The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas on April 12, 1951 · Page 9
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The Courier News from Blytheville, Arkansas · Page 9

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Blytheville, Arkansas
Issue Date:
Thursday, April 12, 1951
Page:
Page 9
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I THURSDAY, APRIL 12, 1D51 BI.YTHEVTU/E, (AfiKJ COURIER NEWS Mdc Arthur-Adminstration Fuss Grew from. Squabble Over Asia B.vFAMlCS .MAHI.OW + WASHINGTON. April 12. t/F) — This i.s ai ABC on the big fuss over Oenerfll jMacArlhur's ideas nnd those ot pic Truman administration which Uil the President to oust MacArthnr yesterday, jj. MacArlliur has supporters, partic- *»»ularly amcnp. Republicans in Congress. Billed down, this i.s the Mac- Avlhiiy school ot thought: 1. Although this country niul its Atlantic Pact partners are inakln, hip; plans for defense of Europe. In case Russia Utacks there, the big fight ngainst Communism has to be made in Asia. 2. MacArlhm's hands were tied He !»vas not permitted lo use his full strength in the Korean War against the chjne.se Communists ot to ifght it Llie way lie. as general in command, thought best. If this continues there can only be a stalemate, with rv.cn and materials chewed up needlessly. Roiled down, this is the opposite viewpoint: $» 1. A lot morr than Just the fighting in Korea Is at stake, possibly' outbreak of war in Europe. The great danger i; Russia, not China. Ko we can't aflord to get too deeply involved in Asia, such as all-mu war with China, which we misht do if MacArthur were allowed free rein. Hopalff For End 2. The United Nations which are In (he Korean fighting wit!) this country—keeping their eye on the ,.<i European powder keg—are hoping «Zto find an end to the fighting in Korea by reaching some settlement with China that would let them concentrate on Europe. But If MacArthur followed his ideas, such peace might be impossible .1. Further, the Truman Administration v;as miffed at MacArthur' for repeatedly popping off with suggestions which might upset this country's other plan* lor Europe, and perhaps spoiling chances of peace with China. That finally led to his dismissal. To see the situation, look at geography: The only part of China which touches Korea is Manchuria. It runs nlons the whole northern Korean border. All the men and supplies which the Chincje pour into Korea have to move dawn- through Manchuria. Also, the Ch'nese reserves and supplies are based in Manchuria. And any planes which the Chinese have, f-H'eri them by Russia, have Ui be based In Manchuria. Russia IE Manchuria's other neighbor. MacArthur wanted freedom to bomb China's Manchurian .supplies and bases. If Ihey were smashed, the Chinese in Korea would have tougher going than they've undergone to far.f t Bul MacArthur was not, permlt- .' ted to Uo this. lie. had to do alt his lighting' against, the Chinese Inside Korea, with his planes forbidden to cross the border. r. V'uiihei. Mvir.Artrnir has contended Chiang Kai-shek's Nationalist troops on the Island of Formosa should be used against the Chinese Communists. Formosa Is separalwl from the •••where MacArthur was big boss. Out it concentrated on putting its main strength into fighting Germany in Europe first, where General Jiisenhower was big boss. When Germany fell, [till American strength was turned on Asia. Nov.' MacArthur was once again in a war in Asia. This time as commander of the U.N forces. And once again Eisenhower was big boss n Europe. He's commander of the International army being put together hy this country and its Atlantic Pact partners. •" yunerally East of Leychville, Arlcan- and North of Manila, Arkansas, and South of the Arkansas. MiMDiiri state line. The above described work ^wolves the excavation of appro.xtmtitely 513,552 cubic yards NOTICK TO rOXTKACJ'OHS Scaled bids iproiiu^ui:,) tor the cdrc'dging ol Ditch No. ) Irom Stations 0/00 througl Stations 653 50; Ditch No. 2 from Stations 0-00 Ihrough 382/12;; niich No. « from along' with certain clearing and Stations 0/00 ihrcush stations ,, a nk lei-ellns operations. Finns and HO/50: Ditch No. 12 from Sta- ] specifications and other contract lion O-OO through Stations 203- H j documents covering the alXH'c rtc- »„ i* ,..-.,. <=..,.!„.., .,.„„ scrllH , d work u ,. c on Iile (ll L|le Drainage District Olfice. Lynch liuildlni!, Blythevillc. Arkansas, and the office ol the Engineer. Charles Ditch No. 16 from Stations 0-00 through Station 386-00; o! Drainage District No. 10, Chickusawlja District. Mississippi County, Arkun sas. will be received by the Hoard ol Commissioners of said DriuivAse District at the office of Attorney Oscar Fendler, Lynch fUhldius. Blylheville. Arkansas, until 10:00 C. Redman, Jr., Civil Engineers, 109 Keiinclt Street, Kcnnett, Missouri. (P O. Flos l>2) d'hone 541). Sets of the above described plans and specifications may be obtained [rom o'clock A.M., Thur.'day. April 10. the office of the Engineer, ubove 1951. at which time the imis <i»'i>- desc-rilicd, upon the deposit ol J25.