The Bee from Danville, Virginia on January 8, 1937 · Page 6
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The Bee from Danville, Virginia · Page 6

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SIX THE BEE. DANVILLE. VA,, FRIDAY, JANUARY *, 1937 Every Week-Pay Afternoon TheKEGlSTKK I'CBUSJUNG CO.. luc. Danville, Va. TEUU'HOXKS Business & Ci-culatlou Depts. No. 21 Editors or Reporters ........ No. 333 Society Editor ............. No. 334 KATES ,.. An Angle On Conservation - An iiiterestiug monograph prepared at the University of Virginia on the importance oj" keeping the rich store of Virginia iiianuscripis intact throws Jight on a neglected corner of state conservation. Virginia is rich in hidden archives, uiauy of which are in the possession of old families stored iu old family mansions, but continually in a state of deterioration. Library experts estimate M.»st-K«-AJu,> «,»*«• l t!:!it cvcr - v five scc ' onds i-ive ounces of valuable and historic THE BEifm the city and suburbs is! papers have found their way into the iusides of mice so great is ''he ravage of these rodenls. Deterioration is increased by dampness and mildew also dry heat which makes historic writ- THE"" BEE by mail'. w.oo » year; | ings crumble to pieces when touched. Then, there is the menace served by oarrieds on their own ac-j)] Je ravage of these rodents. count at 13c a week and sold by newsboys at 3c a copy otfoct advance. (lllt of *«' <• organisations and libraries well heeled with money | lo ouy up rare wriiings. Twenty thousand Virginia manuscripts NOTE: The above rate* apply only i wore purchased durini: the past twelve months bv out-of-state 3 2 and 3. Rates 1:1 • - * Damon Runyon On Everything to postal zones 3. 2 and 3. Rates , 1:1 beyond 3rd zone given on request. | "' n *" Notice is mailed before expiration, i subscribers should give prompt •1,1 on o rcnctta.£. These things are mentioned to drive home into the mind of ' | everyone that, much of the atmosphere of old Virginia lies in J these antiquities and that they should be preserved; that there *{ should he a larger public sense oi' fitness of things iu keeping in j Virginia the papers that provide the background oi' its culture • land its historic associations. The automobile is plaviutr its wart Cni-lljieCL W»* ^J-JC ucn.: J w* * - j^«--< * ' ' j I I ' '•" t* i 11 t * * o i of ail news dispatches credited to it i in the dissemination oi the old papers tor there are frequent or not otherwise credUcd^n this j f am j| y gfiiherings and conferences over old heirlooms many of paper ana also ,_, ._ _. _1 „,_ ; \vhicli arp. (hsl rihulfd miH oyn-in/l OIVUT in Kn l«Pf ,1«, „* .,„,) Member Audit Bureau of Member of Tl>c Associated Press entitled herein 50 Aights fepubii- cation of special dispatches herein we , deteriorating. are distributed and carried away to be left dormant "and also reserved. Virginia has twelve institutions which arc safe depositories National Advertising KepreyentsuiTc: j for historic writ ilia's and what is more the state is doiu^ a splen- Ne J?orf-%So ^f^uis i < ]i d work in preserving them through the medium of the camera. Atlanta — Dallas — San Francisco j Papers which will be illegible in a few years are being photo- Los Angeles— Portland-Seattle _ I p Ta phed and restored to a clarity which" makes them readable By DAMON KUNY'ON (Copyright) MIAMI BEACH, Fla.—Mr. Frank Hale, on a b«t, couldn't now turn around twice without falling down. He would see sun spots before his eyes. Verglto would ensue. Mr, Frank Hale is around 44 years of age, slightly corpulent and has been living easy for quite a spell. This is the same Mr. Frank Hale who, in 1911. and for several years thereafter, could execute 58 complete revolutions In a minute and twelve seconds while doing a danc© that he brought off the Barbary Coast in San Francisco called the Texas Tommy. It was the fastest dance known to what we might call the terpischor- ean -art, and there hasn't been any faster since. It Involved the use of a female partner, in Mr. Kale's first case, a Miss Marie Tolmau, and the Texas Tommy was an old tune called "King Chanticleer," which any doddering citizen or middle age will easily re- THE TRAILER ERA "Entered at Danviiie. va.. Post office ' aud of permanent value. as second-class mail matter. FRtn.AT. -IAN. S, 1937 A Thought For I was an hungered, and ye pare me meal: 1 was thirsty, and yr pive me drink: 1 was a stranger, and ye took me in.