (lie American heritage of equality before the law and of protection for the rights of even Ihc most burdened cviminul voluntarily to surrender that heritage by enlisting in a military organization which guarantees them neither. Opportunist View* of GtltetA te VUm trtan •! KlHlrMi I Help for Crippled Children You [ire likely soon lo get. if you haven't nlrcnily received It, n letter from tlio Arkansas Association for the Crippled. The letter will ask you lo buy the dollar's worth or more of Easier Seals enclosed. You could hardly .spend a dollar to better purpose. Koi with the money thus obtiilncd, tho iifsoclollon is doing n splendid Christ Iftn work lor our physically handicapped children. It U bringing Into their lives a springtime, an Easier, of hope by giving them n better chance in life. The ns.socialton lins no other funds than the money it eels from these Buster Seals. It Is stretching llicso dollars over .1 far-rcnchliii? scivice. Every dollar Invested In the seals becomes a dcllur of kindness and mercy, devoted to the cause of ••helping others to help themselves." The war showed that our handicapped people arc ambitions, and that many ot them have natural skills. Tlicy went into war plants, and performed vital tasks. Their fine war record did much to advance,.tlic program lor wider alii to crippled children. It proved Ihnt. aside from the Immune considerations, (here is ability in these little unfortunates well worth siwiny. They have a right to as normal a life as can be. opened lo them. A dollar spent foi that purpose isn't a charily dollar. It's a dollar invested In one of Ihe greatest enlcrprlscs in the world— restoring hnndiciippcd lives lo usefulness and happiness. Every such life enriches the community. And yon never know where this work of • mercy will touch and inspire genius. Many of ,the world's greatest figures have hud some pliy- •' sical Impairment. Among them were blind Mil's ton. the poet; Slemmcts; the electrical wizard, n hunchback; Robert Louis Stevenson, who "wrote like an angel'\ and whoso life was dogged by tuberculosis; and the laic President Hooscvcll, crippled by infantile paralysis--just to mention a lew. There may huvc been many more such potential geniuses who lacked the fire to overcome Ihcir handicaps without help. All crippled children, though their lives may be the humblest, licvo n claim on us. Let's not forget these little people, when a dollnr for Easter Seals will help lo do so much for them. ARKANSAS DEMOCRAT. * IN HOLLYWOOD;: KV liKKKINF. JOHNSON NKA Staff Correspondent HOLLYWOOD, April 10. (NEA) —The housing shortage has hit Lnralnc Day and hubby Ray llen- drlcks in reverse. They now have seven people, unable to find homes, living with them.. .Michelc Morgan is Hollywood bound after making a movie in Paris.. .The Defense of f^iv-'rcnce Tlerney Club in Hollywood is predicting that there will l>e no more fisticuffs. Tlcrney's father, a police officer hi Brooklyn, has arrived for some icart-to-hcart talks with his son. ..Ann Miller and hubby Reese Milner are shopping around for 5200,000 bridal home in Beverly Oscar Levant's blonde ex-wife, Barbara Woodall, Is making her 'ilm debut In Columbia's "The Ile- .urn of Rusty.".. .Steve Crane, Lana Turner's ex-, and M-CS-M eyeful Lila Leeds have discovered each other Not so long ago she was one of the prettier cigarel girls at Giro's.... .You're about to sec a terrific advertising campaign on nita Hayworth's ne»- movie, "Gikia." "KLMEIl T11K GRKAT," JK. Joe E. Brown's Joe U, is out of the Army and working as malinger of the Hollywood Baseball chit). He and his wife arc expecting their second child in June...Recommended dialog: Robert Cummines' line in "The Chase"—"Tjnie tells on woman, especially u good lime."... Red Skcllon has been offered SBSD,- CCO for his Westwood apartment building. He's thinking it over. A collector's item among record-: Ings are Ihc first ones by Dinah Shore. She did them with Xavier Cugat, and she was so unknown nt th e t' lt:c tn at one disc identifies her as "Dinah Shaw."