The Age from Melbourne, Victoria, Australia on February 11, 1988 · Page 6
Get access to this page with a Free Trial

A Publisher Extra Newspaper

The Age from Melbourne, Victoria, Australia · Page 6

Publication:
Location:
Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Issue Date:
Thursday, February 11, 1988
Page:
Page 6
Start Free Trial
Cancel

6- THE AGE, Thursday 11 February 1988 last from faulty shotgun lolled e0C lflES81M An inquest was told yesterday that a drunken 17-year-old youth had been shot dead, apparently accidentally and with a faulty shotgun, after he was found on a country property at Silvan, hi the Dandfnongs, The coroner, Mr Hal Hallen-, stein, was told that Mr Sean Daniel Golding, of Harwell Road, Ferntree Gully, had been hit by a shotgun blast in the right chest about 4.45 am on 19 July. The shot had severed a major blood vessel and smashed into the spine caus freedom; (1) the state or quality of being free (2) the ability to go where you want, when you want (3) liberation from the control of other persons or powers, liberty, independence (4) being free of the usual rules, conventions, patterns, etc (5) exemption from arbitrary restrictions (eg.) the kind of liberation offered by the short wheelbase LandCruiser called Bundera. Turbo power and coil spring agility. A genuine LandCruiser 4WD. Definitely not a toy, but heaps of fun and very versatile. Ideal second (or first) family vehicle. (KB.) See your Toyota dealer for test drive. ing immediate unconsciousness and rapid death. Mr Kenneth Lincoln Shaw, 45, of Monbulk-SeviUe Road. SUvao,-told police during an interview that morning that he had tripped and his shotgun, which had a faulty left barrel, had gone off accidentally. Mrs .Roberta White, said she and her son had heard their car's horn blow early that morning while they were in their house adjoining Tim's Fruit Barn where the shooting happened. Her son, Mr Lucas White, 19, had rung Mr Shaw, a family friend, for help i i . jLDjL '"'jiJ& i" (3. because they were both afraid. (The coroner was told there had been a recent hold-up in the area and residents feared prowlers, but only -one police divisional van was available to police an area of 4500 square kilometres). Mr White said that when Mr Shaw arrived, he had a shotgun. "I was shocked, but then you just never know," Mr White told Mr Hallenstein. He and Mr Shaw had found nothing until Mr White opened his car door and was confronted by the youth. Mr White had yelled to Mr Shaw, who pointed the gun at the LandCruiser youth, coroner told youth (Mr Golding) and told him to stand still. According to Mr White, Mr Golding replied: "It's all right, man. OK, man." Mr White said be had been inside, about to call police, when the shot rang out "I heard Ken say: Oa, no. Then there was a passe and be was saying: Tve killed the kid'," Mr White said. He said Mr Shaw had become hysterical and was "in another world". Mrs White said she had found Mr Shaw cradling Mr Golding "like a baby". Mr Shaw told police in an inter-view that Mr Golding had begun Bundera moving one way and the other and when he (Shaw) had moved forward, he tripped and the gun went Off. ' : ; I '' Mr Damien Nelson Howard, 17, of Ferntree Gully, a friend of Mr Golding, said Mr Golding had drunk a 750ml bottle of Scotch and other drinks at a party the night before the shooting. Dr John Hayman, who , performed an autopsy on Mr Col-ding's body, said he had a blood alcohol level of 0.212 and a urine alcohol level of 0.288. The inquest continues today. - TOYOTA DFSTH15M It's easy. AH you need is a minimum of $5,000. Invest it in fyramid's Quarterly Income Account and you'l be paid 14 interest every rVlardv June, : September and December. The rate is fixed for 3 years so you won't have to worry about fluctuating incomes. QJAWIRLY INCOME ACC Melbourne: Ph 654 8222670 8544, Geelong: Ph. 22 4244, Werribee: Ph. 741 1 staff reMgp i M Fairfax inow , By M FRAN, and JUwaTTTt YOUNQ, TThfr Sydney Morning' Herald' was in turmoil last night after the resignations of the editor-in-chief, the editor and six senior journalists, and concern by staff over editorial independence. , At a meeting yesterday afternoon,, journalists employed on the Sydney-based papers of John Fairfax and Sons passed a motion .of no confidence in the company's semor management and in particular the group managing director (editorial), Mr Martin Dougherty. Journalists on The Sydney Morning Herald' voted to strike until the first shift on Sunday. The ructions follow the privatisation of the company in December and the appointment of a new board and senior management, including Mr Dougherty, a former public relations consultant The resignations are a further blow to Fairfax, which is facing a debt of more than $1 billion and is negotiating the possible sale of part-interests in some of its newspapers to offset the cost of the privatisation by the owner, Mr Warwick Fairfax. The publisher of The Age', David Syme & Co. Limited, is a wholly owned subsidiary of Fairfax. Since late last year, Fairfax journalists in Sydney have several times voiced concern about what they claim to be senior management's interference in editorial decisions. In December, a former editor of 'Australian Business, and more recently a senior News Corporation journalist in New York, Mr Andrew Clark, was appointed an associate editor without consultation with the editor-in-chief, Mr Chris Anderson, or the editor, Mr John Alexander. After discussions with the house committee of the Australian Journalists Association about this appointment, Mr Dougherty gave the union assurances about the right of editors to hire and fire. Yesterday morning, Mr Ander son announced his resignation Talks begin on hospital's debt to state By ANDREW STEPHENS Two State Government depart ments have begun negotiations on how the West Gippsland Hospital should repay $3.32 million received four years ago for a lin en service. Meetings have been held between the Department of Management and Budget and the Health Department, but no agreement has been reached, a spokes man for the Health Minister, Mr White, said yesterday. The Opposition spokesman on health, Mr Birrell, said there had been chronic mismanagement over the linen service