—St. Matthew "S5:3:>. Kindness is the golden chain by which, society is bound together. —Goethe. A inrinians who own historic papers may well be urged to play a part iu their preservation by giving them to those state centres where preservation has become a science and where due credit will be accorded gifts. I Historic materials have aii untold value. We should all be j alert to their preservation making possible new research into dim i and obscure passages of early state history in order that the j mosaic of the Old Dominion's contribution to the nation may be j recorded for all time. In many an attic may be some literary frasmient of transcending state importance. —o—— A Word From thg Council So much has been said during recent weeks about Danville's Patrick county enterprise and so much public concern is beginning to be manifested over its completion that a reassuring statement from the City Council will be in order. Those close to the project are convinced that there is nothing materially vrrang, merely a succession of irritating delays which, i are found part and parcel, so often, with any sort of enterprise [in which the. federal government has a hand. The consulting 'engineers who admit that the job is five months behind time also say that unless they are checkmated between now and Spring they will have current flowing into Danville from The Pinnacles before next Christmas Day. But the fact that fifteen mouths has been spent and more than half a million dollars with no actual construction is causing some recrimination and people who bought blocs of the bonds luw ««u., « ,^ e be f™ in S to talk. The interests originally inimical to The CONSOLIDATION MX i.—Washing- ;1 lunacies are saying "I told you so :: and there is a ruffle on the (By FAtT. MALLOX) ", 1937. by raul Mallon) •a government officials. An j The involvement of the National Park Service has been hio-h- ' ,^ n r^ BT S! 1 -T 1ul ^ ortl ? n8 i te but as guardian of the national resources it prob- LjlLiJCQ. -I-IC- Vi^w &XAVA 5 rtKIf*Tf/-li-n4- t T«i,lA. J. ' -i • . •• ......... - 1 and old (Mara) Icies of PWA and BOX. They have been aer the executive secret, conferences Tith the chief. I^OP, ~U F ^ «, . is Difficult now to ignore it with officials of the and only Mr. Bar- I ^ orks administration holding the position that they do. _ , _-.«.•. i r Pl, _ f~^. ."i'ii i . -.. _ *' _ The Council is the best medium of reassuring the people that t is safeguarding the public purse, that it has assurances that secre. onu^..-* — — , J* D ^ tenal ^ati 01 i of the project is not going to cost more is said -toy have been told that, if jinan there are PAY A funds to pay with. A plain statement of r leak developed, they could make tact from the Council will be a source of comfort to those who are ir money somewhere else there- reacting to the existing situation embellished with a fair measure . ! Oi exa<r<rerated fears. their moss after and not get it irora lb.an. Well, here is the leaS: A department- of public -welfare will be created sometims within the nest few months. It -Kill mean the} consolidation of the Hopkins Works Progress Administration and the Ickes Public Works Administration and -0— Riding the Job Critical eyes turned on President Roosevelt as he stood at the lectern making his address at the joint session on Tuesday ***'•>* man rolvnst who has thrived on the exceptional demand's the past four years. The observation was Mr. Martin Beck, then the big mogul of the old Orpheum vaudeville time, brought Mr. Hale, and Miss Tolman, and another chap known as "Dutch Mike" .and a Miss Stella Joha- son, East from the Barbary Coast to perform the Texas Tommy for the edification of the cash