...It might be said of Nestor Pavi;i. the perennial villain, that he's made screen "hiss-lory." Linda Darnell, thrilled two years ago at (jelling mcanie roles, now would like " c-hnnge of pace back to sweet young things.. .Somerset Maugham, celebrating hl s 75th birthday, plans to write only two more novels. DarryJ Zimuck has liiken an option on both.. .Robert Young is so anxious to got away from sophisticated roles that he's bought Ihe film rights lo a western, "Three with Thoroughbreds," in which he nill appear as a tough, quick-triggered cowboy. He hopes lo produce Ihe film independently after completing work in "Claudia and David." NOT (!ASUAL—SLOI'PY Not In the Script: "In Hollywood the excuse for wearing apparel has been. 'We're casual.' Well, casual s all right, but il isn't Ihe correct vord. The correct word is 'sloppy'." —Ray Driscoll, fashion designer. Ann Sheridan said she hated goo. Also: "If I do have glamour, I'd slve a Rood proportion of the credit 16 the studio workers who keep ne what I am today. "Perc Wcslmorc (head of the Warner makeup dey>t.\ thinks I'm th p natural well-scrubbed type. He fie'hts (o keep me that way, witii a minimum of uilific.c and goo. I dislike "goo, loo. We E^t atonj; fine. "My hairdresser. Helen Tin-pin, tames my hair, ll's always been too curly. But TIU-JI performs some kind of inasic that practically makes my hair do her bidding." Quite a confession from a sla- mour queen. WASHINGTON COLUMN 1920 7 1932, and 1946 Whales do not spout water, con- ,trary to popular belief. The moist air 'blown from the whale's lungs condenses into drops of moisture in i.lhc colder atmosphere .giving the appearance of a fountain of water Army control of manufacture of actual (atom) bombs may be appropriate but there Is grave danger that Army control of scientific research will lead lo national scientific suicide.—Prof Henry DC Wolf Smith of Princeton U. try Hoznl Heidergott SKA SKltVICU. INC. XXIX land a woman's voice said. Hat up in bed, and looked ' Sive you a lift, Mr. Drake? I'm across at her husband, whoU°ing out to see your wife.'.' still sleeping, "Colin," she "Ann isn't home, Mrs. Warren How are you and all Ihe lilllc | Warrens?" Joan Warren frowned, nnt 1 looked troubled. "I wanted lo see anyway— yon home ,\&s still sleeping, "Colin," she said presently. Then again, louder, "Colin?" ; .J'My dear?" he said sleepily, not opening his eyes. 7'Ycu sound familiar," Ann said Ann. Well, get in, musingly. "I wonder why it isl ml E hl as wcl1 ^ c that 3 sometinr.es feel I don't Where is she?" rejilry know you?" " ( "Seattle. She took Susie in I Xolin yawned, then opened his 1 get he: outfitted for school. 1 cres- "When I get out from be- starts next month, and Ann hind these whiskers, it may help," I pretty much starting from scralc h£ suggested, rubbing his clu'n with her wardrobe.' reflectively. | Joan started the car, anil the ^"Silly! I smell bacon," Ann sfTjffod. "That angel Susie! Let's get up—I'm hungry." "I'm afraid I don't Understand hat yon mean. Ann wouldn't roscnUe because she was sorry iv Helgn. lie left town because, icre never would be a job for him ere, alter what happened." "I knov.' that, and of course vcrynne else should, loo. But Seulah is insinuating that it \vas very convenient accident—oh icll. I can't tell you. It's obviously nhsurd. but people will believe inylllin;;!" "Please- tell me the rest of it," Colin said, between set teeth. .loan flushed. She was client while she swung the car into the driveway, nnd stopped the engine, 'c'n she- faced Colin squarely. 'The implication is that the child Ann lost wasn't yours." She caught her breath, then hurst oi't, ' | drove for a few mimiles in silcnc "Maybe it's just as well Ann isn [home—I was so mad, I had turned over and regarded j come tell her, but it probnbl hgr sleepily. "Why?" wouldn't help any—" .Ann swung out of bed, and j "What do you mean?" threw herself upon him. "Lazy- "Well—of course you know that bdnes, I'm taking Susie into town, I charmin' lady Beulah Bcdcllc?" ajd if we want to get there in I "I know her slightly. Her hus- tiaie to get anylhing done, we've I band of course is an old friend, got lo start before long. We'll slay I Ann doesn't like her." a^ay br two, il you can spare the I "I know. And what is perhaps car." I more important, she doesn't like Colin pulled her close to him. j Ann. Of course, you know 1 don't than get around much, and naturally I I'm the last person in town lo J'S-weeV one," she said, turning hear gossip—next to yon and Aim. to" kiss his nose. "How's your of course—but—well, do you wont 'T can spare the car better lijan you," he murmured. nfyel, duck?" . me to