The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa on February 26, 1946 · Page 11
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The Algona Upper Des Moines from Algona, Iowa · Page 11

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Algona, Iowa
Issue Date:
Tuesday, February 26, 1946
Page:
Page 11
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i >m l , Ft§. 26, 1946 AL06NA UPPER DES MOINKS, AT,OONA H)WA_L_. lue Denim \ 8 02. Sanforized |e have received quite a lot of this hard [get item. , Get Yours Now yd. Departmenl Stores ' r 4 ( « ; ;I FORESIGHT AHEAD is easier than wCp r~ with : FRQNT-MOUNTED Implements Allis-Chalmers FRONT-MOUNTED ALLIS-CiHALMERS planters, cultivators* fertili/er attachments and rotary hoes 'are ahead of the driver's seat ... a major step forward in tractor implement design. Model C Allis-Chalmers implements respond instantly to hydraulic control —and you can watch what's happening without twisting to look behind. DUAL DEPTH CONTROL gauges the depth of right and left gangs . . . [ independently. "Foresight is easier than hindsight" the Allis- Chalmers way. Stop in and let us show f«'r^pu'how much: difference forward vision can make. Bradley Bros *hone 714 Algous, Iowa .'•-...-i'-.i:!9* Learn, a lesson from her, friends, fprgetting, {n YOUR jjpsjtion •<—as a motorist-*-may be damag* REMEMBER! «-*• have a complete lubricatipn job done regularly; have an oil change every twp sj wse a qtwHty gasplioe, in bjve all thret « Orange and SMJs 66 Famous Sim »mim6| {Phillip; ss expert (??§ayi»§ i-Tiffi ' HARMS OIL iPRAffilE-LUVERNE 4-H CLUB HAS ACTIVE MONTH Wesley: The Prairie-LuVerne 4-H club meeting was held at the home of Howard Mullins Thursday evening, Fob; 14. The meeting wns called to order by the president, and roll call was talc- on by the secretary. Each meii'i- •ber answered with "What I most enjoy doing in the farm shop. Four new members were signed up, making n total of 32. There were 21 members present at this mooting. A talk on how to sharpen chisels was given by Carol Wolf. Then a talk on the kind of tools that should be used and a discussion on the size of the shop was given by James Mullins. County Extension Director A .L. Brown was present and gave hints on conducting a meeting. Herman Studer, the leader Albert Johnson, assistant leader and Herman Bode were present at the meeting. Several songs were sung by the group. The meeting was adjourned and a delicious lunch was served by Mrs. Mullins, Wednesday evening, Feb. 13, a county-wide meeting of 4-H club officers and leaders was held at Burl in (he hotel with an attendance of 40. A discussion on how to conduct a 4-H club meeting was held. A basketball tournament was planned for March 7-8-9 at Burt high school. From Prairie township Herman Studer, leader, Donovan Studer, president, Jerry Elbcrt, secretary-treasurer, and Ben Widen, reporter, were present. Albert Yegge, Ronald Yegge, Dennis Yegge and Billy Goetz came from Wesley township. They are trying to organize a 4-H boys club and wanted information on same. Appendix Out .. Larry Youngwirth submitted to an appendectomy at the Kossuth hospital at Algona Wednesday morning. Wagner Boys Home Dwight Wagner arrived home last week with his discharge following' 40 months service with the navy In the Pacific war zone. Benny Wagner, yeoman 1-c, is also a civilian following 52 months service. They are sons of Mr. and Mrs". Al Wagner. Slitch & Chat Club The Stitch and Chat Circle met with Mrs. Mike Flom Wednesday evening. Clarence Fish, of the navy, is a civilian here again. Miss Eva McCall has been The K. Y. N. met Wednesday afternoon with Mrs. Theron Hansen. Mr. and Mrs. Ed Welter of East Dubuque were visitors at .ho George Ricke home last week. Mrs. Will Knight was taken to the Kossuth hospital in Algona Friday, Feb. 15, and is in a critical condition. Mrs. Oliver Young was hostess to the .Willing Workers Circle of the Methodist Ladies' Aid Wednesday afternoon. • Mr. and Mrs. H. J. Braley returned Wednesday from a ten weeks visit with their three children and their families in the east. Homer Lawson, Albert Ne'u- roth, and