customers, and the dance set the Eastern provinces agog. "Dutch Mike" is dead, and we had Mr. Hale cudgeling his brain over his afternoon coffee for a couple of hours the other day trying to recall Mike's last name, without success. That Bike could turn on, too, with ;he Texas Tommy. The dance was originated by Mr. Hale when he was only about sixteen i'ear s old, and a kid hoofer in the hot spots along the Barbary Coast and elsewhere In San. Franci'sco, when t was the hottest town on earth. He worked at Schiff's cafe at Turk and Eddy, among other places, and 'Dutch Mike" was in the midway. Mr. Hale doesn't remember now ust now how he came to devise the Texas Tommy, but he i s pretty sure he elaborated on a dance known as he St. Louis Toledo, and he is also pretty Sure that this was the germ if syncopation in dancing in this ountry. Ball room dancing by the sleek looking, well mannered and mainly somewhat Latin teams that we know today, is the old Cubanola Glide along with the Texas Tommy slowed down, and vastly refined and with a strong dash also greatly purified of another dance that Mr. Hale had originated, known as the Bunny Hug. Mr. Hale had acquired something of a reputation around San Francisco with his Texas Tommy, when one night Mr. Charles de Young, one of the owners of the San Francisco ^HOLIDAY MTERY By IDA R. GLEASON © 1936, NEA Service, Inc. positaly Ell the spending and lending FLSEHCiCS tl&TTQ^" tO CIO WltJl JJUDllC j , . — .», .---— — -^ w T./.J ^ welfare, such a^ the various housing j "Of, merely ocular. Those close to the president—even Mrs groups, portions of resettlement and jiioosevelt—admit that his health is better than it lias been for ance aaininjstrai.ioii 10 DC c?et f ivnf KPPIIIC in ITHI-,I t-rii-.-,,,"!^-^,-! I.:,. • . .1-11 ", aer the Wagner bUl. The new de-j:;" Seeffls ™ 1la \<- ' will have permanent status ! inroads On his Vitality. his mind and has made no serious partment like the other regular govern- 1 Thus are refuted the prophets who have said that four v " Who the new cabinet member -will j be is net yet certain, but it may be I Hopkins. He seems to be the logical; RooseA'elt. choice. Note—^Probably nothing fatal will f -7 and readv for ears »«» «* ««« <•= Even the arduous campaign did not seem to effect Mr. ?evelt. He had a winning smile, a cheery laugh, never got I so immersed in politics as not to enjoy a good storv.° His nervous Chronicle, summoned him to the old Thalia, a collar-and-elbow joint on the Barbary Coast, where, it appeared Mr. de Young had a slumming party. When Mr. Hale arrived there, with his box hair cut, and box coat and high-heeled shoes, the plate of fashion and the mould of hoofer form for those days, Mr. de Young introduced him to a young lady in his party, and said he wanted Mr. Frank Hale to dance the Texas Tommy with her. "Do you know it?" Mr. Hale asked the gal. "No", she said, "but I'd like to learn it." CHAPTER XXI That night at dinner there was another vacant place at the table. It .i'lUUT?— rl XJU<iUl\ ilULJAitife ^avcll «**. i . . 1 I 1 *! T •--,. . A^.J •_• A,l \^ I t \J Lt o Happen to Hopkins and ickes because j s >* iem LS AVCU balanced, according to his secretariat, and he be- oi tie disclosure- The public welfare j.frays none of the irritations'which some of his predecessors did consolidation is only one of the sub-j as they began to crack under the str-iin iects discussed at the sub-table meet-1 m. eo ; o . 0< . nf - f r • , .' "' . . inas. What President Roosevelt ap-| rr J . JC Seciet °f Jt Jles : » ^S mental attitude towards his job. patently desired to prevent by his ad-jJ~ lp Anises to subordinate himself to it. Instead of lettin<-''the the story made the dance —,,-its^., i- o rorv>tirirm nt thp sirim- nob Tirlp liim lio -.