tell you this?" ."Drake,"- Colin corrected he* "Please do," Colin said. "If it absently. "It's finished." concerns Ann, I'm the most inter- ^\nn sat up indignantly. "Where I esled person. I won't have that ii^il?" . - I woman hurting Ann!" •^'In the hands of my publisher "She's poisonous!" Joan said -*nay he treat it gently." fervently. "Well—il isn't easy 4'And I haven't seen it!" for me to tell you this, but please -"Time enough, my sweet. Did I understand that 1 don't believe a I'ever tell you how beautiful you word of it, nor an implication I'm are? No? Remind me to tell you simply telling you what Beulah sometime. I c»n wax pretty lyrical is spreading around the town. It's all so hellishly, damnably Kitten, and there's no way of slopping her. Oh God, why didn't somebody strangle that woman years ago?'' "I'd rather cn.ioy doing il my- :-clf," Colin said grimly. "Her little slory certainly puts us bolh pretty light, doc-sn'l it? Am I supposed to be a moron, or didn't she say?—never mind. Do you have any suggestions?" Joan shook her head, "t was hoping Ann could think of some way to shut her moulh." "Nn," Colin said violently. "Ann's not to know of Ibis—not now or ever. Good God, hasn't Ami had enough to bear Ihcsc last few months? I could have Skippy fired, though I'd halo lo—but then they'd leave town—•" Jo;m shook her head. "Don't blame Skippy. I'm sure he doesn't oven know about it. Beulah chooses her audience with discrimination. And that would. m«kc il worse, don't you sec?" '"Vc>," Colin said reflectively, "I BY FETEK KU8ON NEA Wa.shlnRlon Correspondent WASHINGTON, April 10. I.NEA) —Economic Stabilizer Chester Bowles eallv let his hair down when he Hiked at the National Retail Federation meeting in Washington the it her day. Without any of the charts or prepared statements which are Ihe usual stage props for his presentations to Congress, he lalk- cd cxteinperaneously and straight from the shoulder, telling lire story le now knows so well- II is a Klory which everyone should be familiar with as congress gels ready to consldch further extension of price control legislation. This will be Ihe fifth lime in Ihe last four years that price control legislation h[\s been up for renewal. In 1041 no one could have predicated that it would be us successful as it has been. In Ihe war years, Ihc legislation came i through its various renewals without too much change. But Ihis lime, wilh the war all over, lire heat is on so lo amend the law that it won't be recognizable. Bowles confessed frankly to die •retailers that he, like everyone else, is fed up on price control. It's no un. No one in OPA is there by hoice, and (he whole slaff is anxious to get out of the business s anyone else. And yet, he. said, Ihe big hurdle at the end of the race the difficult period ahead, which s an added challenge. INFLATION I.ED TO COLLAPSE AFTER WORLD WAR I For au understanding of that challenge, Howies asked his lislen- crs lo go back and read what happened after the lasl war. Right after Armistice Day. 191B. when prices and XVBKOS Roth advanced over 100 per cent, the experts in ROV- ernmcnt and business decided that the country had had its wartime inflation and it was all over. So they look off what few controls there were and gave the economy a free reign. Business took an low on inventories, and it.s reserves were wiped out. Prolils thai had j been Sti.ono.flfln.OCO in 191fl turned j to $5.000.000.000 losses in 1!>20. Farm prices dropped 45 per cent. Them \ver c 250.00 farm foreclosures and i 166.000 bankruptcies. Payrolls went : clown 55 ncr cent. j OP.VS FUTURE PROGRAM I S OUTLINED Bowles outlined what he thought OPA's policies should he if Con- press passed the nece-ssary lecisln- ion and appropriated the ncces- arv budgets to do OPA's job. He declared il would be lolicy not lo let prices io expect thai people would look over the record and decide they'd better take over nnd run things themselves .The result would be thai free enterprise and free economy would disappear. Head Courier News Wiuit Ads Kills Rats Roaches Biddle Exterminators Uc-eslnblishmcnt of Ihe. Wyoming National Guard will be started about July 1. WHY WOKHV? lorgct the yard lor Ihe summer— Contact us for complete tipkccp, Home Service * Storage Co. Coatiy H. Katon 1'honc H ^aol Membtr Nat'L P«st Control 115 S. Third St. Phone 1751 FOR RENT... Frozen