Frit? Gerdes, the latter of Woden, spent a week at Colfax lately, where they received medical treatment. Mr, and Mrs. Casper Kuper, son and daughter, left Wednesday for their home at Alexandria, having also attended the Haverly funeral, Mrs. Kuper is the former Agnes Haverly. Mr. and Mrs. Paul Trumbull of Mason City have moved into the G. L. Olson home with Mrs. Olson. He is employed in the mail department on the Milwaukee railroad and makes his route from Algona to Chamberlain, S. D, Dr. and Mrs. H, H. Raney had as their Wednesday evening dinner guests Mr. and Mrs. Tom McMahon, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Bleich and Mr. and Mrs. Chas, Mullin. Bridge was the diversion of the evening with Mr, Mullin and Mrs. ' McMahon receiving high score prizes, Mr. and Mrs. Art Haverly went to Algona Wednesday to visit relatives 'before leaving the next . day for their home at Bloomer, Wis. They had been here to attend the funeral of his< mother, Mrs. Agatha Haverly, 84, who died Saturday morning, Feb. 10, at her home here. Sgt. Bob Lawson arrived home Thursday with his discharge following four years service in the army. Russell and Dick Lawson are also out of the army. Russell is visiting his mother in Kansas City. Dorothy Lawson was in the army nurses' corps. The young folks are sons and daughter of Homer Lawson. The Prairie Pals 4-H club held a valentine party at the home of their leader, Mrs. Lou Wingort Wednesday evening. Games were played and lunch served. Rites At Bode Feb. 19 For Miss Martha HallSgan Bode: Funeral services were held in the Bode Lutheran church Tuesday afternoon for Miss Martha TIallenger who died in a Sioux City hospital Friday evening, Feb., 15, after a stroke. She had lived here all her life and for many years was connected with the business activities of Bode, later taking up work traveling for an out-of-town concern. Rev. Martin Trygstad was in charge of the services. She is survived by one sister, Miss Emma Hallenger. Her parents preceded her in death many years ago. Burial took place in the Bode cemetery with Skaug- stad's Funeral Home in charge. Mr. and Mrs. Ward Hanson of Mason City were recent visitors at the John Christiansen home. Miss Lou Hanson and Mrs. John Christiansen and children spent the weekend in Cedar Rapids at the Al Wildcrman home. C. B. Matticc has gone in business at Fonda, and as soon as he. can obtain living quarters there for his family who are living :it the home of her parents Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Holland, while he was in service, will move them to Fonda, where they will make their home. The Red Cross rooms were closed Wednesday afternoon on account of the Humboldt county teachers meeting held there on Wednesday evening. The Band Mothers served refreshments which was a banquet at 7 p. m. There was a good attendance and a good program. Lieut, and Mrs. Herbert Larsen, after a week's visit at the home of his parents Mr. and Mrs. Larson, have returned to their home in Balbpa, Calif. Mr. and Mrs. Richard Cottington have left for Des Moines, where they will spend a few days visiting relatives. Attending the 5-county Auxiliary meeting in Algona.:Friday, W&S&tti?- were SfeilKt&f^Wf~ tMi Bode'American Legion Auxiliary including Mrs. Eugene Lyons, Mrs. Leonard Schmidt, Miss Laila Hanson, Mrs. J. P. Jensen, Mrs. Paul Wade, Mrs. Albert Bergum, Mrs. Henry Olson and Mrs. Borgina Johnson. Mr. and Mrs. Charles Duncan after spending a. week at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Halvorson, have returned to "their home in Fort Dodge. While here the Halvor- sons held a family reunion honoring Mr. Duncan and another son-in-law who had just received their honorable discharges from the armed forces. Also present at the gathering was another daughter and son-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. A. J, Meints and son of. Belmond. P. O. Esmay accompanied a party of Humboldt county farmers, including Ole Carlson. John Hinrichs, Carl Underberg, and Ed Oppedahl to Des Moines last week, where they attended the National Farm Institute, Mrs. Otis Sanders, Mrs. Beryl