-iMno ii,« 4«i, i -..I. -i , , ' _ ' ' c . and there were contests all ove. laonition tion both congress for their respective WPA and j towards physical disintegration. PWA appropriations. That will not! ~~ — happen again. | prO biem and farm co-ops. In fact, CO-0'PS-Mr. Rsevelf* long lost j most of thc insid « r « g've credit for j co-operative mission to Europe will j -iHing the plan to farm co-op lead- j corae to life shortly. A report will j crs. The farmers learned that the ! be made public concerning its in- establishment of government . sub- j vestigation last Summer inio the op- j sfdies for consumer co-ops to buy So They Say was Betty this time who was missing. Angelique told of the conversation she had had with Betty earlier in the day, adding that the other girl had gone to lie down, which was weirdly true. At the very moment she said this Betty was lying, a helpless prisoner, in one of the small rooms near the underground kiva. Angelique's revenge was complete."" She coul'd afford to seem extremely anxious about Betty's disappearance now. Bob ate in silence and when the meal was finished followed Pearl John and Ramon into the library, a determined expression on his face. "Which of you knows where she is?" he demanded. Pearl John lighted a cigaret before answering coolly, "Now keep your shirt on. Bob. No use talking like that. There are only the three of us left and we've got to see this thing through together." "That's all right to say, de Forest," snapped Bob, "but I've had all I can stand, of murder and mysterious disappearances. It's a cinch Angellue is out of this. She couldn't have had anything to do with it. The professor is not even able to speak, so it simmers down to the three of us—and possibly the vanished Indian. You, de Forest, knowing all the ins and outs of this cussed place, naturally have the inside track when it comes to getting rid of people." "You're insinuating that I know where Betty went?" asked Pearl John, his cheeks darkening. "I'm not insinuating at all. I'm asking you," answered Bob sternly. "One of you must know where she is. and. by Heaven, I'm going to get it out of you, if I have to—!" a regular performer of him. And Mr. ! Ramon sprang to his feet, his hands So Mr. Hale took her into a corner, and showed her how to dance the Texas Tommy — one, two, three, turn —and so fourth. Then they stepped out on the floor together and knocked a typical Thalia assemblage cold with their performance, and the next day Mr. Hale was slightly surprised to read under big headlines in the Chronicle that he had danced with a Russian lady named Pavlowa. She was ill San Francisco at the time with Mordkin, and Mr. de Young thought it would make a nice little story for her to dance an American dance with an American dancer. Miss Pavlowa announced that she was going to take the dance back to her country, and teach it to one, and all, though Mr. Hale hasn't heard that there are any considerable number of Texas Tommy dancers in Russia at this time. over San j Francisco in the twinkling of an eye and Sid Grauman put Mr. Hale in. the old Empress Theatre, and made face. "I've got to find her," he said. "I've got to!" He turned to Ramon. "What did you mean about Angelique?" he asked. "Nothing—except that since she seems to be able to wrap any man on the place about her pretty finger, it isn't improbable that she may know more about affairs here than, she is letting on?" "We'll ask her," Pearl John decided suddenly and went in search of her. The others sat moodily, waiting. In a short time Pearl John opened the door for Angelique and she came Into the room, casting a quick glance at each of the men. "Well?" she asked. Bob walked over to her. "Are you The BEEHIVE had come in through the window and cut his bonds while he lay unconscious. But who? Bob did not debate this question long, but got to his feet and tried to think what he must do next. If he could escape from the house there might be a chance that he would meet up with someone on the road down the canyon who might help him. It was foolishe to risk another encounter with de Forest and Ramon. He was positive .now that Pearl John was far from being the amiable host | he had seemed, and it was not beyond Late to class in^ psychology this pretty co-ed had burned up the boulevard, sliding through the "change" light at several intersections but finally slammed