Food Lockers Equipped to Cure Your . Hams, Bacon, Shoulders, Sausage A Complete Meal Curing and Storing Service FROZEN FOODS Phone 2002 Main at 21st Street New Cardinal : HORIZONTAL, "| 8 Roman '1 Pictured -A'- emperor Archbishop, 7 > 10 Winnows ' Francis 11 On the shcl- 9 Exasperates^ o CrCC J, S ', cl ?10 Secure '££& 14 Hebrew 6 " C 13 Dolphin J *y*£ month 17 Back ways 15 Remove portrait 18 Ode endings 16 Glacial ridges 29 Thin 10 Born - 22 Insect • ^ 30 Skills 20 Winglike part 23 Brood o£ ^ff' 32 Wander 21 Closed car pheasants 33 Roster 24 Less polkited 24 Place 34 War god 26 New York 25 Employ - 38 Cereal ' (ab.) '* 28 Sit Tor 3D Wolf hound 27 We 28 Dish 31 Earth 35 Over (conlr.) 3GOur (Scot.) 37 Persian ruler 41 Chemical salt 44 Store 45 Scents 46 He was re- 40 Impudent jg 41 Judicial bench , <•=?. Orator ' (ab.) <!3 Part in play 47 Doctor (ab.) 48 Indian army BONDED AND 24-Hour INSURED TAXI SERVICE CALL 968 f cenlly made 49 Interlude "^f i VERTICAL 1 Location 2 Quarry 3 Sea eag'es 4 Lithium, (ab.) 5 Licutenan'. (ab.) 6 Produce-.". 7 Upon m 3140 ")ur Bcxarding House with Moj'. Hoopla Rniltnad Street Bill Wunderlich — Rear Robinson's Drug Store ' Refrigeration Service! Phone 415 We have an Expert Service Man to take care of your Refrigeration and Washing Machine Service; also Electric Motor Service. Wo also carry a complete stock of New Paits for all makes of Equipment. Work Guaranteed. Reasonable Prices. sucss you're right. Do you suppose if I saw her — no, that would wt do any good. She doesn't lieav me any special love, since Milli- oa the subject. In fact . all very insidious, but her innu- . , 4'Oh, you're hopeless!" Ann said.lcndos are worse than plain a«d vanished into her dressing ments would be. The general idea room. , is that you didn't prosecute Pete T * * .* ICarpello but got him out ot town /7OLIN .came out of the post! because the accident was fortu- ^••oflicc mi started townrd nate for Ann and s'nc maJe Jwm«. A car slopped beside him, [worth his wliile." cenl Ills voice trailed off. Absently, ho lit a cigarel, then rccollccuxi himself and ottered one to his companion. "I think I have il, Joan," he said, using her Christian 11 a m c unconsciously, "and thanks a lol—you're a good friend to Ann, bless you." ^t- (To He Continued) s *'"*« OPA's inlerferr with production. OPA has nhvativ allowed many prices to advmree, as an incentive to Rot Ihe most necessary produclion. This dill not mean that anyone's word \vonlri be taken wlien he demanded that liis prices be raised, nor thai they would br raised just to make anyone feel better. The controls would be kepi "n, Bowles declared, just to co< live eclillR of stabilization a little more irmly established, to get the s^''•- ilattve. urtfc settled do\vn. An<! xcepl for rents, real estates, build- ng materials, and a lew o'li'-r terns, the country could be out !rom mder controls by June, IEH7. At the worst, il could mean k"rn- np the country under what mkht superfluous controls for aimth- 12 or 15 months. At licit, it could me.m preventing Increase.; in the cost of food and npp.irel. a rise in the cost of living, and ihf Mart of another sleigh rule, with no Idling wliat might happen ul- lerwnrd. If it was loo bard rcmcnibeiin:: what happened in 1919 a) there were still plenty of who co'.ihl remember \vhat h; In the rv.isl\ of 1929 and the collapse of 1932. Howies pointed nut If IbOM- things were allowed to b;ui- l>cn i\u,uu, it would be only u.auiu Tom Little Appliance Co. 105 V/cst Main St, Blytheville, Ark. Approved Avery So/es and Service. Let us repair and service your Avery equip- men. FOR SALE Funk's G Hybrid Seed Corn Cotton Hoes Cultivator Sweeps OWENS TRACTOR CO. A. C. OWENS, Owner & Mgr. 112 N. Franklin Phone 3617 GAD, OST HAME SEl\ST VOL)/ VOU Ell^SS A PAlt-XTER, U£T OS IPiKE A t>EA,L-—- VOO PAlniT HES6 CHPUQS AMD I'LL 6N6 OL5 -~^- LET'S SEE ~ BARTEC S A POPULAR. PRACTICE NiOvM HOVM ABOUT A BRACE OP PISTOLS couxsT r>e t^O GLIKi?,, MA30R..' / TURNKEY IS A 45-CALIBER- BEP\D ON! ME NOVO BECAUSE I'M BENJCH6Q WITH A UAN\E 8AC *<.'-— BUT I'LL t>O IT FOR. A RAILROKD TlCViET' TO 8OMOS Out Our Way ByJ.R. Williams THIS? WHY. IM MAXIM OME RUSTIC E OUT O 1 1HXT OLD 1RPE.' TH 1 DOCTOR. TOLD ME TO "TAKE VVAIKS IM TH' YARD, BUT -SIT POVVM ( OFTE r M,VV!7H \ THIS HEART ROUBLE.

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