- po.sals) will be i>ublic!y opened and I 00 The deposit ol uona tide bidders read in said office. i will be tctui'ued In the event that The project is located In the area said plans and specifications are returned to the olflce o( the Engl- necr uudamaKei 1 within 10 days alter the dale sel for taking bids. The Board of Directors of said Drainage District No. IS reserves the right lo reject any and all bids (proposals" and to waive any and all irregularities and informalities. A cerlllled checks or a Bid Bond executed by a company authorized to <io business In the Slate of Arkansas musl accompany each bid submitted. In an amount equal to S per cent of the total amount of bid The successful bidder will be retjulred to furnish a Performance Bond In the sum of the contract price. The successful bidder will be paid cash on monthly estimates amounting lo 90 per cent of Ihe work done. For further Information see or ad dress Oscar Fendler. Attorney, Bly- Ihcvllle. Arkansas, or Chales DcdniBii, Jr.. Engineer Keniicll, Missouri. Signed: Drainage District No. 16 ChicUasawba District Mississippi County, Arkansas Hy John Hcarden, Karl 11. Wildy Fred Flccman. Commissioners Oscar Fendler, ally. 3129-45.12 C. Kll.l.' Ihe ACHE, BURN, ITCH of ATHLETES FOOT «*M OR YOUR 4*c 1ACK. T-4-L, DUATES THE^msELS "OF THE SKIN lo r*arK UtiWddrrf Inunction *n^ * J 'l-°".l C °I\'" e ''' C "* l"»'»"».'ryin« KlltllV DUUC STORES ilead Courier News Classlfl«d Adi. DOWH.., AND HO UCHIHS OK U/RMIM Have Y«n Tri*4 rkk F*r PILE MISERY? Here [• famoun 'J Kornton Minor Clinic'* pile fotni'ila (ievelopcd throifiih 74 yeari r<f Fpcciahied practice. In clinic UM, thi« '1'hotnlon ^tinor formula ba« broiiRhl (housaruK ipccdy palliative relief fro« ilchiny, misny of simple p'llw. So good we say: "If j( doesn't tiring comfort in 20 ininntps, KC a doclor I" Oinlni*nt or cnne foi/n, inpUiin wrap[>cr. I.DoIc for Thorn ton Minor "sitrat salesman" on your dnij- KLSL'S counlcr. HIT WITH G.l.'S—Caiole Slen, New York .singer and actress, was swamped with letters from G.I/s in Korea after she posed like this for a picture that appeared in Stnrs and Stripes, service newspaper. All of which proves that the GJ.'s know what !hlne.s« mainland by n narrow atrip of water. Chiang holed up there with Ihe remnants ot hU Nationalist, hoops when (he C'omtmmfsU drove them off the mainland. Would Open Second Front Turning ihem VOOSR against, the Chinese mainland now would be opening up a second front in the Korea'n War, This country \vould have lo sumrty those .troops. Thnl would be rjiiifc a drain snul it would end hope of peace with the Comrnu- ntsU, (How many troops In Chiang's army nil Formosa? That's f.n open question. Every time you hear the number, it's different from the last time. It, ranges from 800,000 down to around 400,000.) MacArthur fumed and fussed about the- restraints placed on him and .the fact that his supplies of men were not greater. He ;i argiicd the problem in A.sia needed more attention. He wasn't- happy about the role given Asia even during World War II either. After the Japanese attack on Penrl Harbor, this country sen 1 troops and ships Into the Pacific easy-going CALFSKINS Spier your Spring suits anrt frnrks with colorful Natural 1'ni.sc mtd-licclers! Available in Kerf. Navy or While Calf. Heller's Shoe Store 423 W, Moin Phone 3549 YES, WE BUY Scrap Iron aud Mclal. 01(1 Cars, Plows, Cullivalors, Tin, Wire, Hatlcrics, Kadiatovs, IZags and other itcnifi nl III lie vninc (n yon. We sell all kinds of aujjlc iron, flal iron, >:tc. and nhcii you need Coal and KimllirtK. call... HESTER'S COAL & SCRAP METAL YARD S. Highway fil Phone ? INTRODUC A Smart Line Of Pretty 'Versatile' \ Wonderfully versatile, bccaus* (his pretty laced shoe looks just, right with suits, play- logs or dresses. Crisp whilt butcher linen. 299 Ankle Strap CASUALS America's Fpremost Popular-Priced Casual Shoes \ • Advanced in Styling • Beautiful New Colors KIDSKIN-ELK-.BUTCHER LNEN Graceful us twining ivy, this tendril ankle strap liiat curves nbotit your leg. Those are low- riding casuals. While butcher linen. 299 Butcher Linen I jncn is in the limelight . , • favorite fabric of fashion. They leave most of your foot bare for sun and comfort. In solid white. 299 Fit for Cinderella Pretty enough to compliment your favorite dresses. A low *ling pump of butcher linen with dimpled bow over toe. Eggshell and while. 299 EXCLUSIVELY IN BLYTHEVILLE AT Band Sandal Kor fun-loving gals who lik« all the smartness you can get. A fine leather sandal m«d« of a few white bands. In solid while. 399 Latticed Sandals As cool a.s latticed blinds closed against the hot summer sun. The heel is high enough for dress, low for comfort. White butcher linen. 299 TriencHy SHOES Next Door To Woods Drug Store Soft Leather Twin bo\v knots over an open vamp on this close-lo-the ground castial of soft leather. In multi colored red, green, yellow and blue. Leather Casual The cooling open-work of lattice strips across your vamp. A little leather casual that's easy as an otd friend, in wheat. 5 95

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