on her brakes to the signal of a traffic officer who made the usual inquiry; "Where's the fire, young lady!" He quickly lost his stem dignity and stammered incoherently when the pretty psychology student retorted: "In your eyes, big nand- some boy!" - THE TROUBLE WITH MOST OF OUR FEMININE MOTORISTS IS THAT WE NEVER KNOW WHAT THEY'RE DRIVING AT. Young Woman—I understand that at your church you are having such, small congregations. Is that so? Other Girl—Yes, so small that every time the minister says: 'Dearly Beloved,' you feel as if you received a proposal. Does anybody really like the thick gravy that's poured over the food at cheap restaurants? IP. YOU CAN'T BELIEVE IT 13 PROFITABLE TO KEEP YOUR MOUTH SHUT, JUST LOOK^WHAT HAPPENS TO A FISH WHEN IT DOESN'T. The haughty Senior Girl sniffed disdainfully as the tiny Freshman cut in. "And just why did you have to cut in when I was dancing?" she inquired nastily. The'Freshman hung his head with shame. "I'm sorry, ma'am," he said, 'But I'm working my way through college and your partner was waving a five dollar bill at me." One way to save money is to buy only luxuries and let the 1 necessities A lot or men who battle about capital and labor never had any capital and never did any labor when .hey could get out of It. Junior—Mother dear, do you be- ieve in love at first sight? Mother—Certainly! Do you think "d have married your father if I had inly taken a second look at him? REAL MEN ARE MADE OF WHAT THEY GET OUT OF THEMSELVES, .ND NOT OUT OF OTHERS. Leon—Do you think your father vould say anything if I told him we i-ere going to get married on New ."ear.' Leona—I don't know, but I imagine 10'd say something if you told him Some men are bom unemployed ad others learned the horseshoeing trade when they were boys. Ticket Inspector—This ticket has expired. Dad—What does that mean? Ticket. Insj)cctor—It is out of date. Dnd—Don't worry about, that. • I'm pretty old-fashioned myself. mv _ _„ THOSE THAT ARF War of any kind is inevitably far eration of European co-ops, particular-i from them in bulk at sub-market i worse than any possible evils the war Martin Beck did the rest. Mr. Hale and his partners went into | a show called "A Modern Eve'' in Chicago. Joe Santley was the star, and they, had brought Victor Hollander, an eminent musician in Europe, over to lead the orchestra, and when Mr. Hale and his partner was on. Mr. Hale kept muttering ly those in Sweden and England. The i prices is a totally different thing from i undertakes to cure War setUe, noth '»?,« """"""K, lo Mr - Hollander, report will seem to be the unanimous ! co-operative marketing by producers.! . < raster ' faster - f »stcr." concliisions of the .-.even commission- j The natural gradual establishment '• '"^.' ers on the co-op question, but it will j of co-ops, on their own initiative and i • Salv! " l " r be far less than that. j money and from the bottom up, is , The commissioners dropped their j what most of the authorities around ! real conclusions into the White House i here favor now. lett«r box several months ago and ; That seems to end that. ran. These were- marked for perms- diplomat. de M:iU:iri;i^n. Swinish | One day Mr. Hollander went back | stage and said to Mr. Hale: "But, look", he said, "Suppose some n«u burial. They are supposed to; AHT— Thc New Dealers managed to i alwa >' s ! °oks more helpless in white ' ' ' | American men always associate j Ume you do not catch the girl when | white with fragility and desirability— |jou are spinning her around, faster | especially in moonlight ... A woman i faster. Where will she be?' _ = ._ ... "Right on-top of your head," re- have included a majority and minor-' hide it. but they were deeply* hurt j than she ciocs in color ' a nd it's that P lic d Mr. Hale, and never again would Sty report which cast grave doubts! when ex-Secretary of the Treasury i hcl P Icss ail ' which makes men propose. Mr - Hollander enter the orchestra pit upon the original idea of government: Mellon gave all those fifty or sixty!