money, which was intended as a loan but which the hospital received as a grant He said the hospital now appeared unable to repay. Mr Birrell said the hospital was due to repay $1 million at the end of last June but defaulted. He said the Treasurer, Mr Jolly, was demanding that the loan be repaid with interest, even though. the hospital did not have the money. The Government seems inca pable of determining if the $3.32 million grant was really a loan, if the loan will ever be repaid and, if it is to be repaid. where the money is to come from," Mr Birrell said. Mr White announced yester day that the Central Linen Service and laundries in Victorian public hospitals would be reviewed to improve perfor mance. Releasing a report of a ministerial review which identified weaknesses in the service, he said many of the problems had already been dealt witn. ' - A spokesman for Mr White said the recommendations of the report would be considered and a cost assessment made. Compare this rate to other banks, building sodeties and finance companies and enjoy the security Prarnid can offer you. Pyramid Buudug Society is a division of the Farrow GrporatJon with assets in excess of $1-1 bSSbh. after seven years as editor, and editor-in-chief. Mr dark was appointed to replace him, More resignations toBowed: the editor, Mr John Alexander; the news editor, Mr Richard Glover; the finance editor, Ms Deborah Light; the chlef-of-staff, Mr Paul McGeough; the invest ment editor, Mr Alan Deans; Ms Colleen Ryan and Ma . Anne Lampe. "Three senior finance reporters also resigned. . ... Mr Anderson told the staff be had decided that after the new management had taken over it would be in the best interests of himself and the company for him to leave. Mr dark also addressed the staff and pledged that he would maintain journalistic excellence and editorial independence. The paper can only be improved by staff working well by good-quality journalism and by the staff having confidence in the executives, which includes me, so I have got to win your confidence." "' After a stormy two-hour meeting, about 500 journalists resolved not to cooperate with any editors appointed without satisfactory consultation. The meeting called for a committee of five people to seek a new editor, and urged those who had resigned to reconsider. A meeting of 'Age' journalists last night passed a motion supporting the Sydney journalists' moves on editorial Independence. The meeting expressed confidence in and support for the managing director of Syme, Mr Greg Taylor, and the editor of The Age', Mr Crelghton Burns, and reaffirmed a demand that The Age' continue to be managed by an independent, local board. Mr Dougherty was unavailable for comment last night, bat in an interview with The Age' in December he said both The Age' and The Sydney Morning Herald' were "cornerstones of the independent press voices in Australia". "We intend to maintain that independence for both newspapers and, indeed, all our publications," he said. K v r r. x t .a 1 v H It looks as if Bronwyn Litem is a traditionalist. She arrived early yesterday at Mercy Maternity HospitaU to share the birthday of her mother, Mrs Julia Litem, and grandmother, Mrs Mary Holland. Man guilty of schoolgirl's murder By FIONA ATHERSMrrH A 22-year-old man was yesterday found guilty by a Supreme Court jury of murdering a schoolgirl who worked part-time at a supermarket where he worked. The body of Jacqueline Mat thews, 18, of Evans Street, Moonee Ponds, was found in the back seat of a burning car parked at the Arundel Road bridge in' Keilor on 9 April 1988. She had been stabbed seven times. Steven James Hunter, 22, for merly of the Willowbank Cara van Park in Westmeadows, has been remanded by Mr Justice Nathan for plea and sentencing. The jury- was told that Miss 474 4 Country Vic Senator Haines: dismayed at three-how talks. j Hand's tour of blacks a sham, say Democrats By MARK MCTHERELl, Canoaffa The national tour by the Abarl-glaal Affair Minister, Mr Hand, ta commit black comma-, nities abeat wide-raafiag . re-farms af Aboriginal administration was attacked a sham by the Australia Pern erats yesterday. - Mr Hand Is visitiag abwst 4 communities during a five-weak taur to gang e reaction ta prapea als for what hekasdescrifcedas the "most f ar-reaching aad Innovative reform" of Aberigiaal administration in two decade. Bat the Democrats' leader,:: Seaator Haines, said yesterday' she - was "angered - aad din- n saayed" that Mr Head had set : aside a mere three hoars far die- casslons with each coauawaity. l Mr Hand announced last Bw' eember plans by the Gevera-meat for a complete1 restractaring ef .Aboriginal ministration, inciadiag lishmeat of aa Aboriginal aad Torres Strait Islander Commit-' sioa on 1 July. He has saW the prspastf . tractate would Iodide a system of 2S regional ceaneUs ta enable Aborigines, aad lalaad-era ta have a real say in the re-' lag of their affair. Seaator Haines said fester-day: These people are being give a matter of weeks t came sp with an iafermed Jadgaeat aad a eoasldered respeas ' about something which has bee labelled by the Gavernmeat as a foudatio for their fatare aad a proposal of great and historic importance for all AastrallansV Mr Haad eoald act be reached for comment last algat A Matthews worked inrt-time at the Gladstone Park Hypermarket and on the night of her death had offered to drive Hunter home for his office keys, which he had forgotten. Hunter later told police Miss Matthew drove in the opposite direction and parked the car so they iduld kiss and cuddle, but that he had got angry because he had to get back to work. - He told police he struck her, and she produced a knife to scare him. They struggled and he accidentally stabbed her in the throat, then. panicked aad stabbed her again because she was screaming.- Victoria's 2nd largest Building Society Authorised for Trustee Status in Victoria . TOG SOCIETY

Get access to Newspapers.com

  • The largest online newspaper archive
  • 19,600+ newspapers from the 1700s–2000s
  • Millions of additional pages added every month

Publisher Extra Newspapers

  • Exclusive licensed content from premium publishers like the The Age
  • Archives through last month
  • Continually updated

Try it free