MeLaughlin and Glen Sanders, after attending funeral services 'for their husband father, have remained for a weed's visit at the home of Mrs.' Orvin Kinne. All Kinds of CARPENTER And REPAIR WORK See BUD ROBINSON 801 South Jerome St. Phone 928-J 4-8» Vet Visiting At Wesley, West Bend Wesley: Mr. and Mrs. Hubert Muiisou and 5 months old daughter ai" visiting the parental Mrs. Eunice Nelson home here and at his p.ircnlal home in West Bend. Robert has > received his discharge from the army following 43 months in the medical detachment .stationed' in the States, lately at. Camp Crawford, S. C., where tliev were married. Mi"-. MuiK'f.'ii is tile forme-' Ui'l'f n Nelson iT.ci her husband i; 1 . a Brother of f .'lii''»i'<l Munsnn. of V.Vsl licti'l but who was employed in the Kxchatu'.e Slate bank here .several years ni'o, . Seneca Women At Bancroft Shower Seneea: Me;:dame?; Otto R. Jen.;en, Russell Jensen, Francis Foley. Dan Lynch, and Miss Tena Jensen attended a miscellaneous shower honoi'iiu; Estella Elsbeckor at (he Si. John's hall al Bancroft Ir-st Sunday afternoon. Miss Elsbockor and Fred Kadow Jr. of Bancroft were married al the St. John's Catholic church at Bancroft lust Tuesday morning. Automobile Repairing \ ' ' . . • • -' ' ' •.' Electrical and Generator j$ Every street needs a gritty, non-skid surface for the protection of motorists and pedestrians. At night you need a pavement with high visibility. Safety also calls for a pave' ment that is free from chuck holes, ruts and bumps . ; ; and stays that way with nynimum maintenance. You want a pavement that drains quickly . . . that is easily cleaned and stays clean :;. 00 depressions to catch dirt. @) You -want a pavement that ' /makes the whole neighborhood look modern, prosperous, attractive. Concrete ;;; and only concrete . ; . completely meets fill of these specifications. For complete pavsmenf facts write to CEMENT ASSOCBATaON 403 Hubbell Bldg. Qes Moines 9, Iowa A national orgcnirn/ion la improve and oxtanci tho uses of concrete through jc/en- title research ond. engineering field work. You'll have a delightful new room as if by magic when you use DURA- TONE . . . the finish that makes a "game" out of painting. It's loads of fun . . . and so easy to apply that little Jean or Jimmy can help you decorate. DURA-TONE One Gallon '$249 Quart . .. Only 69c DURA-TONE is economical . . . one gallon thinned with water makes one and one-half gallons of paint— enough for an average size room (10><xl2feet, including ceiling). DURA-TONE enables you to he your own decorator . .. you can transform drab rooms easily and quickly—the soft pastel shades blend beautifully with your decoration scheme. Choose from eight lovely colors and white. DuRA-ToNE contains a resin-oil base and quality pigments like those in regular oil paints. And the government "scrub" test proves DURA-TONE tougher, more durable than similar types of paints. (Sold Exclusively at Gambles) - One. coal corcrs mosf; surfaces . . . painted walls, wnllboard, plaster—over, wnllpaper and bricks. No sizing needed. Drips in nut! Jitnir . . . you can redecorate and u»/3 the room the same flay. No unpleasant paint uuor. Cleans with mild soap nnd water. Filsany broom —soft fluffy cctlon. Removes cobwebs and dust. Fashianuble Jlul. finish . . . the soft, glareless pastel tones of DURA-TONE bring new charm to your rooms. SUPER LINOLEUM VARNISH A Quick-drying Floor Finish t. Here is a high gloss, wear-resisting finish for your felt-base rugs. Quick-drying . . . will not crack or chip. Pint, .. .53c The Friendly Store This is grand...Have a Coca-Cola , .nothing Ukti refmbmmt . \? W .•;_:,•-. • . , . There's nothing nicer than intimate moments between friends.,. moments when 1 fee} real close and shar? {bpughfs §ui4 ffsJi^gs. Thfisg aje frfendJjf tjmes. To just such, times Coca-Cola belongs. There's t|? spjj $; gf|ipridj|nj;s§ pitftlifs «ffid' jjp&k' The^'n fun ins its delicious refreshment, Tjjg ^pipjf ^n % £$&.f&3 t's why Coca-Cola," belongs in your family refrigerator, ' "'ipi m ' ; i^^M^^**^S|^?*^"'-^'^^"^^ s *^—• B '^^—™"*

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