— K '" (l1 ^ l! »rii: Keiiss. Nen- ^'drk color while the Texas Tommy was on. financing for consumers' ana other i million dollars of art cs" a public! <,'"iiJ-ti't:inl. Mr. Hale stopped dancing in 1918 co-ops. I charity. They called it "one of Prank ! * * * finishing up with George M. Cohan' The new unanimous report is un-; Hogan's tricks." Mr. Hogan. is an j Democracy in the United States is! He turned producer awhile and derstood to be another tribute to Mr. i eminent artist i n his line, which hap- j s *' lfc as lo "S as we can joke about thc j brought the Dixieland jazz band and Roosevelt's sk'il in conciliation. Those '. pens to be the law. Lately he has \ institutions. One cannot joke about | ils "Tiger Rag" to New York, then he. who have sect, .it ir. a semi-final stale. ; been devotins; his best brush-work to I German or Russian institutions. j wonl Into the government revenue say It is a {factual recitation o! thc i the Ucfcnf.e of Mellon against ::u;ome • ~" r - Il:lrl '. v W. Chase. eluiiiceMor of; service. Then into business, and European co-op situation to which. tax prosecutions mstitutoo by the! ».w York 1'iiiversily. j wealthy, no one could object. In addition, the : Democrats. A decision in the" case j - . . He weighed 165 poundas when he coramlssioacrs may make public in- has been imminent from the board j It is fashionable today to emphasize was dancing, was young, and stron<* dividual statements concerning phases • o! " ..•••„. of the subject in which ticularly interssted. i Mr. Meiioa's art contributions. By 1 greatest ciengnr to our institutions of I speed into the Texas Tommy Now he The ?.emi-:;nal understanding wa.s i definitely making the gift now. Mr. j government is rising out of unconsti- ! <-"ds it tires him somewhat just sit- that there wc;ild be no recommcnda- j Hogan thereby makes it di.'Ilcult for i lutional extensions of judicial power, ting down, which shows von how fast * !rtr*». t rt /*/***'M-.M-C fr\* lftr»4<ln.1^.* ,u.. .^.. L..._-,._... . _.. .. ..-_.-. * _ »•«»'*•'" tool. ot clenched. "Just who set you up as judge of either of us, Graham?" he rasped. "Has it occurred to you that more than one can play at that game? What's to prevent us thinking you know something about this? You've been very much interested in Betty. Everyone knows that." * . * For a moment Bob did not answer: then he said slowly, "Yes, I have been —more than interested. That's why I'm going to tear this place to pieces. if necessary, to find her. Both of you appreciated her beauty and-charm, too. I noticed. Especially de Forest. Isn't that true, Pearl John? 1 ' He looked at him suspiciously. "If it was true, why should I do away with her?" was thc-cold reply. Bob took a turn about the room, then halted. "Why should any of the things happen that have happened since we came here?' 1 he demanded. "Toll me that." Without giving the other man a chance to speak, he rushed on, answering his own question. "It's because you planned to get things into your own hands here, and have used us as alibis. Thc more, thc better for your purpose. That's why my car couldn't be fixed, why word ccniins Phases ; o, u,.x appeals for sonir time. It the danger of unconstitutional cxtcn- j«nd never smoked, or drank, and that hasn't been sent to the proper o'fficcrs .hey are par-, hingw. a, everyone knr.-.v,, around i sions ot legislative power. But the w«s why hc could put .such Inordinate Tho de Forests didn t want nnvonc ' i Mr. Melloa's art contributions. By i greatest clpngor to our institutions of speed into the Texas Tommv. Mow ho mP .«i,,~ <„.„ thM- r,-,^,., ,„...,..• i tions to congress for legislation. '• the tax board to hold ngair.st Mtilon. i — Domild Hlclil:i:r«. former NK.\ o Al.so it gives him positive Pdc!itionnl : minis!ralor. CONVKK.SION—Many things have : pr oo; lor nn appeal to the circuit ... happened on the inside here con-'court in case the tax board Accepts! A Kansas farmer has just had re- cerning the co-operative issue since: tho Democratic eaimation oi Mr i moved from his cm- Mr. Roosevelt bccamcf interested in i Mellon. It shortly before the Democratic na-; o ] dentally. Dr. Townsonri hn s bo.on quiet I MI-;sSAr,|;_Mr. Uoostvcit'r ' *•- '- • Ibecn there for 4!) years. And, inci-j l_ a man can slow up, miieli niciiC.on n; rnm-r neallli. Dorn wonder!, what it bug that had I wi-allli would he? \valrreil >foeK" that you didn't stage thc trouble with your car just to get in here?" For a moment Bob saw red. Thc other man's taunting face swam before him, and he struck a driving blow straight into that sneer. Ramon crashed back against a chair that overturned with a thud. Then Pcnrl John grasped Bob's arms from behind and. after a few minutes' tussle, the two had him securely held. Snatching a long silken cord that held back a curtain. Pearl John looped it, about Bob's wrists. Another cord quickly tied his ankles and j the next minute Bob was'being carried to his room -.vhcrc he was thrown on thc bed. As rie Forest fumbled with the key to lock the room Bob raised his arm. "Not so fast now. I've got | nis lloatl lo spcnk but n quick blow n few things to settle with him. my- i from Damon's fist knocked him back, I self, first. Just where do I come in, i IIis Iloiul struck sharply against the I may T ask. Bob?" wooden hftd post and immediately he Ramon's black eyes Hashed. "And sure you don't know where Betty | Welch Is?" he asked. "I suppose you think I carried her away or something?" she answered sarcastically. "I didn't say that," he told her. "I asked if you knew where she is." * . *. For a moment, only the crackle of the fire was heard in the room. Then the girl's lovely eyes elowly filled with tears. "How should I know?" she sobbed. "How do I know that I won't be the next one to be struck down? Oh, why did I ever come to this terrible place! I'm afraid to close my eyes for fear someone will grab me, or the un- burieci dead .people in this house—" She collapsed in a suddering h,eap in a chair, her face white with terror. "Oh, please. Ramon, take me away!" She turned appeal'ingly to him. Bob turned furiously on the other two. "What did I tell you? It you two find any pleasure in tormenting a girl. I don't." ' He helped Angelique to her feet and led her to the door. "Forgive us. Angelique," he begged. "And try not to be so afraid. We'll get out of this somehow." He closed the door behind her. and came back to the others. "I hope that satisfies you." he snid. "The next thing, one of you will be saying that the girls pushed Pearl Pierre over the cliff. No—a. man or i men did all thc things that have been done around here, and I stiir think you both know more than you're willing to admit." "So that's it?" sneered Ramon. "You, a perfect stranger to both of us. have the nerve to accuse us of crimes that you yourself may have committed. Don't forget that neither of us ever laid eyes on you before thc night we picked you up on the road and possibility that Ramon Vasqun. was. LBV L , CK OF CONSTRUCTIW C in some way. connected with the dc I Tl'viTY CONSTRUCTIVE AC- Forest tragedies. But Betty — she was the one Bob wa s really concerned about. If he could,find her he would j gladly leave Thunder Mesa to anyone who cared to have it. He shook his head to rid it of the frightful buzzing noise in his ears and dashed cold wa- j ter over his face -until the blood came tingling to the skin. Now lie felt more fit to try to get through that open window and fight his way. if necessary, to the outside world where the law could lend n hand. Putting on a. warm coat and cap, he carefully lowered himself to the patio outside, being careful that no one should see him. Then he Father—Isn't it wonderful ho\v lit- •tle chicks get out of their shells? Junior—What gets mo is how they get in. A local pastor was examining one of the younger Sunday School classes, and asked the question: Pastor—What are the sins of omission? Little Tot (nfter n little Pilcnccl— Picasc. sir, they're sins we ought to have committed a.nd haven't. Why does a mnn have a flog?. . . . Because the animal dotes on him edged away from the house in the kind loves him. . . . Who is insensible darkness and started toward the road j to love and flattery even if it conies that led down the canyon. (To Kc Continued) from a dumb but marvolously expressive animal friend like a dog? McKENNEY ON BRIDGE CARELESS DISCARD LOSES Grand Slain ''in the Ba<r." but Declarer's Failure .Make "Safety Play'' Costs Him Contract By VTM. K. McKEN.NEY Sccrclnry. .Viiicricnn Itritlgr Lciijjuc "They used to inaugurate campaigns against traffic accidents by placing great emphasis on 'safety first'." wrote Jack Moore, of New York, in submit- ting'today's hand, in which he and his partner had reached a contract of seven hearts. "Of course." the letter continues, "thc contract is ice cold. All that way- necessary was just the slightest safety precaution, which my partner failed brought you here. How do we know l ° takc ' anti so ' instoacl of »™ kl "R messing into their family feud." With a smothered oath, Pearl .John jerked around, but Ramon gripped llonal convention. ncminl 'recently. the wrong S The official inspiration .'01 thc move • mesMige was delivered ^f.^n 1 ^ ^f" ac<> ' " ( ; ls ; sald lo > lc " d «<i it for the supreme coving, ! future, according to critics of Social •£«1±? 8 f M n ? V So ! block "*">•• n^P'tetb, ,,,or., our,,' Security: »P«nlon. I duln't R e, the hava man ot the other official MU-j reports indicate it i, as reined die number" of the question, pfivtlculnrly j proper adrlirssec and "; lyir" .^orlou.s ' • • . closely connected with UK farm j !y jfonwdcrwl. ' ' j ,„ , k , ,,,.,.,„ ,„„„„„,,„, ,,„.,,. Hollywood parties must, bo swell nf- Untrs for the men, with all those extra .„,.,„ If I had plenty of money and didn't. have to work, I would ''i a satisfiort tf> -spend the rest of my !i.v n.-, minority lender In the. st;u< Alfred E. S&lth. what makes vou sure Angelique doesn't know anything about nil this? Has she been pr.icticlng charms on you, too? What nbout the Indian? How do you know he's really disappeared?" It, was thi s last thought thai, cooled Bob's fury somewlini. Ho ran one across his eyes nnr! stood, look- felt himself sinking down, down Into darkness. How long he iny there, helpless, Bob never knew. He awoke to find a cold wind blowing across his face und when he moved tlie rcnllzftllon cnme thnt he was no longer lied. He could inovo his hiiiuls and feet, Siowly he snt/ up nnd, «s lift did so, tho severed Ing at the others, with Jcspntr on his I cords dropped to the floor. Someone' grand slam, with its premium of 1500 points, he went down on trick, and then we lost the rubber." Today's hand is a good illustration of .how careless play can be extremely costly. A single discard from dummy not in itself a terrible play, cost thc contract. There is no question nbout. the soundness of the contract. The band should be in seven and. e'.ur.llv. A A2 V K Q .1 9 8 7 * A A K 7 6 5 Rubber—None vulnerable. South West North Kast 1 V Pass 3 A Pass 3 ¥ Pass fi V Pass 7 V Pass Pass Pass OpeninR lead—A -I. Today's Contract. Problem Smith's contrnct is four spodcs. Tliorc has been no adverse bidding. After dummy is spread, what rarri should East play to thc opening trick, regard less of the play' made by dci'larcr from dummy"' 4 Q .1 n V K R fi 2 » ~ •! 2 A A fi ^ (Blind) N W E S Dealer A K R 3 V A Q 10 3 * K 8 5 <& K Q 0 (Uhnri) K & \V vnl Opener A .1 Solution m -next issue 8 should be made. The only trouble with South. Moore's : snrtn<v. was that, he took too much for granted- n fairly common fault of bridge jjlny- ere, even in the face of meet ins freak dt.stribui.lons nil the time. The opening lend was won with tho j king in duinr.iv. inid two round;-- ot I trumps cle.iird the tnnr.p suit. Now the nee of spades wr.r l;>:d down, nnc! South made iiic, c::;:r!;;.ive mistake. Instead of discarding n eiuli, hc dropped a small diamond, di.sresardin.q tho fact, that he had four trumps to lake care, of three losing diamonds. This spelled defeat. West won n club trick, due to South'* over-confidence In tho. dropping of five curds of n stilt on Vhc Icrtd of throo top honors, i!t:n, M;,,\ ,s m icr, Inc,)

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